Browsing by Subject "RAIN-FOREST"

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  • Silva, Sofia Marques; Townsend Peterson, A.; Carneiro, Lincoln; Tortola Burlamaqui, Tiberio Cesar; Ribas, Camila C.; Sousa-Neves, Tiago; Miranda, Leonardo S.; Fernandes, Alexandre M.; d'Horta, Fernando M.; Araujo-Silva, Lucas Eduardo; Batista, Romina; Bandeira, Cinthia H. M. M.; Dantas, Sidnei M.; Ferreira, Mateus; Martins, Denise M.; Oliveira, Joiciane; Rocha, Taina C.; Sardelli, Carla H.; Thom, Gregory; Rego, Pericles Sena; Santos, Marcos Persio; Sequeira, Fernando; Vallinoto, Marcelo; Aleixo, Alexandre (2019)
    The Amazon is the primary source of Neotropical diversity and a nexus for discussions on processes that drive biotic diversification. Biogeographers have focused on the roles of rivers and Pleistocene climate change in explaining high rates of speciation. We combine phylogeographic and niche-based paleodistributional projections for 23 upland terra firme forest bird lineages from across the Amazon to derive a new model of regional biological diversification. We found that climate-driven refugial dynamics interact with dynamic riverine barriers to produce a dominant pattern: Older lineages in the wetter western and northern parts of the Amazon gave rise to lineages in the drier southern and eastern parts. This climate/drainage basin evolution interaction links landscape dynamics with biotic diversification and explains the east-west diversity gradients across the Amazon.
  • Brown, Hugh C. A.; Berninger, Frank A.; Larjavaara, Markku; Appiah, Mark (2020)
    High deforestation rates, especially in the tropics, currently result in the annual emission of large amounts of carbon, contributing to global climate change. There is therefore an urgent need to take actions to mitigate climate change both by slowing down deforestation and by initiating new sinks. Tropical forest plantations are generally thought to sequester carbon rapidly during the initial years but there is limited knowledge on their long-term potential. In this study, we assessed the carbon sequestration in old (42-47 years) timber plantations of Aucoumea klaineana, Cedrela odorata, Tarrietia utilis, and Terminalia ivorensis, and secondary forests of similar ages, by comparing their basal areas and above-ground carbon stocks (AGC) to that of nearby primary forests. Additionally, we estimated and compared timber volume and stumpage value in the three forest types. Systematic random sampling of ninety-three 20 m x 20 m plots in eleven forest sites (2 secondary forests, 2 primary forests, and 7 timber plantations) was undertaken to determine the effect of forest type on AGC, basal area, timber volume, and stumpage value. After 42 years of growth, mean AGC of the timber plantations (159.7 +/- 14.3 Mg ha(-1)) was similar to that of primary forests (173.0 +/- 25.1 Mg ha(-1)) and both were significantly higher than the mean AGC of the secondary forests (103.6 +/- 12.3 Mg ha(-1)). Mean basal area and timber volume of the timber plantations and secondary forests were similar to that of the primary forests, though in each case the timber plantations had significantly higher values compared to the secondary forests. Mean timber value of the plantations ($8577 ha(-1)) was significantly higher than both secondary ($1870 ha(-1)) and primary forests ($3112 ha(-1)). Contrary to our expectations, naturally regenerated trees (woody recruits) within the timber plantations had similar AGC levels, basal area, timber volume, and value compared to the secondary forests. Long-rotation tropical forest plantations under low-intensity management could achieve higher AGC levels and thus have higher climate change mitigation potential and timber values compared to naturally regenerated secondary forests, and are able to reach values similar to primary forests. Monoculture timber plantations could facilitate the successful colonization of their understoreys by native woody recruits that contribute considerably to stand AGC and timber values. Long-rotation forest plantations in the tropics therefore have a critical role to play in forest rehabilitation and climate change mitigation while having the potential to provide modest financial returns to landowners through selective harvesting of timber and/or payments for carbon sequestration.
