Browsing by Subject "RADIATION"

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  • Purisha, Zenith; Karhula, Sakari S.; Ketola, Juuso H.; Rimpeläinen, Juho; Nieminen, Miika T.; Saarakkala, Simo; Kröger, Heikki; Siltanen, Samuli (2019)
    X-ray tomography is a reliable tool for determining the inner structure of 3-D object with penetrating X-rays. However, traditional reconstruction methods, such as Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK), require dense angular sampling in the data acquisition phase leading to long measurement times, especially in X-ray micro-tomography to obtain high-resolution scans. Acquiring less data using greater angular steps is an obvious way for speeding up the process and avoiding the need to save huge data sets. However, computing 3-D reconstruction from such a sparsely sampled data set is difficult because the measurement data are usually contaminated by errors, and linear measurement models do not contain sufficient information to solve the problem in practice. An automatic regularization method is proposed for robust reconstruction, based on enforcing sparsity in the 3-D shearlet transform domain. The inputs of the algorithm are the projection data and a priori known expected degree of sparsity, denoted as 0 <C-pr
  • Gielen, Bert; Acosta, Manuel; Altimir, Nuria; Buchmann, Nina; Cescatte, Alessandro; Ceschia, Eric; Fleck, Stefan; Hortnagal, Lukas; Klumpp, Katja; Kolari, Pasi; Lohile, Annalea; Loustau, Denis; Maranon-Jimenez, Sara; Manisp, Languy; Matteucci, Giorgio; Merbold, Lutz; Metzger, Christine; Moureaux, Christine; Montagnani, Leonardo; Nilsson, Mats B.; Osborne, Bruce; Papale, Dario; Pavelka, Marian; Saunders, Matthew; Simioni, Guillaume; Soudani, Kamel; Sonnentag, Oliver; Tallec, Tiphaine; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Peichl, Matthias; Pokorny, Radek; Vincke, Caroline; Wohljahrt, Georg (2018)
    The Integrated Carbon Observation System is a Pan-European distributed research infrastructure that has as its main goal to monitor the greenhouse gas balance of Europe. The ecosystem component of Integrated Carbon Observation System consists of a multitude of stations where the net greenhouse gas exchange is monitored continuously by eddy covariance measurements while, in addition many other measurements are carried out that are a key to an understanding of the greenhouse gas balance. Amongst them are the continuous meteorological measurements and a set of non-continuous measurements related to vegetation. The latter include Green Area Index, aboveground biomass and litter biomass. The standardized methodology that is used at the Integrated Carbon Observation System ecosystem stations to monitor these vegetation related variables differs between the ecosystem types that are represented within the network, whereby in this paper we focus on forests, grasslands, croplands and mires. For each of the variables and ecosystems a spatial and temporal sampling design was developed so that the variables can be monitored in a consistent way within the ICOS network. The standardisation of the methodology to collect Green Area Index, above ground biomass and litter biomass and the methods to evaluate the quality of the collected data ensures that all stations within the ICOS ecosystem network produce data sets with small and similar errors, which allows for inter-comparison comparisons across the Integrated Carbon Observation System ecosystem network.
  • Kröger, Björn (2018)
    Near-equatorial peak diversities are a prominent first-order feature of today's latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG), but were not a persistent pattern throughout geological time. In an analysis of Ordovician (485-444 Ma) fossil occurrences, an equatorward shift of the latitudinal diversity peak can be detected. A modern-type LDG and out-of-the-tropics range shift pattern were synchronously established during emerging icehouse conditions at the climax of the Great Ordovician Biodiversity Event. The changes in the LDG pattern and range shift trends can be best explained as a consequence of global cooling during the Middle Ordovician and of diversification in the tropical realm following a greenhouse period with temperatures too hot to support diverse tropical marine life. These results substantiate a fundamental role of temperature changes in establishing global first-order diversity patterns.
  • Vihma, Timo; Kilpeläinen, Tiina; Manninen, Miina; Sjöblom, Anna; Jakobson, Erko; Palo, Timo; Jaagus, Jaak; Maturilli, Marion (2011)
  • Kainulainen, Kimmo; Leskinen, Juuso; Nurmi, Sami; Takahashi, Tomo (2017)
    We investigate the CMB mu distortion in models where two uncorrelated sources contribute to primordial perturbations. We parameterise each source by an amplitude, tilt, running and running of the running. We perform a detailed analysis of the distribution signal as function of the model parameters, highlighting the differences compared to single-source models. As a specific example, we also investigate the mixed inflaton-curvaton scenario. We find that the mu distortion could efficiently break degeneracies of curvaton parameters especially when combined with future sensitivity of probing the tensor-to-scalar ratio r. For example, assuming bounds mu <0.5 x 10(-8) and r <0.01, the curvaton contribution should either vanish or the curvaton should dominate primordial perturbations and its slow-roll parameter eta(chi) is constrained to the interval -0.007 <eta(chi) <0.045.
