Browsing by Subject "QUICK RETURNS"

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  • Karhula, Kati; Hakola, Tarja; Koskinen, Aki; Lallukka, Tea; Ojajarvi, Anneli; Puttonen, Sampsa; Oksanen, Tuula; Rahkonen, Ossi; Ropponen, Annina; Härmä, Mikko (2021)
    We studied whether implementing binding ergonomic shift-scheduling rules change ageing (>= 45 years) social and healthcare employees' (mean age 52.5 years, 95% women) working-hour characteristics (e.g. weekly working hours, number and length of night shifts, and short shift intervals) and sleep. We compared an intervention group (n = 253) to a control group (n = 1,234) by survey responses (baseline 2007/2008, follow-up 2012) and objective working-hour characteristics (intervention group n = 159, control group n = 379) from 91 days preceding the surveys. Changes in working-hour characteristics were analysed with repeated measures general linear models. The fully adjusted model (sociodemographics and full-/part-time work) showed that proportion of short shift intervals (= 9 hr; odds ratio [OR] 5.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.21-13.80), and lower odds of short sleep (
  • Harma, Mikko; Karhula, Kati; Ropponen, Annina; Puttonen, Sampsa; Koskinen, Aki; Ojajarvi, Anneli; Hakola, Tarja; Pentti, Jaana; Oksanen, Tuula; Vahtera, Jussi; Kivimaki, Mika (2018)
    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine whether changes in work shifts and shift intensity are related to changes in difficulties to fall asleep, fatigue, and sleep length. Methods Questionnaire responses of hospital employees (N=7727, 93% women) in 2008, 2012, 2014 and 2015 were linked to daily-based records of working hours during three months preceding each survey. We used conditional logistic regression and longitudinal fixed-effects analyses to investigate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each 25% within-individual change in the proportion of working hour characteristics in relation to changes in fatigue, difficulties to fall asleep, and 24-hour sleep length. Results Change in night but not in morning or evening shifts was associated with parallel changes in odds for longer sleep length (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.28-1.64) and fatigue during free days (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.16-1.64). Similarly, short shift intervals and having >2 but not >4 consecutive night shifts were associated with increased odds of fatigue during work and difficulties to fall asleep (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.19-1.72 and OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.05-1.19, respectively). Among workers aged >= 50 years, the associations were the strongest between night shifts and longer sleep (OR 2.24,95% CI 1.52-3.81) and between higher proportion of short shift intervals and fatigue during free days (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.10-2.54). Conclusions Among shift workers with fatigue or sleep problems, decreasing the proportion of night shifts and quick returns and giving preference to quickly forward-rotating shift systems may reduce fatigue.
  • Tucker, P; Harma, M; Ojajarvi, A; Kivimaki, M; Leineweber, C; Oksanen, T; Salo, P; Vahtera, J (2021)
    We examined whether working rotating shifts, with or without night work, is associated with the purchase of prescribed sleep medication, and whether the association is dependent on age. Data were obtained from a longitudinal cohort study of Finnish public sector employees who responded to questions on work schedule and background characteristics in 2000, 2004 and 2008. The data were linked to national register data on redeemed prescriptions of hypnotic and sedative medications, with up to 11 years of follow-up. Age stratified Cox proportional hazard regression models were computed to examine incident use of medication comparing two groups of rotating shift workers (those working shifts that included night shifts and those whose schedules did not include night shifts) with day workers who worked in a similar range of occupations. Shift work with night shifts was associated with increased use of sleep medication in all age groups, after adjustments for sex, occupational status, marital status, alcohol consumption, smoking and physical activity levels (hazard ratio [HR], [95% confidence interval, CI] 1.14 [1.01-1.28] for age group = 50 years). Shift work without nights was associated with medication use in the two older age groups (HR [95% CI] 1.14 [1.01-1.29] and 1.17 [1.05-1.31] for age groups 40-49 years and >50 years, respectively). These findings suggest that circadian disruption and older age puts rotating shift workers, and especially those who work nights, at increased risk of developing clinically significant levels of sleep problems.