Browsing by Subject "Passer domesticus"

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  • Quesada, J.; Chavez-Zichinelli, Carlos A.; Garcia-Arroyo, Michelle; Yeh, Pamela J.; Guevara, R.; Izquierdo-Palma, J.; MacGregor-Fors, I. (2022)
    Bold or shy? Examining the risk-taking behavior and neophobia of invasive and non-invasive house sparrows. Behavior provides a useful framework for understanding specialization, with animal personality aiding our understanding of the invasiveness of birds. Invasions imply dispersion into unknown areas and could require changes in behavior or spatial clustering based on personality. Reduced neophobia and increased exploring behavior could allow individuals to colonize new areas as they test and use non-familiar resources. Here, we hypothesized that house sparrow (Passer domesticus) individuals from invasive populations would exhibit bolder behavior than in non-invasive populations. We assessed risk taking and neophobia in male house sparrows in Barcelona (where it is considered native) and in Mexico City (where it has become widely invasive), captured in two different habitats, urban and non-urban. We assessed latency to enter an experimental cage and to explore it, and latency to feed and feeding time in the presence of a novel object. We found that sparrows from Mexico City, both from urban and non-urban areas, were quicker to enter the experimental cage than the sparrows from Barcelona. The time it took the birds to start exploring the cage gave a similar result. We found no differences between cities or habitats in the latency to feed and feeding time while exposed to a novel object. Our results partially support the view that the invader populations from Mexico City are bolder than those from Barcelona. Behavior is an important component of plasticity and its variability may have an important effect on adaptation to local situations. Future studies should disentangle the underlying mechanisms that explain the different personalities found in populations of different regions, contrasting populations of different densities, and taking different food availability scenarios into account.
  • Pena-Peniche, Alexander; Mota-Vargas, Claudio; Garcia-Arroyo, Michelle; MacGregor-Fors, Ian (2021)
    Biological invasions occur when individuals of alien species establish and colonize new locations. The House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) is one of the most widespread invasive birds, native to Eurasia and North Africa, and has successfully invaded many regions from across the world. The House Sparrow was successfully introduced in 1852 into North America and quickly invaded most of the North American continent, except the Florida Peninsula. Currently, the species is found throughout agricultural and urban landscapes of North America except the Yucatan Peninsula. We analyzed the invasion process of the House Sparrow in order to determine why it is absent from the Yucatan Peninsula. For this, we focused our assessment on historical records of the species together with climatic variables. Using an ordination analysis, we compared the climatic space of the North American records for the House Sparrow with that of the Yucatan Peninsula, as well as those before and after the Florida Peninsula invasion, which took sparrows longer to fully colonize. We found that climate may represent an important driver in the process of invasion in the North American invasion of House Sparrows, probably delaying the Florida invasion, and so far, preventing the Yucatan Peninsula invasion. Our results suggest that the absence of the House Sparrow in the Yucatan Peninsula could be a temporal delay, as occurred in the Florida Peninsula; yet, climatic conditions in the Yucatan Peninsula show important differences from those of the Florida Peninsula. Given the species' plasticity and generalist life history traits, it is possible that the House Sparrow may overcome present climatic restrictions and invade the Yucatan Peninsula if proper management is not set in action.