  • Saarikko, Anne; Mellanen, Eero; Kuusela, Linda; Leikola, Junnu; Karppinen, Atte; Autti, Taina; Virtanen, Pekka; Brandstack, Nina (2020)
    Summary Purpose Black Bone (BB) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a nonionizing imaging method and a recent alternative to computed tomography (CT) in the examination of cranial deformities. The purpose of this study was to compare BB-MRI and routine 3D-CT in the preoperative evaluation of patients with craniosynostosis. Methods At our center, we have routinely performed preoperative CT of the skull and brain MRI for patients with clinical suspicion of craniosynostosis. We recently changed our MRI protocol into one that includes sequences for the evaluation of both brain anatomy and skull bone and sutures by BB-MRI. A semi-automatic skull segmentation algorithm was developed to facilitate visualization. Both BB-MRI and 3D-CT were performed on 9 patients with clinical craniosynostosis, and the images were evaluated by two craniofacial surgeons, one pediatric neurosurgeon, and two neuroradiologists. Results We obtained informative 3D images using BB-MRI. Six (6/9) patients had scaphocephaly, 1 (1/9) patient had unicoronal synostosis, and 2 (2/9) patients had lambdoid synostosis. The affected synostotic sutures could be identified both by BB-MRI and by 3D-CT in all patients. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability for rating the calvarial sutures was high. However, the reliability for rating the intracranial impressions was low by both imaging methods. Conclusion BB-MRI is an alternative to 3D-CT in the preoperative evaluation of patients with craniosynostosis. BB-MRI provides information not only on cranial sutures and intracranial impressions but also on the brain structure in one imaging session. This method can replace ionizing radiation-based methods in analyzing skull deformities.
  • Sporre, Moa K.; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Håkansson, Nina; Thoss, Anke; Swietlicki, Erik; Petäjä, Tuukka (2016)
    Cloud retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments aboard the satellites Terra and Aqua and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard the Suomi-NPP satellite are evaluated using a combination of ground-based instruments providing vertical profiles of clouds. The ground-based measurements are obtained from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) programme mobile facility, which was deployed in Hyytiala, Finland, between February and September 2014 for the Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) campaign. The satellite cloud parameters cloud top height (CTH) and liquid water path (LWP) are compared with ground-based CTH obtained from a cloud mask created using lidar and radar data and LWP acquired from a multi-channel microwave radiometer. Clouds from all altitudes in the atmosphere are investigated. The clouds are diagnosed as single or multiple layer using the ground-based cloud mask. For single-layer clouds, satellites overestimated CTH by 326 (14 %) on average. When including multilayer clouds, satellites underestimated CTH by on average 169 m (5.8 %). MODIS collection 6 overestimated LWP by on average 13 g m(-2) (11 %). Interestingly, LWP for MODIS collection 5.1 is slightly overestimated by Aqua (4.56 %) but is underestimated by Terra (14.3 %). This underestimation may be attributed to a known issue with a drift in the reflectance bands of the MODIS instrument on Terra. This evaluation indicates that the satellite cloud parameters selected show reasonable agreement with their ground-based counterparts over Finland, with minimal influence from the large solar zenith angle experienced by the satellites in this high-latitude location.
  • Djurabekova, F.; Fridlund, C.; Nordlund, K. (2020)
    We present molecular dynamics simulations of atomic mixing over a Si/SiO2 heterostructure interface, induced by focused Ne+ and broad Si(+ )ion-beam irradiations, using a speed-up scheme that significantly reduces the relaxation time of the cascading recoils. To assess the qualitative reliance of the chosen method, two different potential models for Si-O, Si-Si, and O-O interactions were used: the Stillinger-Weber-like Watanabe-Samela potential and the Tersoff-like Munetoh potential. Furthermore, the molecular dynamics simulations were assessed by simulating a similar case, at a total fluence of 1 x10(15) cm(-2), with the binary collision approximation. The same general atomic density profile distributions were achieved with both models; however, the binary collision approach showed shallower penetration of Si into the SiO(2 )layer. Coordination analysis of the molecular dynamics results provides strong evidence that ion mixing at high fluences leads to coordination defects, which will affect the electronic properties of the structures unless removed with annealing.
