Browsing by Subject "QUESTIONNAIRE SURVEY"

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  • Salonen, Milla; Sulkama, Sini; Mikkola, Salla; Puurunen, Jenni; Hakanen, Emma; Tiira, Katriina; Araujo, César; Lohi, Hannes (2020)
    Behaviour problems and anxieties in dogs decrease their quality of life and may lead to relinquishment or euthanasia. Considering the large number of pet dogs and the commonness of these problematic behaviours, a better understanding of the epidemiology and related molecular and environmental factors is needed. We have here studied the prevalence, comorbidity, and breed specificity of seven canine anxiety-like traits: noise sensitivity, fearfulness, fear of surfaces and heights, inattention/impulsivity, compulsion, separation related behaviour and aggression with an online behaviour questionnaire answered by dog owners. Our results show that noise sensitivity is the most common anxiety-related trait with a prevalence of 32% in 13,700 Finnish pet dogs. Due to the high prevalence of noise sensitivity and fear, they were the most common comorbidities. However, when comparing the relative risk, the largest risk ratios were seen between hyperactivity/inattention, separation related behaviour and compulsion, and between fear and aggression. Furthermore, dog breeds showed large differences in prevalence of all anxiety-related traits, suggesting a strong genetic contribution. As a result, selective breeding focusing on behaviour may reduce the prevalence of canine anxieties. Anxious animals may suffer from chronic stress and thus, modified breeding policies could improve the welfare of our companion dogs.
  • Tommiska, Pihla; Lonnrot, Kimmo; Raj, Rahul; Luostarinen, Teemu; Kivisaari, Riku (2019)
    BACKGROUND: A number of randomized controlled trials have shown the benefit of drain placement in the operative treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH); however, few reports have described real-life results after adoption of drain placement into clinical practice. We report the results following a change in practice at Helsinki University Hospital from no drain to subdural drain (SD) placement after burr hole craniostomy for CSDH. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective observational study of consecutive patients undergoing burr hole craniostomy for CSDH. We compared outcomes between a 6-month period when SD placement was arbitrary (Julye December 2015) and a period when SD placement for 48 hours was routine (July-December 2017). Our primary outcome of interest was recurrence of CSDH necessitating reoperation within 6 months. Patient outcomes, infections, and other complications were assessed as well. RESULTS: A total of 161 patients were included, comprising 71 (44%) in the drain group and 90 (56%) in the non-drain group. There were no significant differences in age, comorbidities, history of trauma, or use of antithrombotic agents between the 2 groups (P > 0.05 for all). Recurrence within 6 months occurred in 18% of patients in the non-drain group, compared with 6% in the drain group (odds ratio, 0.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-0.87; P = 0.028). There were no differences in neurologic outcomes (P = 0.72), mortality (P = 0.55), infection rate (P = 0.96), or other complications (P = 0.20). CONCLUSIONS: The change in practice from no drain to use of an SD after burr hole craniostomy for CSDH effectively reduced the 6-month recurrence rate with no effect on patient outcomes, infections, or other complications.