  • Sun, Hui; Santalahti, Minna; Pumpanen, Jukka; Köster, Kajar; Berninger, Frank; Raffaello, Tommaso; Asiegbu, Fred O.; Heinonsalo, Jussi (2016)
    Soil microbial responses to fire are likely to change over the course of forest recovery. Investigations on long-term changes in bacterial dynamics following fire are rare. We characterized the soil bacterial communities across three different times post fire in a 2 to 152-year fire chronosequence by Illumina MiSeq sequencing, coupled with a functional gene array (GeoChip). The results showed that the bacterial diversity did not differ between the recently and older burned areas, suggesting a concomitant recovery in the bacterial diversity after fire. The differences in bacterial communities over time were mainly driven by the rare operational taxonomic units (OTUs <0.1%). Proteobacteria (39%), Acidobacteria (34%) and Actinobacteria (17%) were the most abundant phyla across all sites. Genes involved in C and N cycling pathways were present in all sites showing high redundancy in the gene profiles. However, hierarchical cluster analysis using gene signal intensity revealed that the sites with different fire histories formed separate clusters, suggesting potential differences in maintaining essential biogeochemical soil processes. Soil temperature, pH and water contents were the most important factors in shaping the bacterial community structures and function. This study provides functional insight on the impact of fire disturbance on soil bacterial community.
  • Wagner, Fabien Hubert; Herault, Bruno; Rossi, Vivien; Hilker, Thomas; Maeda, Eduardo Eiji; Sanchez, Alber; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Galvao, Lenio Soares; Wang, Yujie; Aragao, Luiz E. O. C. (2017)
    Our limited understanding of the climate controls on tropical forest seasonality is one of the biggest sources of uncertainty in modeling climate change impacts on terrestrial ecosystems. Combining leaf production, litterfall and climate observations from satellite and ground data in the Amazon forest, we show that seasonal variation in leaf production is largely triggered by climate signals, specifically, insolation increase (70.4% of the total area) and precipitation increase (29.6%). Increase of insolation drives leaf growth in the absence of water limitation. For these non-water-limited forests, the simultaneous leaf flush occurs in a sufficient proportion of the trees to be observed from space. While tropical cycles are generally defined in terms of dry or wet season, we show that for a large part of Amazonia the increase in insolation triggers the visible progress of leaf growth, just like during spring in temperate forests. The dependence of leaf growth initiation on climate seasonality may result in a higher sensitivity of these ecosystems to changes in climate than previously thought.
  • Prisle, Nonne L.; Lin, Jack J.; Purdue, Sara; Lin, Haisheng; Meredith, J. Carson; Nenes, Athanasios (2019)
    The role of surfactants in governing water interactions of atmospheric aerosols has been a recurring topic in cloud microphysics for more than two decades. Studies of detailed surface thermodynamics are limited by the availability of aerosol samples for experimental analysis and incomplete validation of various proposed Kohler model frameworks for complex mixtures representative of atmospheric aerosol. Pollenkitt is a viscous material that coats grains of pollen and plays important roles in pollen dispersion and plant reproduction. Previous work suggests that it may also be an important contributor to pollen water uptake and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity. The chemical composition of pollenkitt varies between species but has been found to comprise complex organic mixtures including oxygenated, lipid, and aliphatic functionalities. This mix of functionalities suggests that pollenkitt may display aqueous surface activity, which could significantly impact pollen interactions with atmospheric water. Here, we study the surface activity of pollenkitt from six different species and its influence on pollenkitt hygroscopicity. We measure cloud droplet activation and concentration-dependent surface tension of pollenkitt and its mixtures with ammonium sulfate salt. Experiments are compared to predictions from several thermodynamic models, taking aqueous surface tension reduction and surfactant surface partitioning into account in various ways. We find a clear reduction of surface tension by pollenkitt in aqueous solution and evidence for impact of both surface tension and surface partitioning mechanisms on cloud droplet activation potential and hygroscopicity of pollenkitt particles. In addition, we find indications of complex nonideal solution effects in a systematic and consistent dependency of pollenkitt hygroscopicity on particle size. The impact of pollenkitt surface activity on cloud microphysics is different from what is observed in previous work for simple atmospheric surfactants and more resembles recent observations for complex primary and secondary organic aerosol, adding new insight to our understanding of the multifaceted role of surfactants in governing aerosol-water interactions. We illustrate how the explicit characterization of pollenkitt contributions provides the basis for modeling water uptake and cloud formation of pollen and their fragments over a wide range of atmospheric conditions.