  • Andritsch, Elisabeth; Beishon, Marc; Bielack, Stefan; Bonvalot, Sylvie; Casali, Paolo; Crul, Mirjam; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Donatih, Davide Maria; Douis, Hassan; Haas, Rick; Hogendoorn, Pancras; Kozhaeva, Olga; Lavender, Verna; Lovey, Jozsef; Negrouk, Anastassia; Pereira, Philippe; Roca, Pierre; de Lempdes, Godelieve Rochette; Saarto, Tiina; van Berck, Bert; Vassal, Gilles; Wartenberg, Markus; Yared, Wendy; Costa, Alberto; Naredi, Peter (2017)
    Background: ECCO essential requirements for quality cancer care (ERQCC) are checklists and explanations of organisation and actions that are necessary to give high-quality care to patients who have a specific tumour type. They are written by European experts representing all disciplines involved in cancer care. ERQCC papers give oncology teams, patients, policymakers and managers an overview of the elements needed in any healthcare system to provide high quality of care throughout the patient journey. References are made to clinical guidelines and other resources where appropriate, and the focus is on care in Europe. Sarcoma: essential requirements for quality care Sarcomas - which can be classified into soft tissue and bone sarcomas - are rare, but all rare cancers make up more than 20% of cancers in Europe, and there are substantial inequalities in access to high-quality care. Sarcomas, of which there are many subtypes, comprise a particularly complex and demanding challenge for healthcare systems and providers. This paper presents essential requirements for quality cancer care of soft tissue sarcomas in adults and bone sarcomas. High-quality care must only be carried out in specialised sarcoma centres (including paediatric cancer centres) which have both a core multidisciplinary team and an extended team of allied professionals, and which are subject to quality and audit procedures. Access to such units is far from universal in all European countries. It is essential that, to meet European aspirations for high-quality comprehensive cancer control, healthcare organisations implement the requirements in this paper, paying particular attention to multidisciplinarity and patient-centred pathways from diagnosis and follow-up, to treatment, to improve survival and quality of life for patients. Conclusion: Taken together, the information presented in this paper provides a comprehensive description of the essential requirements for establishing a high-quality service for soft tissue sarcomas in adults and bone sarcomas. The ECCO expert group is aware that it is not possible to propose a 'one size fits all' system for all countries, but urges that access to multidisciplinary teams is guaranteed to all patients with sarcoma. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
  • Harju, Jorma; Pineda, Jaime E.; Vasyunin, Anton; Caselli, Paola; Offner, Stella S. R.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Juvela, Mika; Sipilä, Olli; Faure, Alexandre; Le Gal, Romane; Hily-Blant, Pierre; Alves, Joao; Bizzocchi, Luca; Burkert, Andreas; Chen, Hope; Friesen, Rachel K.; Guesten, Rolf; Myers, Philip C.; Punanova, Anna; Rist, Claire; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schlemmer, Stephan; Shirley, Yancy; Spezzano, Silvia; Vastel, Charlotte; Wiesenfeld, Laurent (2020)
    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array maps of the starless molecular cloud core Ophiuchus/H-MM1 in the lines of deuterated ammonia (ortho-NH2D), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur monoxide (SO). The dense core is seen in NH2D emission, whereas the CH3OH and SO distributions form a halo surrounding the core. Because methanol is formed on grain surfaces, its emission highlights regions where desorption from grains is particularly efficient. Methanol and sulfur monoxide are most abundant in a narrow zone that follows the eastern side of the core. This side is sheltered from the stronger external radiation field coming from the west. We show that photodissociation on the illuminated side can give rise to an asymmetric methanol distribution but that the stark contrast observed in H-MM1 is hard to explain without assuming enhanced desorption on the shaded side. The region of the brightest emission has a wavy structure that rolls up at one end. This is the signature of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability occurring in sheared flows. We suggest that in this zone, methanol and sulfur are released as a result of grain-grain collisions induced by shear vorticity.
