Browsing by Subject "PSYCHOLOGICAL CONTROL"

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  • Bjorklund, Katja; Liski, Antti; Samposalo, Hanna; Lindblom, Jallu; Hella, Juho; Huhtinen, Heini; Ojala, Tiina; Alasuvanto, Paula; Koskinen, Hanna-Leena; Kiviruusu, Olli; Hemminki, Elina; Punamaki, Raija-Leena; Sund, Reijo; Solantaus, Tytti; Santalahti, Paivi (2014)
  • Kikas, Eve; Tang, Xin (2019)
    This study examined relations between child-reported teacher emotional support, teaching practices, and children's task-persistent learning behaviour. The study was carried out in Estonia, where a students' first teacher advances with his/her students and teaches all primary subjects in the first 3years of schooling. In total, 660 sixth-grade children reported about their first teacher's emotional support. Teachers' child-centred and teacher-directed practices were observed with the Early Childhood Classroom Observation Measure (ECCOM); results included 38 teachers in Grade 1, and 37 in Grade 3. Within the same grades, teachers reported on their affection for students, as well as their behavioural and psychological control over students. Teachers also evaluated each of their student's task persistence. As shown by ECCOM results, retrospective student-reported teacher emotional support tended to be positively related to child-centred practises, and negatively related to teacher-directed practises in Grade 3, while also negatively related to teacher-reported psychological control in Grade 1. Although higher perceived emotional support was related with more persistent learning behaviour on an individual level, general task persistence was predicted primarily by teacher-reported practices at the classroom level.
  • Ahola, Réa; Soini, Tiina; Pietarinen, Janne; Pyhältö, Kirsi (2021)
    The study explores the schoolwork social support experiences of teachers, peers and parents. The data were collected from 1529 Finnish seventh-grade (age 13–14 years) pupils using The Students’ Learning Agency inventory (SLA). The results indicate that social support is a dynamic system in which adult support is an important resource for pupils’ schoolwork, regardless of the pupils’ gender and sosio-economic status of the school. In particular, support from teachers increased the likelihood of support sharing between peers. However, there were differences in this teachers’ effect on peer support in terms of gender; the connection was weaker for girls than for boys. Hence, teacher support appeared to affect boys’ peer relations more than girls’.