Browsing by Subject "Planetary health"

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  • Halonen, Jaana I.; Erhola, Marina; Furman, Eeva; Haahtela, Tari; Jousilahti, Pekka; Barouki, Robert; Bergman, Åke; Billo, Nils E.; Fuller, Richard; Haines, Andrew; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; Krauze, Kinga; Lanki, Timo; Vicente, Joana Lobo; Messerli, Peter; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Paloniemi, Riikka; Peters, Annette; Posch, Karl-Heinz; Timonen, Pekka; Vermeulen, Roel; Virtanen, Suvi M.; Bousquet, Jean; Antó, Josep M. (2021)
    In 2015, the Rockefeller Foundation-Lancet Commission launched a report introducing a novel approach called Planetary Health and proposed a concept, a strategy and a course of action. To discuss the concept of Planetary Health in the context of Europe, a conference entitled: “Europe That Protects: Safeguarding Our Planet, Safeguarding Our Health” was held in Helsinki in December 2019. The conference participants concluded with a need for action to support Planetary Health during the 2020s. The Helsinki Declaration emphasizes the urgency to act as scientific evidence shows that human activities are causing climate change, biodiversity loss, land degradation, overuse of natural resources and pollution. They threaten the health and safety of human kind. Global, regional, national, local and individual initiatives are called for and multidisciplinary and multisectorial actions and measures are needed. A framework for an action plan is suggested that can be modified for local needs. Accordingly, a shift from fragmented approaches to policy and practice towards systematic actions will promote human health and health of the planet. Systems thinking will feed into conserving nature and biodiversity, and into halting climate change. The Planetary Health paradigm ‒ the health of human civilization and the state of natural systems on which it depends ‒ must become the driver for all policies.
  • Bousquet, Jean; Anto, Josep M.; Haahtela, Tari; Jousilahti, Pekka; Erhola, Marina; Basagana, Xavier; Czarlewski, Wienczyslawa; Odemyr, Mikaela; Palkonen, Susanna; Sofiev, Mikael; Velasco, Cesar; Bedbrook, Anna; Delgado, Rodrigo; Kouznetsov, Rostislav; Mäkelä, Mika; Palamarchuk, Yuliia; Saarinen, Kimmo; Tommila, Erja; Valovirta, Erkka; Vasankari, Tuula; Zuberbier, Torsten; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Benveniste, Samuel; Mathieu-Dupas, Eve; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Picard, Robert; Zeng, Stephane; Ayache, Julia; Calves Venturos, Nuria; Micheli, Yann; Jullian-Desayes, Ingrid; Laune, Daniel (2020)
    In December 2019, a conference entitled "Europe That Protects: Safeguarding Our Planet, Safeguarding Our Health" was held in Helsinki. It was co-organized by the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, the Finnish Environment Institute and the European Commission, under the auspices of Finland's Presidency of the EU. As a side event, a symposium organized as the final POLLAR (Impact of air POLLution on Asthma and Rhinitis) meeting explored the digital transformation of health and care to sustain planetary health in airway diseases. The Finnish Allergy Programme collaborates with MASK (Mobile Airways Sentinel NetworK) and can be considered as a proof-of-concept to impact Planetary Health. The Good Practice of DG Sante (The Directorate-General for Health and Food Safety) on digitally-enabled, patient-centred care pathways is in line with the objectives of the Finnish Allergy Programme. The ARIACARE-Digital network has been deployed in 25 countries. It represents an example of the digital cross-border exchange of real-world data and experience with the aim to improve patient care. The integration of information technology tools for climate, weather, air pollution and aerobiology in mobile Health applications will enable the development of an alert system. Citizens will thus be informed about personal environmental threats, which may also be linked to indicators of Planetary Health and sustainability. The digital transformation of the public health policy was also proposed, following the experience of the Agency for Health Quality and Assessment of Catalonia (AQuAS).
  • Shrivastava, Paul; Raivio, Kari; Kasuga, Fumiko; Tewksbury, Joshua; Haines, Andy; Daszak, Peter (BioMed Central, 2016)
    Abstract Future Earth is an international research platform providing the knowledge and support to accelerate our transformations to a sustainable world. Future Earth 2025 Vision identified eight key focal challenges, and challenge #6 is to “Improve human health by elucidating, and finding responses to, the complex interactions amongst environmental change, pollution, pathogens, disease vectors, ecosystem services, and people’s livelihoods, nutrition and well-being.” Several studies, including the Rockefeller Foundation/Lancet Planetary Health Commission Report of 2015, the World Health Organization/Convention on Biological Diversity report and those by oneHEALTH (former ecoHEALTH), have been conducted over the last 30 years. Knowledge-Action Networks (KANs) are the frameworks to apply Future Earth principles of research to related activities that respond to societal challenges. Future Earth Health Knowledge-Action Network will connect health researchers with other natural and social scientists, health and environmental policy professionals and leaders in government, the private sector and civil society to provide research-based solutions based on better, integrated understanding of the complex interactions between a changing global environment and human health. It will build regional capacity to enhance resilience, protect the environment and avert serious threats to health and will also contribute to achieving Sustainable Development Goals. In addition to the initial partners, Future Earth Health Knowledge-Action Network will further nourish collaboration with other on-going, leading research programmes outside Future Earth, by encouraging them in active participation.