  • Lindholm, C.; Pekkarinen, A.; Sipilä, O.; Manninen, A. -L.; Lehtinen, M.; Siiskonen, T. (2020)
    The eye lens exposure among 16 technicians in two nuclear medicine departments at university hospitals in Finland was investigated by measuring the operational quantity H-p(3) using EYE-D dosemeters. For all workers, the annual mean H-p(3) was estimated to be 1.1 mSv (max. 3.9 mSv). The relation between H-p(3) to routinely monitored personal dose equivalent H-p(10) was clearly correlated. Considering individual dose measurement periods (2-4 weeks), the H-p(3)/H-p(10) ratio was 0.7 (Pearson's coefficient r = 0.90, p <0.001, variation of ratio 0.1-2.3). The variation decreased considerably with increasing H-p(10) (sigma(2) = 0.04 vs. 0.43 for H-p(10) > 0.1 mSv vs. <0.1 mSv, respectively), i.e. higher Hp(10) predicts H-p(3) more reliably. Moreover, annual H-p(10) data from national dose register during 2009-2018 were used to derive the annual H-p(3) applying the H-p(3)/H-p(10) ratio. The data from Finnish nuclear medicine departments imply that routine measurements of H-p(3) among nuclear medicine technicians are not justified.
  • CORE Collaboration; Melin, J. -B.; Kiiveri, K.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lindholm, V.; Väliviita, J. (2018)
    We examine the cosmological constraints that can be achieved with a galaxy cluster survey with the future CORE space mission. Using realistic simulations of the millimeter sky, produced with the latest version of the Planck Sky Model, we characterize the CORE cluster catalogues as a function of the main mission performance parameters. We pay particular attention to telescope size, key to improved angular resolution, and discuss the comparison and the complementarity of CORE with ambitious future ground-based CMB experiments that could be deployed in the next decade. A possible CORE mission concept with a 150 cm diameter primary mirror can detect of the order of 50,000 clusters through the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE). The total yield increases (decreases) by 25% when increasing (decreasing) the mirror diameter by 30 cm. The 150 cm telescope configuration will detect the most massive clusters (> 10(14) M-circle dot) at redshift z > 1.5 over the whole sky, although the exact number above this redshift is tied to the uncertain evolution of the cluster SZE flux-mass relation; assuming self-similar evolution, CORE will detect similar to 500 clusters at redshift z > 1.5. This changes to 800 (200) when increasing (decreasing) the mirror size by 30 cm. CORE will be able to measure individual cluster halo masses through lensing of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies with a 1-sigma sensitivity of 4 x 10(14)M(circle dot), for a 120 cm aperture telescope, and 10(14)M(circle dot) for a 180 cm one. From the ground, we estimate that, for example, a survey with about 150,000 detectors at the focus of 350 cm telescopes observing 65% of the sky would be shallower than CORE and detect about 11,000 clusters, while a survey with the same number of detectors observing 25% of sky with a 10 m telescope is expected to be deeper and to detect about 70,000 clusters. When combined with the latter, CORE would reach a limiting mass of M-500 similar to 2-3 x 10(13)M(circle dot) and detect 220,000 clusters (5 sigma detection limit). Cosmological constraints from CORE cluster counts alone are competitive with other scheduled large scale structure surveys in the 2020's for measuring the dark energy equation of-state parameters w(0) and w(a) (sigma(w0) = 0.28, sigma(wa) = 0.31). In combination with primary CMB constraints, CORE cluster counts can further reduce these error bars on w(0) and w(a) to 0.05 and 0.13 respectively, and constrain the sum of the neutrino masses, Sigma m(nu), to 39 meV (1 sigma). The wide frequency coverage of CORE, 60-600 GHz, will enable measurement of the relativistic thermal SZE by stacking clusters. Contamination by dust emission from the clusters, however, makes constraining the temperature of the intracluster medium difficult. The kinetic SZE pairwise momentum will be extracted with S/N = 70 in the foreground cleaned CMB map. Measurements of T-CMB (z) using CORE clusters will establish competitive constraints on the evolution of the CMB temperature: (1 + z)(1-beta), with an uncertainty of sigma(beta) less than or similar to 2.7 x 10(-3) at low redshift (z less than or similar to 1). The wide frequency coverage also enables clean extraction of a map of the diffuse SZE signal over the sky, substantially reducing contamination by foregrounds compared to the Planck SZE map extraction. Our analysis of the one-dimensional distribution of Compton-y values in the simulated map finds an order of magnitude improvement in constraints on sigma(8) over the Planck result, demonstrating the potential of this cosmological probe with CORE.
