Browsing by Subject "PSYCHIATRIC-PATIENTS"

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  • Wasserman, D.; Apter, G.; Baeken, C.; Bailey, S.; Balazs, J.; Bec, C.; Bienkowski, P.; Bobes, J.; Ortiz, M. F. Bravo; Brunn, H.; Boke, O.; Camilleri, N.; Carpiniello, B.; Chihai, J.; Chkonia, E.; Courtet, P.; Cozman, D.; David, M.; Dom, G.; Esanu, A.; Falkai, P.; Flannery, W.; Gasparyan, K.; Gerlinger, G.; Gorwood, P.; Gudmundsson, O.; Hanon, C.; Heinz, A.; Dos Santos, M. J. Heitor; Hedlund, A.; Ismayilov, F.; Ismayilov, N.; Isometsä, E. T.; Izakova, L.; Kleinberg, A.; Kurimay, T.; Reitan, S. Klaebo; Lecic-Tosevski, D.; Lehmets, A.; Lindberg, N.; Lundblad, K. A.; Lynch, G.; Maddock, C.; Malt, U. F.; Martin, L.; Martynikhin, I.; Maruta, N. O.; Matthys, F.; Mazaliauskiene, R.; Mihajlovic, G.; Peles, A. Mihaljevic; Miklavic, V.; Mohr, P.; Ferrandis, M. Munarriz; Musalek, M.; Neznanov, N.; Ostorharics-Horvath, G.; Pajevic, I.; Popova, A.; Pregelj, P.; Prinsen, E.; Rados, C.; Roig, A.; Kuzman, M. Rojnic; Samochowiec, J.; Sartorius, N.; Savenko, Y.; Skugarevsky, O.; Slodecki, E.; Soghoyan, A.; Stone, D. S.; Taylor-East, R.; Terauds, E.; Tsopelas, C.; Tudose, C.; Tyano, S.; Vallon, P.; van der Gaag, R. J.; Varandas, P.; Vavrusova, L.; Voloshyn, P.; Wancata, J.; Wise, J.; Zemishlany, Z.; Oncu, F.; Vahip, S. (2020)
    Background. Compulsory admission procedures of patients with mental disorders vary between countries in Europe. The Ethics Committee of the European Psychiatric Association (EPA) launched a survey on involuntary admission procedures of patients with mental disorders in 40 countries to gather information from all National Psychiatric Associations that are members of the EPA to develop recommendations for improving involuntary admission processes and promote voluntary care. Methods. The survey focused on legislation of involuntary admissions and key actors involved in the admission procedure as well as most common reasons for involuntary admissions. Results. We analyzed the survey categorical data in themes, which highlight that both medical and legal actors are involved in involuntary admission procedures. Conclusions. We conclude that legal reasons for compulsory admission should be reworded in order to remove stigmatization of the patient, that raising awareness about involuntary admission procedures and patient rights with both patients and family advocacy groups is paramount, that communication about procedures should be widely available in lay-language for the general population, and that training sessions and guidance should be available for legal and medical practitioners. Finally, people working in the field need to be constantly aware about the ethical challenges surrounding compulsory admissions.
  • Flink, N.; Lehto, S. M.; Koivumaa-Honkanen, H.; Viinamäki, H.; Ruusunen, A.; Valkonen-Korhonen, M.; Honkalampi, K. (2017)
    Background and objectives: Suicidal ideation is a key risk factor for suicidal behaviour among depressed individuals. To explore underlying cognitive patterns associated with suicidal ideation, the present study compared early maladaptive schemas (EMSs) among psychiatric outpatients in treatment for major depressive disorder with and without current suicidal ideation. Methods: The sample consisted of 79 depressed patients who responded to the background questionnaire and completed the Young Schema Questionnaire short form-extended, 21-item Beck Depression Inventory and Beck Hopelessness Scale. Results: Patients with suicidal ideation were more maladaptive in respect to the majority of EMSs compared to those without. After controlling for the concurrent depressive symptom severity and hopelessness 'Vulnerability to Harm or Illness' EMS, which concerns catastrophising beliefs, remained a predictor for suicidal ideation. Conclusion: EMSs may contribute to suicidal ideation among depressed individuals regardless of their mood and future orientation. These results offer implications for the assessment and treatment of suicidality. (C) 2017 Asociacion Universitaria de Zaragoza para el Progreso de la Psiquiatria y la Salud Mental. Published by Elsevier Espana, S.L.U. All rights reserved.
