Browsing by Subject "Physical inactivity"

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  • Piirtola, Maarit; Kaprio, Jaakko; Silventoinen, Karri; Svedberg, Pia; Korhonen, Tellervo; Ropponen, Annina (2017)
    To investigate longitudinal associations of smoking and a change in smoking status with leisure-time physical inactivity. In addition, to control whether familial confounding (genetics and shared environment) influences the associations. Data were based on the population-based Finnish Adult Twin Cohort of 5254 twin individuals born in 1945-1957 (41% men) and who participated in all four surveys over a 35-year follow-up (1975-2011). Logistic and conditional logistic regression models with multiple covariates were used for analyses. Compared to never-smokers, long-term daily smokers (1975-1990) had the highest likelihood for both long-term inactivity and to change into inactive by 2011. Recurrent smoking was associated with long-term inactivity. Instead, in comparison to persistent daily smokers, quitting smoking decreased the likelihood of becoming physically inactive at leisure time. The associations remained in the analyses which accounted for multiple covariates and/or familial confounding. Daily smoking increases the likelihood of remaining or becoming physically inactive over the decades. Our results emphasize not only the importance of preventing smoking initiation, but also to support early smoking cessation in promotion of lifelong physical activity.
  • Stubbs, Brendon; Vancampfort, Davy; Mänty, Minna; Svärd, Anna; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahti, Jouni (2017)
    This study aimed to examine the bidirectional relationship between psychotropic medication use and changes in leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) among a population cohort study. Phase 1 data were collected by mail surveys in 2000-2002 among 40-60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland, and phase 2 follow up survey was conducted in 2007. Based on self-report, the respondents were classified as inactive and active (.14.75 MET-hours/week) at the phases 1 and 2. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated for subsequent (2007-10) psychotropic medication purchasing according to changes in physical activity (phases 1-2). Odds ratios (OR) for physical inactivity at phase 2 were calculated according to the amount of psychotropic medication between phases 1-2. Overall, 5361 respondents were included (mean age 50 years, 80% women). Compared with the persistently active, the persistently inactive, those decreasing and adopting LTPA had an increased risk for psychotropic medication. Only the persistently inactive remained at increased risk for psychotropic medication use, following the adjustment for prior psychotropic medication use. Compared with those having no medication, the risk for physical inactivity increased as the psychotropic medication increased. Our data suggest that physical activity has an important role in maintaining wellbeing and reducing psychotropic medication usage.
  • Lahti, Jouni; Holstila, Ansku; Mänty, Minna; Lahelma, Eero; Rahkonen, Ossi (2016)
    Background: Disability retirement is an economic, public health and work life issue causing costs for employees, workplaces and society. Adopting physical activity at middle-age has been associated with reduced risk of sickness absence and mortality. The aim of this study was to examine how changes over time in leisure time physical activity are associated with subsequent disability retirement among midlife employees. Methods: The Helsinki Health Study cohort baseline (phase 1) mail questionnaire survey data were collected in 2000, 2001 and 2002 among 40-60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland. A phase 2 survey was conducted in 2007 (N = 3943). Respondents were classified into three groups: 1. low-active ( = 14 MET-hours/week in moderate-intensity physical activity) and 3. vigorously active (> = 14 MET-hours/week including vigorous physical activity) at both phases. This yielded nine groups for describing stability and change of leisure time physical activity. Disability retirement data were derived from the registry of the Finnish Centre for Pensions until the end of 2013. A Cox regression analysis was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CI) adjusting for covariates. Results: During the follow-up, 264 (6.7 %) participants retired due to disability. Compared with those who were persistently low-active, those who increased their physical activity from low to vigorous had a lower risk of subsequent disability retirement (HR = 0.38, 95 % CI = 0.15-0.97) when adjusting for age, gender, occupational social class, strenuousness of work, smoking and binge drinking. Similarly, compared with those who were persistently moderately active, those increasing from moderate to vigorous (HR = 0.50, 95 % CI = 0.28-0.86) had a reduced risk. In contrast, those decreasing their physical activity from vigorous to low (HR = 2.42, 95 % CI = 1. 32-4.41) or moderate (HR = 1.70, 95 % CI = 1.03-2.82) had an increased risk, compared with those who were persistently vigorously active. Adjusting for BMI, limiting longstanding illness and prior sickness absence somewhat attenuated the associations. Conclusions: Adopting vigorous physical activity was associated with a reduced risk of disability retirement. Promoting vigorous physical activity among midlife employees may help prevent disability retirement.
  • Merikanto, Ilona; Kuula, Liisa; Lahti, Jari; Raikkonen, Katri; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina (2020)
    Objective: Adolescence is often associated with decline in physical activity (PA) and a circadian shift towards eveningness, but it is not known whether these transitions are intertwined. We explored longitudinally and in cross-section how chronotype and genetic liability for morningness associate with PA as self-reported and measured by actigraphy in early and late adolescence. Methods: Our sample comes from a longitudinal Finnish community-cohort born in 1998 with information on actigraph-based PA and objectively measured sleep-wake rhythm based on midpoint of sleep at ages 12 (N = 353, girls = 187) and 17 (N = 171, girls = 98). Information on self-reported circadian preference and subjective PA was available at age 17. The summarized genetic effects of multiple single nucleotide polymorphism for morningness was assessed by calculating polygenic score (PGS) based on the results on a recent genome-wide association study (GWAS). Results: PA declined by 40% (p <0.0001) in boys and by 32% in girls (p <0.0001) from age 12 to 17. Later midpoint of sleep correlated significantly with lower level of general, light and moderate to vigorous PA only at age 12 (all p <0.05) but not at age 17 (all p >= 0.36). However, those with circadian preference more towards eveningness at age 17 had more sedentary behavior (p <0.01) and a lower level of general (p = 0.01), light (p <0.01) and moderate to vigorous PA (p <0.05). They also had poorer subjective assessment of their fitness level (p <0.01) and they exercised less (all p = 0.13). Conclusions: Findings of this study highlighted the influence of circadian preference on physical activity behavior in adolescence. Self-assessed circadian preference towards eveningness associated with lower PA and greater decline of it during adolescence. Furthermore, PA declined significantly especially among boys from early to late adolescence. Interventions encouraging physical activity should target specifically evening-oriented adolescents. (C) 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.