Browsing by Subject "PROVIDES"

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  • Grunewald, M.; Kumar, S.; Sharife, H.; Volinsky, E.; Gileles-Hillel, A.; Licht, T.; Permyakova, A.; Hinden, L.; Azar, S.; Friedmann, Y.; Kupetz, P.; Tzuberi, R.; Anisimov, A.; Alitalo, K.; Horwitz, M.; Leebhoff, S.; Khoma, O. Z.; Hlushchuk, R.; Djonov, Valentin G; Abramovitch, R.; Tam, J.; Keshet, E. (2021)
    Aging is an established risk factor for vascular diseases, but vascular aging itself may contribute to the progressive deterioration of organ function. Here, we show in aged mice that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling insufficiency, which is caused by increased production of decoy receptors, may drive physiological aging across multiple organ systems. Increasing VEGF signaling prevented age-associated capillary loss, improved organ perfusion and function, and extended life span. Healthier aging was evidenced by favorable metabolism and body composition and amelioration of aging-associated pathologies including hepatic steatosis, sarcopenia, osteoporosis, "inflammaging" (age-related multiorgan chronic inflammation), and increased tumor burden. These results indicate that VEGF signaling insufficiency affects organ aging in mice and suggest that modulating this pathway may result in increased mammalian life span and improved overall health.
  • Genetics DNA Methylation Consort; NHLBI Trans-Omics Precision Med; McCartney, Daniel L.; Min, Josine L.; Richmond, Rebecca C.; Palviainen, Teemu; Ollikainen, Miina; Kaprio, Jaakko (2021)
    Background Biological aging estimators derived from DNA methylation data are heritable and correlate with morbidity and mortality. Consequently, identification of genetic and environmental contributors to the variation in these measures in populations has become a major goal in the field. Results Leveraging DNA methylation and SNP data from more than 40,000 individuals, we identify 137 genome-wide significant loci, of which 113 are novel, from genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses of four epigenetic clocks and epigenetic surrogate markers for granulocyte proportions and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 levels, respectively. We find evidence for shared genetic loci associated with the Horvath clock and expression of transcripts encoding genes linked to lipid metabolism and immune function. Notably, these loci are independent of those reported to regulate DNA methylation levels at constituent clock CpGs. A polygenic score for GrimAge acceleration showed strong associations with adiposity-related traits, educational attainment, parental longevity, and C-reactive protein levels. Conclusion This study illuminates the genetic architecture underlying epigenetic aging and its shared genetic contributions with lifestyle factors and longevity.
  • GoLEAD Consortium; SUMMIT Consortium; van Zuydam, Natalie R.; Stiby, Alexander; Abdalla, Moustafa; Dahlström, Emma H.; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Sandholm, Niina; Forsblom, Carol; Sinisalo, Juha; Perola, Markus; Kallio, Milla; Groop, Per-Henrik; Groop, Leif; Kullo, Iftikhar J. (2021)
    Background: Peripheral artery disease (PAD) affects >200 million people worldwide and is associated with high mortality and morbidity. We sought to identify genomic variants associated with PAD overall and in the contexts of diabetes and smoking status. Methods: We identified genetic variants associated with PAD and then meta-analyzed with published summary statistics from the Million Veterans Program and UK Biobank to replicate their findings. Next, we ran stratified genome-wide association analysis in ever smokers, never smokers, individuals with diabetes, and individuals with no history of diabetes and corresponding interaction analyses, to identify variants that modify the risk of PAD by diabetic or smoking status. Results: We identified 5 genome-wide significant (P-association
  • Connor, Thomas R.; Owen, Sian V.; Langridge, Gemma; Connell, Steve; Nair, Satheesh; Reuter, Sandra; Dallman, Timothy J.; Corander, Jukka; Tabing, Kristine C.; Le Hello, Simon; Fookes, Maria; Doublet, Benoit; Zhou, Zhemin; Feltwell, Theresa; Ellington, Matthew J.; Herrera, Silvia; Gilmour, Matthew; Cloeckaert, Axel; Achtman, Mark; Parkhill, Julian; Wain, John; De Pinna, Elizabeth; Weill, Franois-Xavier; Peters, Tansy; Thomson, Nick (2016)
    For 100 years, it has been obvious that Salmonella enterica strains sharing the serotype with the formula 1,4,[ 5], 12: b:1,2-now known as ParatyphiB-can cause diseases ranging from serious systemic infections to self-limiting gastroenteritis. Despite considerable predicted diversity between strains carrying the common Paratyphi B serotype, there remain few methods that subdivide the group into groups that are congruent with their disease phenotypes. Paratyphi B therefore represents one of the canonical examples in Salmonella where serotyping combined with classical microbiological tests fails to provide clinically informative information. Here, we use genomics to provide the first high-resolution view of this serotype, placing it into a wider genomic context of the Salmonella enterica species. These analyses reveal why it has been impossible to subdivide this serotype based upon phenotypic and limited molecular approaches. By examining the genomic data in detail, we are able to identify common features that correlate with strains of clinical importance. The results presented here provide new diagnostic targets, as well as posing important new questions about the basis for the invasive disease phenotype observed in a subset of strains. IMPORTANCE Salmonella enterica strains carrying the serotype Paratyphi B have long been known to possess Jekyll and Hyde characteristics; some cause gastroenteritis, while others cause serious invasive disease. Understanding what makes up the population of strains carrying this serotype, as well as the source of their invasive disease, is a 100-year-old puzzle that we address here using genomics. Our analysis provides the first high-resolution view of this serotype, placing strains carrying serotype Paratyphi B into the wider genomic context of the Salmonella enterica species. This work reveals a history of disease dating back to the middle ages, caused by a group of distinct lineages with various abilities to cause invasive disease. By quantifying the key genomic differences between the invasive and noninvasive populations, we are able to identify key virulence-related targets that can form the basis of simple, rapid, point-of-care tests.