Browsing by Subject "PULSE-WAVE VELOCITY"

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  • Finndiane Study Grp (2018)
    Aims/hypothesis This study aimed to assess the use of ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) to identify the presence of masked, nocturnal and white-coat hypertension in individuals with type 1 diabetes, patterns that could not be detected by regular office-based BP monitoring alone. We also analysed associations between BP patterns and arterial stiffness in order to identify individuals at cardiovascular risk. Methods This substudy included 140 individuals with type 1 diabetes from the Helsinki metropolitan area, who attended the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study (FinnDiane) Centre in Helsinki between January 2013 and August 2017. Twenty-four hour ABPM and pulse wave analysis were performed simultaneously using a validated non-invasive brachial oscillometric device (Mobil-O-Graph). Definitions of hypertension were based on the European Society of Hypertension guidelines. Masked hypertension was defined as normal office BP (BP obtained using a standardised automated BP device) but elevated 24 h ABPM, and white-coat hypertension as elevated office BP but normal 24 h ABPM. Results A total of 38% of individuals were normotensive and 33% had sustained hypertension, while 23% had masked and 6% had white-coat hypertension. About half of the cohort had increased absolute levels of night-time BP, half of whom were untreated. In the ambulatory setting, central BP and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were higher in participants with masked hypertension than in those with normotension (p <0.001). In a multivariable linear regression model adjusted for age, sex, BMI, antihypertensive treatment and eGFR, masked hypertension was independently associated with higher 24 h PWV ((3 0.50 [95% CI 0.34, 0.66]), but not with PWV obtained during resting conditions (adjusted 13 0.28 [95% CI -0.53, 1.10]), using normotension as the reference group. Conclusions/interpretation ABPM analysis revealed that one-quarter of the participants with type 1 diabetes had masked hypertension; these individuals would not have been detected by office BP alone. Moreover, arterial stiffness was increased in individuals with masked hypertension. These findings support the use of ABPM to identify individuals at risk of cardiovascular disease.
  • Tynjälä, Anniina; Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Groop, Per-Henrik; Gordin, Daniel (2020)
    OBJECTIVE Type 1 diabetes is accompanied by a significant burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is poorly explained by traditional risk factors. We therefore aimed to explore whether arterial stiffness estimated by the augmentation index (AIx) predicts mortality in individuals with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS After baseline examination comprising pulse wave analysis by applanation tonometry alongside assessment of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, 906 individuals with type 1 diabetes from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study were followed up for a median of 8.2 years (interquartile range 5.7-9.7). Associations between baseline hemodynamics, including AIx, and all-cause mortality as well as a composite of cardiovascular and/or diabetes-related mortality were investigated using multivariable Cox regression models. RESULTS The 67 individuals who died during follow-up had higher baseline AIx (median 28% [interquartile range 21-33] vs. 19% [9-27];P<0.001) compared with those alive. This association was independent of conventional risk factors (age, sex, BMI, HbA(1c), estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], and previous CVD event) in Cox regression analysis (standardized hazard ratio 1.71 [95% CI 1.10-2.65];P= 0.017) and sustained in a subanalysis of individuals with chronic kidney disease. Similarly, higher AIx was associated with the composite secondary end point of cardiovascular and diabetes-related death (N= 53) after adjustments for sex, BMI, eGFR, previous CVD event, and height (standardized hazard ratio 2.30 [1.38-3.83];P= 0.001). CONCLUSIONS AIx predicts all-cause mortality as well as a composite cardiovascular and/or diabetes-related cause of death in individuals with type 1 diabetes, independent of established cardiovascular risk factors.
  • Benetos, Athanase; Petrovic, Mirko; Strandberg, Timo (2019)
    The prevalence of arterial hypertension, particularly systolic hypertension, is constantly rising worldwide. This is mainly the clinical expression of arterial stiffening as a result of the population's aging. Chronic elevation in blood pressure represents a major risk factor not only for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality but also for cognitive decline and loss of autonomy later in life. Clinical evidence obtained in community-dwelling older people with few comorbidities and preserved autonomy supports the beneficial effects of lowering blood pressure in older hypertensive subjects even after the age of 80 years. However, observational studies in frail older individuals treated for hypertension have shown higher morbidity and mortality rates compared with those with lower blood pressure levels. Clearly, in very old subjects, the therapeutic strategy of one size fits all cannot be applied because of the enormous functional heterogeneity in these individuals. Geriatric medicine proposes taking into account the function/ frailty/ autonomy status of older people. In the present review, we propose to adapt the antihypertensive treatment using an easy-to-apply visual numeric scale allowing the identification of 3 different patient profiles according to the functional status and autonomy for activities of daily living. For the preserved function profile, strategies should be those proposed for younger old adults. For the loss of function/ preserved activities of daily living' profile, a more detailed geriatric assessment is needed to define the benefit/ risk balance as well as requirements for the tailoring of the various therapeutic strategies. Lastly, for the loss of function and altered activities of daily living' profile, therapeutic strategies should be thoroughly reassessed, including deprescribing (when considered appropriate). In the near future, controlled trials are necessary for the most frail older subjects (ie, in those systematically excluded from previous clinical trials) to gain stronger evidence regarding the benefits of the various therapeutic strategies.