  • Danquah, Jones Abrefa; Appiah, Mark; Ari, Pappinen (2011)
  • Galbrun, Esther; Tang, Hui; Fortelius, Mikael; Zliobaite, Indre (2018)
    As organisms are adapted to their environments, assemblages of taxa can be used to describe environments in the present and in the past. Here, we use a data mining method, namely redescription mining, to discover and analyze patterns of association between large herbivorous mammals and their environments via their functional traits. We focus on functional properties of animal teeth, characterized using a recently developed dental trait scoring scheme. The teeth of herbivorous mammals serve as an interface to obtain energy from food, and are therefore expected to match the types of plant food available in their environment. Hence, dental traits are expected to carry a signal of environmental conditions. We analyze a global compilation of occurrences of large herbivorous mammals and of bioclimatic conditions. We identify common patterns of association between dental traits distributions and bioclimatic conditions and discuss their implications. Each pattern can be considered as a computational biome. Our analysis distinguishes three global zones, which we refer to as the boreal-temperate moist zone, the tropical moist zone and the tropical-subtropical dry zone. The boreal-temperate moist zone is mainly characterized by seasonal cold temperatures, a lack of hypsodonty and a high share of species with obtuse lophs. The tropical moist zone is mainly characterized by high temperatures, high isothermality, abundant precipitation and a high share of species with acute rather than obtuse lophs. Finally, the tropical dry zone is mainly characterized by a high seasonality of temperatures and precipitation, as well as high hypsodonty and horizodonty. We find that the dental traits signature of African rain forests is quite different from the signature of climatically similar sites in North America and Asia, where hypsodont species and species with obtuse lophs are mostly absent. In terms of climate and dental signatures, the African seasonal tropics share many similarities with Central-South Asian sites. Interestingly, the Tibetan plateau is covered both by redescriptions from the tropical-subtropical dry group and by redescriptions from the boreal-temperate moist group, suggesting a combination of features from both zones in its dental traits and climate.
  • Reyes-Garcia, Victoria; Powell, Bronwen; Diaz-Reviriego, Isabel; Fernandez-Llamazares, Alvaro; Gallois, Sandrine; Gueze, Maximilien (2019)
    The diets of contemporary hunter-gatherers are diverse and highly nutritious, but are rapidly changing as these societies integrate into the market economy. Here, we analyse empirical data on the dietary patterns and sources of foods of three contemporary hunter-gatherer societies: the Baka of Cameroon (n=160), the Tsimane' of Bolivia (n=124) and the Punan Tubu of Indonesia (n=109). We focus on differences among villages with different levels of integration into the market economy and explore potential pathways through which two key elements of the food environment (food availability and food accessibility) might alter the diets of contemporary hunter-gatherers. Results suggest that people living in isolated villages have more diverse diets than those living in villages closer to markets. Our results also suggest that availability of nutritionally important foods (i.e., fruits, vegetables and animal foods) decreases with increasing market integration, while availability of fats and sweets increases. The differences found seem to relate to changes in the wider food environment (e.g., village level access to wild and/or market foods and seasonality), rather than to individual-level factors (e.g., time allocation or individual income), probably because food sharing reduces the impact of individual level differences in food consumption. These results highlight the need to better understand the impact of changes in the wider food environment on dietary choice, and the role of the food environment in driving dietary transitions.
  • Ribas, Camila C.; Aleixo, Alexandre (2019)
    Amazonia has been a focus of interest since the early days of biogeography as an intrinsically complex and extremely diverse region. This region comprises an intricate mosaic that includes diverse types of forest formations, flooded environments and open vegetation. Increased knowledge about the distribution of species in Amazonia has led to the recognition of complex biogeographic patterns. The confrontation of these biogeographic patterns with information on the geological and climatic history of the region has generated several hypotheses dedicated to explain the origin of the biological diversity. Genomic information, coupled with knowledge of Earth's history, especially the evolution of the Amazonian landscape. presents fascinating possibilities for understanding the mechanisms that govern the origin and maintenance of diversity patterns in one of the most diverse regions of the world. For this we will increasingly need more intense and coordinated interactions between researchers studying biotic diversification and the evolution of landscapes. From the interaction between these two fields of knowledge that are in full development, an increasingly detailed understanding of the historical mechanisms related to the origin of the species will surely arise.