  • CORE Collaboration; Challinor, A.; Kiiveri, K.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lindholm, V.; Väliviita, J. (2018)
    Lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is now a well-developed probe of the clustering of the large-scale mass distribution over a broad range of redshifts. By exploiting the non-Gaussian imprints of lensing in the polarization of the CMB, the CORE mission will allow production of a clean map of the lensing deflections over nearly the full-sky. The number of high-SAN modes in this map will exceed current CMB lensing maps by a factor of 40, and the measurement will be sample-variance limited on all scales where linear theory is valid. Here, we summarise this mission product and discuss the science that will follow from its power spectrum and the cross-correlation with other clustering data. For example, the summed mass of neutrinos will be determined to an accuracy of 17 meV combining CORE lensing and CMB two-point information with contemporaneous measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillation feature in the clustering of galaxies, three times smaller than the minimum total mass allowed by neutrino oscillation measurements. Lensing has applications across many other science goals of CORE, including the search for B-mode polarization from primordial gravitational waves. Here, lens-induced B-modes will dominate over instrument noise, limiting constraints on the power spectrum amplitude of primordial gravitational waves. With lensing reconstructed by CORE, one can "delens" the observed polarization internally, reducing the lensing B-mode power by 60 %. This can be improved to 70 % by combining lensing and measurements of the cosmic infrared background from CORE, leading to an improvement of a factor of 2.5 in the error on the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves compared to no delensing (in the null hypothesis of no primordial B-modes). Lensing measurements from CORE will allow calibration of the halo masses of the tens of thousands of galaxy clusters that it will find, with constraints dominated by the clean polarization-based estimators. The 19 frequency channels proposed for CORE will allow accurate removal of Galactic emission from CMB maps. We present initial findings that show that residual Galactic foreground contamination will not be a significant source of bias for lensing power spectrum measurements with CORE.
  • Mattila, K.; Lehtinen, K.; Väisänen, P.; von Appen-Schnur, G.; Leinert, Ch. (2017)
    We present the method and observations for the measurement of the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) utilizing the shadowing effect of a dark cloud. We measure the surface brightness difference between the opaque cloud core and its unobscured surroundings. In the difference the large atmospheric and Zodiacal light components are eliminated and the only remaining foreground component is the scattered starlight from the cloud itself. Although much smaller, its separation is the key problem in the method. For its separation we use spectroscopy. While the scattered starlight has the characteristic Fraunhofer lines and 400 nm discontinuity, the EBL spectrum is smooth and without these features. Medium resolution spectrophotometry at lambda = 380-580 nm was performed with VLT/FORS at ESO of the surface brightness in and around the high-galactic-latitude dark cloud Lynds 1642. Besides the spectrum for the core with AV greater than or similar to 15 mag, further spectra were obtained for intermediate-opacity cloud positions. They are used as proxy for the spectrum of the impinging starlight spectrum and to facilitate the separation of the scattered starlight (cf. Paper II; Mattila et al.). Our spectra reach a precision of less than or similar to 0.5 x 10(-9) erg cm(-2) s(-1) sr(-1) angstrom(-1) as required to measure an EBL intensity in range of similar to 1 to a few times 10(-9) erg cm(-2) s(-1) sr(-1) angstrom(-1). Because all surface brightness components are measured using the same equipment, the method does not require unusually high absolute calibration accuracy, a condition that has been a problem for some previous EBL projects.
  • Rossini, Michele; Montreuil, Olivier; Grebennikov, Vasily; Tarasov, Sergei (2021)
    In this study, we test and corroborate the phylogenetic position of Heterosyphus within Helictopleurus using mitogenomes and nuclear loci. Our recent samplings revealed that males of the former Heterosyphus sicardi Paulian, 1975 (today under Helictopleurus d'Orbigny, 1915) have extraordinary bilateral clypeal horns which are exclusive within the genus. We provide a taxonomic review of the fungicola species group of Helictopleurus and discuss the systematic position of H. sicardi within the group. The male phenotype of H. sicardi is described and photographs of the body and genitalia of the members of the fungicola group are given, as well as a diagnostic key to species of the group. Helictopleurus fungicola peyrierasi is considered to be a distinct species within the genus (H. peyrierasi stat. rest.). Helictopleurus pluristriatus d'Orbigny, 1915 syn. nov. is established as a junior synonym of H. fungicola (Fairmaire, 1899).
  • Weir, David J. (2018)
    We review the production of gravitational waves by an electroweak first-order phase transition. The resulting signal is a good candidate for detection at next-generation gravitational wave detectors, such as LISA. Detection of such a source of gravitational waves could yield information about physics beyond the Standard Model that is complementary to that accessible to current and near-future collider experiments. We summarize efforts to simulate and model the phase transition and the resulting production of gravitational waves. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue 'Higgs cosmology'.