  • Gordin, Daniel; Saraheimo, Markku; Tuomikangas, Jaana; Soro-Paavonen, Aino; Forsblom, Carol; Paavonen, Karri Jorma Antero; Steckel-Hamann, Birgit; Vandenhende, Francois; Nicolaou, Loizos; Pavo, Imre; Koivisto, Veikko; Groop, Per-Henrik (2016)
    Context: Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether postprandial hyperglycemia affects arterial function in T2D. Design: Asingle-center, open-label study of three groups of men were studied: 1) T2D patients with albuminuria (n = 22), 2) T2D patients without albuminuria (n = 24), and 3) nondiabetic controls (n = 25). Patients were randomized to a two-period crossover study schedule, ingesting breakfast, with or without insulin lispro (to induce low or high postprandial glycemia). Main Outcome Measures: Arterial stiffness was assessed by calculating pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index using applanation tonometry, and endothelial dysfunction was assessed using peripheral arterial tonometry, 30 minutes before breakfast and up to 240 minutes after breakfast. Results: At baseline, arterial stiffness was increased in patients. When adjusted for age and body mass index, in a combined group of patients with and without albuminuria, brachial PWV was higher during low (P = .032) and high (P = .038) postprandial glycemia vs controls. These differences were driven by the albuminuria group vs controls during low (P = .014) and high (P = .018) postprandial glycemia. No differences were observed in aortic PWV, augmentation index, or peripheral arterial tonometry ratio between patients and controls. Endothelin-1 and IL-6 were higher, and superoxide dismutase was lower, during postprandial hyperglycemia in T2D patients vs controls. Conclusions: In patients with T2D and albuminuria, brachial PWV was higher under postprandial hyperglycemic conditions, relative to controls. These data suggest that hyperglycemia induces an increase in stiffness of intermediate-sized arteries. We found no changes in other parts of the arterial bed.
  • Vilmi-Kerala, Tiina; Lauhio, Anneli; Tervahartiala, Taina; Palomaki, Outi; Uotila, Jukka; Sorsa, Timo; Palomaki, Ari (2017)
    Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has significant implications for the future health of the mother. Some clinical studies have suggested subclinical inflammation and vascular dysfunction after GDM. We aimed to study whether concentrations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) and -9, as well as values of arterial stiffness differ between women with and without a history of GDM a few years after delivery. We also investigated possible effects of obesity on the results. Methods: We studied two cohorts-120 women with a history of GDM and 120 controls-on average 3.7 years after delivery. Serum concentrations of hsCRP were determined by immunonephelometric and immunoturbidimetric methods, MMP-8 by immunofluorometric assay, and MMP-9 and TIMP-1 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was determined using the foot-to-foot velocity method from carotid and femoral waveforms by using a SphygmoCor device. Arterial compliance was measured non-invasively by an HDI/PulseWave T CR-2000 arterial tonometer. All 240 women were also included in subgroup analyses to study the effect of obesity on the results. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed with adjustment for confounding factors. Results: PWV after pregnancy complicated by GDM was significantly higher than after normal pregnancy, 6.44 +/- 0.83 (SD) vs. 6.17 +/- 0.74 m/s (p = 0.009). Previous GDM was also one of the significant determinants of PWV in multiple linear regression analyses. On the other hand, compliance indices of both large (p = 0.092) and small (p = 0.681) arteries did not differ between the study cohorts. Serum TIMP-1 levels were significantly increased after previous GDM (p = 0.020). However, no differences were found in the serum levels of MMP-8, MMP-9 or hsCRP. In subgroup analyses, there were significantly higher concentrations of hsCRP (p = 0.015) and higher PWV (p <0.001) among obese women compared with non-obese ones. Conclusions: PWV values were significantly higher after GDM compared with normoglycemic pregnancies and were associated with prolonged TIMP-1 upregulation. Cardiovascular risk factors were more common in participants with high BMI than in those with previous GDM.
  • Gylling, Helena; Halonen, Janne; Lindholm, Harri; Konttinen, Jussi; Simonen, Piia; Nissinen, Markku J.; Savolainen, Aslak; Talvi, Airi; Hallikainen, Maarit (2013)