  • Gray, Claudia L.; Slade, Eleanor M.; Mann, Darren J.; Lewis, Owen T. (2014)
  • Rocha, Ricardo; Ferreira, Diogo F.; Lopez-Baucells, Adria; Farneda, Fabio Z.; Carreiras, Joao M. B.; Palmeirim, Jorge M.; Meyer, Christoph F. J. (2017)
    Understanding the consequences of habitat modification on wildlife communities is central to the development of conservation strategies. However, albeit male and female individuals of numerous species are known to exhibit differences in habitat use, sex-specific responses to habitat modification remain little explored. Here, we used a landscape-scale fragmentation experiment to assess, separately for males and females, the effects of fragmentation on the abundance of Carollia perspicillata and Rhinophylla pumilio, two widespread Neotropical frugivorous bats. We predicted that sex-specific responses would arise from higher energetic requirements from pregnancy and lactation in females. Analyses were conducted independently for each season, and we further investigated the joint responses to local and landscape-scale metrics of habitat quality, composition, and configuration. Although males and females responded similarly to a fragmentation gradient composed by continuous forest, fragment interiors, edges, and matrix habitats, we found marked differences between sexes in habitat use for at least one of the seasons. Whereas the sex ratio varied little in continuous forest and fragment interiors, females were found to be more abundant than males in edge and matrix habitats. This difference was more prominent in the dry season, the reproductive season of both species. For both species, abundance responses to local-and landscape-scale predictors differed between sexes and again, differences were more pronounced in the dry season. The results suggest considerable sex-mediated responses to forest disruption and degradation in tropical bats and complement our understanding of the impacts of fragmentation on tropical forest vertebrate communities. Abstract in Portuguese is available with online material.
  • Aserse, Aregu Amsalu; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Whitman, William B.; Lindstrom, Kristina (2017)
    The type strain of the prospective Bradyrhizobium shewense sp. nov. ERR11(T), was isolated from a nodule of the leguminous tree Erythrina brucei native to Ethiopia. The type strain Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense CCBAU 10071(T), was isolated from the nodules of Lespedeza cuneata in Beijing, China. The genomes of ERR11(T) and CCBAU 10071(T) were sequenced by DOE-JGI and deposited at the DOE-JGI genome portal as well as at the European Nucleotide Archive. The genome of ERR11(T) is 9,163,226 bp in length and has 102 scaffolds, containing 8548 protein-coding and 86 RNA genes. The CCBAU 10071(T) genome is arranged in 108 scaffolds and consists of 8,201,522 bp long and 7776 protein-coding and 85 RNA genes. Both genomes contain symbiotic genes, which are homologous to the genes found in the complete genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens USDA110(T). The genes encoding for nodulation and nitrogen fixation in ERR11(T) showed high sequence similarity with homologous genes found in the draft genome of peanut-nodulating Bradyrhizobium arachidis LMG 26795(T). The nodulation genes nolYAnodD2D1YABCSUIJ-nolO-nodZ of ERR11(T) and CCBAU 10071(T) are organized in a similar way to the homologous genes identified in the genomes of USDA110(T), Bradyrhizobium ottawaense USDA 4 and Bradyrhizobium liaoningense CCBAU 05525. The genomes harbor hupSLCFHK and hypBFDE genes that code the expression of hydrogenase, an enzyme that helps rhizobia to uptake hydrogen released by the N2-fixation process and genes encoding denitrification functions napEDABC and norCBQD for nitrate and nitric oxide reduction, respectively. The genome of ERR11(T) also contains nosRZDFYLX genes encoding nitrous oxide reductase. Based on multilocus sequence analysis of housekeeping genes, the novel species, which contains eight strains formed a unique group close to the B. ottawaense branch. Genome Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI) calculated between the genome sequences of ERR11(T) and closely related sequences revealed that strains belonging to B. ottawaense branch (USDA4 and CCBAU15615), were the closest strains to the strain ERR11(T) with 95.2% ANI. Type strain ERR11(T) showed the highest DDH predicted value with CCBAU15615 (58.5%), followed by USDA 4 (53.1%). Nevertheless, the ANI and DDH values obtained between ERR11(T) and CCBAU 15615 or USDA 4 were below the cutoff values (ANI = 96.5%; DDH = 70%) for strains belonging to the same species, suggesting that ERR11(T) is a new species. Therefore, based on the phylogenetic analysis, ANI and DDH values, we formally propose the creation of B. shewense sp. nov. with strain ERR11(T) (HAMBI 3532(T)= LMG 30162(T)) as the type strain.