  • Carlson, Emily; Saarikallio, Suvi; Toiviainen, Petri; Bogert, Brigitte; Kliuchko, Marina; Brattico, Elvira (2015)
    Music therapists use guided affect regulation in the treatment of mood disorders. However, self-directed uses of music in affect regulation are not fully understood. Some uses of music may have negative effects on mental health, as can non music regulation strategies, such as rumination. Psychological testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were used explore music listening strategies in relation to mental health. Participants (n = 123) were assessed for depression, anxiety and Neuroticism, and uses of Music in Mood Regulation (MMR). Neural responses to music were measured in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in a subset of participants (n = 56). Discharge, using music to express negative emotions, related to increased anxiety and Neuroticism in all participants and particularly in males. Males high in Discharge showed decreased activity of mPFC during music listening compared with those using less Discharge. Females high in Diversion, using music to distract from negative emotions, showed more mPFC activity than females using less Diversion. These results suggest that the use of Discharge strategy can be associated with maladaptive patterns of emotional regulation, and may even have long-term negative effects on mental health. This finding has real-world applications in psychotherapy and particularly in clinical music therapy.
  • Jylhä, Pekka; Rosenstrom, Tom; Mantere, Outi; Suominen, Kirsi; Melartin, Tarja; Vuorilehto, Maria; Holma, Mikael; Riihimaki, Kirsi; Oquendo, Maria A.; Keltikangas-Jarvinen, Liisa; Isometsa, Erkki T. (2016)
    Background: Comorbid personality disorders may predispose patients with mood disorders to suicide attempts (SAs), but factors mediating this effect are not well known. Methods: Altogether 597 patients from three prospective cohort studies (Vantaa Depression Study, Jorvi Bipolar Study, and Vantaa Primary Care Depression Study) were interviewed at baseline, at 18 months, and in VDS and PC-VDS at 5 years. Personality disorders (PDs) at baseline, number of previous SAs, life-charted time spent in major depressive episodes (MDEs), and precise timing of SAs during follow-up were determined and investigated. Results: Overall, 219 (36.7%) patients had a total of 718 lifetime SAs; 88 (14.7%) patients had 242 SAs during the prospective follow-up. Having any PD diagnosis increased the SA rate, both lifetime and prospectively evaluated, by 90% and 102%, respectively. All PD clusters increased the rate of new SAs, although cluster C PDs more than the others. After adjusting for time spent in MDEs, only cluster C further increased the SA rate (by 52%). Mediation analyses of PD effects on prospectively ascertained SAs indicated significant mediated effects through time at risk in MDEs, but also some direct effects. Limitations: Findings generalizable only to patients with mood disorders. Conclusions: Among mood disorder patients, comorbid PDs increase the risk of SAs to approximately two-fold. The excess risk is mostly due to patients with comorbid PDs spending more time in depressive episodes than those without. Consequently, risk appears highest for PDs that most predispose to chronicity and recurrences. However, also direct risk-modifying effects of PDs exist. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Eskelinen, Saana; Suvisaari, Janne V. J.; Suvisaari, Jaana M. (2020)
    Background Guidelines on laboratory screening in schizophrenia recommend annual monitoring of fasting lipids and glucose. The utility and the cost effectiveness of more extensive laboratory screening have not been studied. Methods The Living Conditions and the Physical Health of Outpatients with Schizophrenia Study provided a comprehensive health examination, including a laboratory test panel for 275 participants. We calculated the prevalence of the results outside the reference range for each laboratory test, and estimated the cost effectiveness to find an aberrant test result using the number needed to screen to find one abnormal result (NNSAR) and the direct cost spent to find one abnormal result (DCSAR, NNSAR x direct cost per test) formulas. In addition, we studied whether patients who were obese or used clozapine had more often abnormal results. Results A half of the sample had 25-hydroxyvitamin D below, and almost one-fourth cholesterol, triglycerides or glucose above the reference range. One-fifth had sodium below and gamma glutamyltransferase above the reference range. NNSAR was highest for potassium (137) and lowest for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (2). DCSAR was below 5euro for glucose, all lipids and sodium, and below 10euro for creatinine and gamma glutamyltransferase. Potassium (130euro), pH-adjusted ionized calcium (33 euro) and thyroid stimulating hormone (33euro) had highest DCSARs. Several abnormal results were more common in obese and clozapine using patients. Conclusions An annual laboratory screening panel for an outpatient with schizophrenia should include fasting glucose, lipids, sodium, creatinine, a liver function test and complete blood count, and preferably 25-hydroxyvitamin D.