  • Cutting, Daniel; Hindmarsh, Mark; Weir, David J. (2018)
    We conduct large scale numerical simulations of gravitational wave production at a first-order vacuum phase transition. We find a power law for the gravitational wave power spectrum at high wave number which falls off as k(-1.5) rather than the k(-1) produced by the envelope approximation. The peak of the power spectrum is shifted to slightly lower wave numbers from that of the envelope approximation. The envelope approximation reproduces our results for the peak power less well, agreeing only to within an order of magnitude. After the bubbles finish colliding, the scalar field oscillates around the true vacuum. An additional feature is produced in the UV of the gravitational wave power spectrum, and this continues to grow linearly until the end of our simulation. The additional feature peaks at a length scale close to the bubble wall thickness and is shown to have a negligible contribution to the energy in gravitational waves, providing the scalar field mass is much smaller than the Planck mass.
  • Cutting, Daniel; Escartin, Elba Granados; Hindmarsh, Mark; Weir, David J. (2021)
    In a vacuum first-order phase transition, gravitational waves are generated from collision of bubbles of the true vacuum. The spectrum from such collisions takes the form of a broken power law. We consider a toy model for such a phase transition, where the dynamics of the scalar field depends on a single parameter (lambda) over bar, which controls how thin the bubble wall is at nucleation and how close to degenerate the vacua are relative to the barrier. We extend on our previous work by performing a series of simulations with a range of (lambda) over bar. The peak of the gravitational-wave power spectrum varies by up to a factor of 1.3, which is probably an unobservable effect. We find that the UV power law in the gravitational-wave spectrum becomes steeper as (lambda) over bar -> 0, varying between k(-1.4) and k(-2.2) for the (lambda) over bar. considered. This provides some evidence that the form of the underlying effective potential of a vacuum first-order phase transition could be determined from the gravitational-wave spectrum it produces.
  • Mariotti, Lorenzo; Huarancca Reyes, Thais; Ramos-Diaz, Jose Martin; Jouppila, Kirsi; Guglielminetti, Lorenzo (2021)
    Increased ultraviolet-B (UV-B) due to global change can affect plant development and metabolism. Quinoa tolerates extreme conditions including high UV levels. However, the physiological mechanisms behind its abiotic stress tolerance are unclear, especially those related to UV-B. We previously demonstrated that 9.12 kJ m−2 d−1 may induce UV-B-specific signaling while 18.24 kJ m−2 d−1 promotes a UV-B-independent response. Here, we explored the effects of these UV-B doses on hormonal regulation linked to plant morphology and defense among diverse varieties. Changes in fluorescence parameters of photosystem II, flavonoids and hormones (indoleacetic acid (IAA), jasmonic acid (JA), abscisic acid (ABA) and salicylic acid (SA)) were surveyed under controlled conditions. Here, we showed that the sensitivity to short acute UV-B doses in varieties from different habitats is influenced by their parental lines and breeding time. UV-B sensitivity does not necessarily correlate with quinoa’s geographical distribution. The role of flavonoids in the UV-B response seems to be different depending on varieties. Moreover, we found that the extent of changes in JA and SA correlate with UV-B tolerance, while the increase of ABA was mainly related to UV-B stress.
  • Nordlund, Kai; Zinkle, Steven J.; Sand, Andrea E.; Granberg, Fredric; Averback, Robert S.; Stoller, Roger; Suzudo, Tomoaki; Malerba, Lorenzo; Banhart, Florian; Weber, William J.; Willaime, Francois; Dudarev, Sergei L.; Simeone, David (2018)
    Atomic collision processes are fundamental to numerous advanced materials technologies such as electron microscopy, semiconductor processing and nuclear power generation. Extensive experimental and computer simulation studies over the past several decades provide the physical basis for understanding the atomic-scale processes occurring during primary displacement events. The current international standard for quantifying this energetic particle damage, the Norgett-Robinson-Torrens displacements per atom (NRT-dpa) model, has nowadays several well-known limitations. In particular, the number of radiation defects produced in energetic cascades in metals is only similar to 1/3 the NRT-dpa prediction, while the number of atoms involved in atomic mixing is about a factor of 30 larger than the dpa value. Here we propose two new complementary displacement production estimators (athermal recombination corrected dpa, arc-dpa) and atomic mixing (replacements per atom, rpa) functions that extend the NRT-dpa by providing more physically realistic descriptions of primary defect creation in materials and may become additional standard measures for radiation damage quantification.