  • Aben, J.; Adriaensen, F.; Thijs, K. W.; Pellikka, P.; Siljander, M.; Lens, L.; Matthysen, E. (2012)
  • Jucker, Tommaso; Asner, Gregory P.; Dalponte, Michele; Brodrick, Philip G.; Philipson, Christopher D.; Vaughn, Nicholas R.; Teh, Yit Arn; Brelsford, Craig; Burslem, David F. R. P.; Deere, Nicolas J.; Ewers, Robert M.; Kvasnica, Jakub; Lewis, Simon L.; Malhi, Yadvinder; Milne, Sol; Nilus, Reuben; Pfeifer, Marion; Phillips, Oliver L.; Qie, Lan; Renneboog, Nathan; Reynolds, Glen; Riutta, Terhi; Struebig, Matthew J.; Svatek, Martin; Turner, Edgar C.; Coomes, David A. (2018)
    Borneo contains some of the world's most biodiverse and carbon-dense tropical forest, but this 750 000 km(2) island has lost 62% of its old-growth forests within the last 40 years. Efforts to protect and restore the remaining forests of Borneo hinge on recognizing the ecosystem services they provide, including their ability to store and sequester carbon. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a remote sensing technology that allows forest structural properties to be captured in great detail across vast geographic areas. In recent years ALS has been integrated into statewide assessments of forest carbon in Neotropical and African regions, but not yet in Asia. For this to happen new regional models need to be developed for estimating carbon stocks from ALS in tropical Asia, as the forests of this region are structurally and composition-ally distinct from those found elsewhere in the tropics. By combining ALS imagery with data from 173 permanent forest plots spanning the lowland rainforests of Sabah on the island of Borneo, we develop a simple yet general model for estimating forest carbon stocks using ALS-derived canopy height and canopy cover as input metrics. An advanced feature of this new model is the propagation of uncertainty in both ALS- and ground-based data, allowing uncertainty in hectare-scale estimates of carbon stocks to be quantified robustly. We show that the model effectively captures variation in aboveground carbon stocks across extreme disturbance gradients spanning tall dipterocarp forests and heavily logged regions and clearly outperforms existing ALS-based models calibrated for the tropics, as well as currently available satellite-derived products. Our model provides a simple, generalized and effective approach for mapping forest carbon stocks in Borneo and underpins ongoing efforts to safeguard and facilitate the restoration of its unique tropical forests.
  • Moura, Carina Carneiro de Melo; Fernandes, Alexandre M.; Aleixo, Alexandre; Pereira de Araujo, Helder Farias; Mariano, Erich de Freitas; Wink, Michael (2020)
    We focus on reconstructing a spatiotemporal scenario of diversification of a widespread South American species, the Pectoral Sparrow Arremon taciturnus (Aves: Passerellidae). This species is widely distributed in both the humid and the dry forests of South America and therefore provides an interesting model for understanding the connection between different biomes of South America. We examined nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial genes Cytochrome b (cyt-b) and NADH subunit 2 (ND2) from 107 specimens, and one nuclear marker (intron 7 of the beta-fibrinogen gene) from a subset of samples collected across the distribution ranges of A. t. taciturnus and A. t. nigrirostris. Six major lineages were recovered in the phylogenies that displayed high levels of variance of allele frequencies and corresponded to distinct geographical locations. The estimation of divergence times provided evidence that diversification of the six lineages of the Pectoral Sparrow occurred throughout the Late Pleistocene across major cis-Andean biomes and Amazonian interfluves. Our dataset for A. taciturnus provides further evidence that rivers in Amazonia constitute barriers promoting allopatric speciation, with occasional sharing of alleles among lineages, particularly those with adjacent distributions.
  • Launis, Annina; Pykälä, Juha; van den Boom, Pieter; Serusiaux, Emmanuel; Myllys, Leena (2019)
    In this study we clarify the phylogeny and reassess the current taxonomy of the Micarea prasina group, focusing especially on the M. byssacea and M. micrococca complexes. The phylogeny was investigated using ITS, mtSSU and Mcm7 regions from 25 taxa belonging to the M. prasina group. A total of 107 new sequences were generated. Data were analyzed using maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods. The results reveal five undescribed well-supported lineages. Four of the lineages represent new species described as Micarea pseudomicrococca Launis & Myllys sp. nov., M. czarnotae Launis, van den Boom, Serusiaux & Myllys sp. nov., M. microareolata Launis, Pykala & Myllys sp. nov. and M. laeta Launis & Myllys sp. nov. In addition, a fifth lineage was revealed that requires further study. Micarea pseudomicrococca is characterized by an olive green granular thallus, small cream-white or brownish apothecia lacking the Sedifolia-grey pigment and two types of paraphyses up to 2 mu m wide. Micarea czarnotae forms a granular, densely granular or continuous olive green thallus, convex to hemispherical apothecia often with the Sedifolia-grey pigment and no crystalline granules in the thallus. Micarea microareolata is characterized by a +/- pale green areolate thallus (composed of goniocysts), cream-white apothecia lacking the Sedifolia-grey pigment and narrow spores. Micarea laeta has a vivid to olive green granular thallus, pale apothecia lacking the Sedifolia-grey pigment and wider spores compared to M. microareolata. Descriptions, images and a key are provided for the new species. Crystalline granules are introduced as a novel species-level character for Micarea.
  • Rödenbeck, Christian; Zaehle, Sönke; Keeling, Ralph; Heimann, Martin (2018)
    The response of the terrestrial net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 to climate variations and trends may crucially determine the future climate trajectory. Here we directly quantify this response on inter-annual timescales by building a linear regression of inter-annual NEE anomalies against observed air temperature anomalies into an atmospheric inverse calculation based on long-term atmospheric CO2 observations. This allows us to estimate the sensitivity of NEE to inter-annual variations in temperature (seen as a climate proxy) resolved in space and with season. As this sensitivity comprises both direct temperature effects and the effects of other climate variables co-varying with temperature, we interpret it as "inter-annual climate sensitivity". We find distinct seasonal patterns of this sensitivity in the northern extratropics that are consistent with the expected seasonal responses of photosynthesis, respiration, and fire. Within uncertainties, these sensitivity patterns are consistent with independent inferences from eddy covariance data. On large spatial scales, northern extratropical and tropical interannual NEE variations inferred from the NEE-T regression are very similar to the estimates of an atmospheric inversion with explicit inter-annual degrees of freedom. The results of this study offer a way to benchmark ecosystem process models in more detail than existing effective global climate sensitivities. The results can also be used to gap-fill or extrapolate observational records or to separate inter-annual variations from longer-term trends.
  • Deng, Yange; Kagami, Sara; Ogawa, Shuhei; Kawana, Kaori; Nakayama, Tomoki; Kubodera, Ryo; Adachi, Kouji; Hussein, Tareq; Miyazaki, Yuzo; Mochida, Michihiro (2018)
    The formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosols (BSOAs) in forest environments is potentially important to cloud formation via changes of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aerosols. In this study, the CCN activation of submicrometer aerosols and their chemical compositions and size distributions were measured at a midlatitude forest site in Japan during the summer of 2014 to assess the hygroscopicity of the organic aerosols and their contributions to the local CCN concentrations. The mean number concentrations of the condensation nuclei and CCN at supersaturation (SS) conditions of 0.11-0.80% were 1,238 and 166-740cm(-3), respectively. Organic aerosols and sulfate dominated the submicrometer aerosol mass concentrations. The particle hygroscopicity increased with increases in particle diameters. The hygroscopicity parameter for the organics, (org), was positively correlated with the atomic O to C ratio. The product of (org) and the volume fraction of OA was 0.12, accounting for 38% of the water uptake by aerosol particles. The hygroscopicity parameter of the locally formed fresh BSOA was estimated to be 0.09. The contribution of OA to the CCN number concentration, which was assessed by subtracting the CCN concentration of the hypothetical inorganic aerosols from that of the ambient aerosols, was 50-182cm(-3) for the SS range of 0.11-0.80%. The increase of the CCN number concentrations per 1-g/m(3) increase of the BSOA was 23-299cm(-3) at 0.11-0.80% SS. The contribution of the BSOA to the CCN number concentration can be enhanced by new particle formation. Plain Language Summary Some of the particles suspended in the atmosphere can absorb water vapors around them and act as nuclei to form cloud droplets. These particles are called cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), the quantification of which is important for climate forcing prediction. The ability of a particle to absorb water is referred to as hygroscopicity, which is governed by the chemical composition. Volatile organic vapors emitted by vegetation (i.e., biogenic volatile organic compound) after chemical reactions in the atmosphere can either condense onto existing particles or participate in the formation of new particles and thus change the aerosol chemical composition. The aerosol component originated from biogenic volatile organic compounds, named biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA), is an important constituent of CCN on a global scale. However, the hygroscopicity of BSOA and its contribution to CCN are not understood well. We performed measurements of the hygroscopicity and chemical composition of aerosol particles in a forest in Japan. Based on the observation, we calculated the hygroscopicity of the BSOA formed in the forest and quantified the contribution of the BSOA to the CCN number concentrations. An enhancement of the contribution of BSOA to the CCN number concentrations by new particle formation is suggested, which is an important subject of future studies.
  • Praplan, Arnaud P.; Tykka, Toni; Chen, Dean; Boy, Michael; Taipale, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Zhou, Putian; Petaja, Tuukka; Hellen, Heidi (2019)
    Total hydroxyl radical (OH) reactivity measurements were conducted at the second Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations (SMEAR II), a boreal forest site located in Hyytiala, Finland, from April to July 2016. The measured values were compared with OH reactivity calculated from a combination of data from the routine trace gas measurements (station mast) as well as online and offline analysis with a gas chromatographer coupled to a mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and offline liquid chromatography. Up to 104 compounds, mostly volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxidized VOCs, but also inorganic compounds, were included in the analysis, even though the data availability for each compound varied with time. The monthly averaged experimental total OH reactivity was found to be higher in April and May (ca. 20 s(-1)) than in June and July (7.6 and 15.4 s(-1), respectively). The measured values varied much more in spring with high reactivity peaks in late afternoon, with values higher than in the summer, in particular when the soil was thawing. Total OH reactivity values generally followed the pattern of mixing ratios due to change of the boundary layer height. The missing reactivity fraction (defined as the difference between measured and calculated OH reactivity) was found to be high. Several reasons that can explain the missing reactivity are discussed in detail such as (1) missing measurements due to technical issues, (2) not measuring oxidation compounds of detected biogenic VOCs, and (3) missing important reactive compounds or classes of compounds with the available measurements. In order to test the second hypothesis, a one-dimensional chemical transport model (SOSAA) has been used to estimate the amount of unmeasured oxidation products and their expected contribution to the reactivity for three different short periods in April, May, and July. However, only a small fraction (<4.5 %) of the missing reactivity can be explained by modelled secondary compounds (mostly oxidized VOCs). These findings indicate that compounds measured but not included in the model as well as unmeasured primary emissions contribute the missing reactivity. In the future, non-hydrocarbon compounds from sources other than vegetation (e.g. soil) should be included in OH reactivity studies.
  • Santana, Antonita; Silva, Sofia Marques; Batista, Romina; Sampaio, Iracilda; Aleixo, Alexandre (2021)
    The true diversity and interspecific limits in the Neotropical endemic avian genusDendrocolaptes(Furnariidae) remain a highly controversial subject, with previous genus-wide assessments, based mostly on morphological characters, producing poorly resolved phylogenies. The lack of well-resolved, robust, and taxonomically densely sampled phylogenies forDendrocolaptesprevents reliable inferences on the genus' actual species diversity and evolutionary history. Here, we analyzed 2,741 base pairs of mitochondrial and nuclear genes from 43 specimens belonging to all species and the majority of subspecies described forDendrocolaptesto evaluate species limits and reconstruct its diversification through time. Our phylogenies recovered a monophyleticDendrocolaptes, with two main highly supported internal clades corresponding to theD. certhiaandD. picumnusspecies complexes. Also, our analyses supported the monophyly of mostDendrocolaptesspecies recognized today, exceptD. picumnus, which was consistently recovered as paraphyletic with respect toD. hoffmannsi. A coalescent-based test supported a total of 15 different lineages inDendrocolaptesand indicated that the number of currently accepted species within the genus may be greatly underestimated. Particularly relevant, when combined with previous analyses based on plumage characters, comparative high levels of genetic differentiation and coalescent analyses support the recognition ofD. picumnus transfasciatusas a full species that is already under threat. Ancestral area reconstructions suggest that diversification inDendrocolapteswas centered in lowland Amazonia, with several independent dispersal events leading to differentiation into different adjacent dry and high elevation forest types throughout the Neotropics, mainly during the Middle and Late Pleistocene.