  • Haahtela, Tari; von Hertzen, Leena; Anto, Josep M.; Bai, Chunxue; Baigenzhin, Abay; Bateman, Eric D.; Behera, Digambar; Bennoor, Kazi; Camargos, Paulo; Chavannes, Niels; de Sousa, Jaime Correia; Cruz, Alvaro; Teixeira, Maria Do Ceu; Erhola, Marina; Furman, Eeva; Gemicioglu, Bilun; Diaz, Sandra Gonzalez; Hellings, Peter W.; Jousilahti, Pekka; Khaltaev, Nikolai; Kolek, Vitezslav; Kuna, Piotr; La Grutta, Stefania; Le Thi Tuyet Lan; Maglakelidze, Tamaz; Masjedi, Mohamed R.; Mihaltan, Florin; Mohammad, Yousser; Nunes, Elizabete; Nyberg, Arvid; Quel, Jorge; Rosado-Pinto, Jose; Sagara, Hironori; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Schraufnagel, Dean; Sooronbaev, Talant; Eldin, Mohamed Tag; To, Teresa; Valiulis, Arunas; Varghese, Cherian; Vasankari, Tuula; Viegi, Giovanni; Winders, Tonya; Yanez, Anahi; Yorgancioglu, Arzu; Yusuf, Osman; Bousquet, Jean; Billo, Nils E. (2019)
    Background: The Nature Step to Respiratory Health was the overarching theme of the 12th General Meeting of the Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD) in Helsinki, August 2018. New approaches are needed to improve respiratory health and reduce premature mortality of chronic diseases by 30% till 2030 (UN Sustainable Development Goals, SDGs). Planetary health is defined as the health of human civilization and the state of the natural systems on which it depends. Planetary health and human health are interconnected, and both need to be considered by individuals and governments while addressing several SDGs. Results: The concept of the Nature Step has evolved from innovative research indicating, how changed lifestyle in urban surroundings reduces contact with biodiverse environments, impoverishes microbiota, affects immune regulation and increases risk of NCDs. The Nature Step calls for strengthening connections to nature. Physical activity in natural environments should be promoted, use of fresh vegetables, fruits and water increased, and consumption of sugary drinks, tobacco and alcohol restricted. Nature relatedness should be part of everyday life and especially emphasized in the care of children and the elderly. Taking "nature" to modern cities in a controlled way is possible but a challenge for urban planning, nature conservation, housing, traffic arrangements, energy production, and importantly for supplying and distributing food. Actions against the well-known respiratory risk factors, air pollution and smoking, should be taken simultaneously. Conclusions: In Finland and elsewhere in Europe, successful programmes have been implemented to reduce the burden of respiratory disorders and other NCDs. Unhealthy behaviour can be changed by well-coordinated actions involving all stakeholders. The growing public health concern caused by NCDs in urban surroundings cannot be solved by health care alone; a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory.
  • Haahtela, Tari; von Hertzen, Leena; Anto, Josep M; Bai, Chunxue; Baigenzhin, Abay; Bateman, Eric D; Behera, Digambar; Bennoor, Kazi; Camargos, Paulo; Chavannes, Niels; de Sousa, Jaime C; Cruz, Alvaro; Do Céu Teixeira, Maria; Erhola, Marina; Furman, Eeva; Gemicioğlu, Bilun; Gonzalez Diaz, Sandra; Hellings, Peter W; Jousilahti, Pekka; Khaltaev, Nikolai; Kolek, Vitezslav; Kuna, Piotr; La Grutta, Stefania; Lan, Le T T; Maglakelidze, Tamaz; Masjedi, Mohamed R; Mihaltan, Florin; Mohammad, Yousser; Nunes, Elizabete; Nyberg, Arvid; Quel, Jorge; Rosado-Pinto, Jose; Sagara, Hironori; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Schraufnagel, Dean; Sooronbaev, Talant; Tag Eldin, Mohamed; To, Teresa; Valiulis, Arunas; Varghese, Cherian; Vasankari, Tuula; Viegi, Giovanni; Winders, Tonya; Yañez, Anahi; Yorgancioğlu, Arzu; Yusuf, Osman; Bousquet, Jean; Billo, Nils E (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background The Nature Step to Respiratory Health was the overarching theme of the 12th General Meeting of the Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD) in Helsinki, August 2018. New approaches are needed to improve respiratory health and reduce premature mortality of chronic diseases by 30% till 2030 (UN Sustainable Development Goals, SDGs). Planetary health is defined as the health of human civilization and the state of the natural systems on which it depends. Planetary health and human health are interconnected, and both need to be considered by individuals and governments while addressing several SDGs. Results The concept of the Nature Step has evolved from innovative research indicating, how changed lifestyle in urban surroundings reduces contact with biodiverse environments, impoverishes microbiota, affects immune regulation and increases risk of NCDs. The Nature Step calls for strengthening connections to nature. Physical activity in natural environments should be promoted, use of fresh vegetables, fruits and water increased, and consumption of sugary drinks, tobacco and alcohol restricted. Nature relatedness should be part of everyday life and especially emphasized in the care of children and the elderly. Taking “nature” to modern cities in a controlled way is possible but a challenge for urban planning, nature conservation, housing, traffic arrangements, energy production, and importantly for supplying and distributing food. Actions against the well-known respiratory risk factors, air pollution and smoking, should be taken simultaneously. Conclusions In Finland and elsewhere in Europe, successful programmes have been implemented to reduce the burden of respiratory disorders and other NCDs. Unhealthy behaviour can be changed by well-coordinated actions involving all stakeholders. The growing public health concern caused by NCDs in urban surroundings cannot be solved by health care alone; a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory.