Browsing by Subject "RECURRENT"

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  • Ruotsalainen, Sanni E.; Partanen, Juulia J.; Cichonska, Anna; Lin, Jake; Benner, Christian; Surakka, Ida; Reeve, Mary Pat; Palta, Priit; Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Ahola-Olli, Ari; Palotie, Aarno; Salomaa, Veikko; Daly, Mark J.; Pirinen, Matti; Ripatti, Samuli; Koskela, Jukka (2021)
    Multivariate methods are known to increase the statistical power to detect associations in the case of shared genetic basis between phenotypes. They have, however, lacked essential analytic tools to follow-up and understand the biology underlying these associations. We developed a novel computational workflow for multivariate GWAS follow-up analyses, including fine-mapping and identification of the subset of traits driving associations (driver traits). Many follow-up tools require univariate regression coefficients which are lacking from multivariate results. Our method overcomes this problem by using Canonical Correlation Analysis to turn each multivariate association into its optimal univariate Linear Combination Phenotype (LCP). This enables an LCP-GWAS, which in turn generates the statistics required for follow-up analyses. We implemented our method on 12 highly correlated inflammatory biomarkers in a Finnish population-based study. Altogether, we identified 11 associations, four of which (F5, ABO, C1orf140 and PDGFRB) were not detected by biomarker-specific analyses. Fine-mapping identified 19 signals within the 11 loci and driver trait analysis determined the traits contributing to the associations. A phenome-wide association study on the 19 representative variants from the signals in 176,899 individuals from the FinnGen study revealed 53 disease associations (p <1 x 10(-4)). Several reported pQTLs in the 11 loci provided orthogonal evidence for the biologically relevant functions of the representative variants. Our novel multivariate analysis workflow provides a powerful addition to standard univariate GWAS analyses by enabling multivariate GWAS follow-up and thus promoting the advancement of powerful multivariate methods in genomics.
  • Aaltonen, Kari I.; Rosenström, Tom; Jylhä, Pekka; Holma, Irina; Holma, Mikael; Pallaskorpi, Sanna; Riihimäki, Kirsi; Suominen, Kirsi; Vuorilehto, Maria; Isometsä, Erkki T. (2020)
    Background: Preceding suicide attempts strongly predict future suicidal acts. However, whether attempting suicide per se increases the risk remains undetermined. We longitudinally investigated among patients with mood disorders whether after a suicide attempt future attempts occur during milder depressive states, indicating a possible lowered threshold for acting. Methods: We used 5-year follow-up data from 581 patients of the Jorvi Bipolar Study, Vantaa Depression Study, and Vantaa Primary Care Depression Study cohorts. Lifetime suicide attempts were investigated at baseline and during the follow-up. At follow-up interviews, life-chart data on the course of the mood disorder were generated and suicide attempts timed. By using individual-level data and multilevel modeling, we investigated at each incident attempt the association between the lifetime ordinal number of the attempt and the major depressive episode (MDE) status (full MDE, partial remission, or remission). Results: A total of 197 suicide attempts occurred among 90 patients, most during MDEs. When the dependencies between observations and individual liabilities were modeled, no association was found between the number of past suicide attempts at the time of each attempt and partial remissions. No association between adjusted inter-suicide attempt times and the number of past attempts emerged during follow-up. No indication for direct risk-increasing effects was found. Conclusion: Among mood disorder patients, repeated suicide attempts do not tend to occur during milder depressive states than in the preceding attempts. Previous suicide attempts may indicate underlying diathesis, future risk being principally set by the course of the disorder itself.
  • Cammarota, Giovanni; Ianiro, Gianluca; Tilg, Herbert; Rajilic-Stojanovic, Mirjana; Kump, Patrizia; Satokari, Reetta; Sokol, Harry; Arkkila, Perttu; Pintus, Cristina; Hart, Ailsa; Segal, Jonathan; Aloi, Marina; Masucci, Luca; Molinaro, Antonio; Scaldaferri, Franco; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Lopez-Sanroman, Antonio; Link, Alexander; De Groot, Pieter; de Vos, Willem M.; Hoegenauer, Christoph; Malfertheiner, Peter; Mattila, Eero; Milosavljevic, Tomica; Nieuwdorp, Max; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Simren, Magnus; Gasbarrini, Antonio; European FMT Working Grp (2017)
    Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an important therapeutic option for Clostridium difficile infection. Promising findings suggest that FMT may play a role also in the management of other disorders associated with the alteration of gut microbiota. Although the health community is assessing FMT with renewed interest and patients are becoming more aware, there are technical and logistical issues in establishing such a non-standardised treatment into the clinical practice with safety and proper governance. In view of this, an evidence-based recommendation is needed to drive the practical implementation of FMT. In this European Consensus Conference, 28 experts from 10 countries collaborated, in separate working groups and through an evidence-based process, to provide statements on the following key issues: FMT indications; donor selection; preparation of faecal material; clinical management and faecal delivery and basic requirements for implementing an FMT centre. Statements developed by each working group were evaluated and voted by all members, first through an electronic Delphi process, and then in a plenary consensus conference. The recommendations were released according to best available evidence, in order to act as guidance for physicians who plan to implement FMT, aiming at supporting the broad availability of the procedure, discussing other issues relevant to FMT and promoting future clinical research in the area of gut microbiota manipulation. This consensus report strongly recommends the implementation of FMT centres for the treatment of C. difficile infection as well as traces the guidelines of technicality, regulatory, administrative and laboratory requirements.
  • Lahtinen, Perttu; Mattila, Eero; Anttila, Veli-Jukka; Tillonen, Jyrki; Teittinen, Matti; Nevalainen, Pasi; Salminen, Seppo; Satokari, Reetta; Arkkila, Perttu (2017)
    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is effective in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI). Knowledge of the safety and efficacy of FMT treatment in immune deficient patients is scarce. FMT has been suggested as a potential method for an increasing number of new indications besides rCDI. Among our FMT-treated rCDI patients, we reviewed those with major comorbidities: two human immunodeficiency virus patients, six haemodialysis patients, two kidney transplant patients, two liver transplant patients and a patient with chronic lymphatic leukaemia. We also reviewed those treated with FMT for indications other than rCDI: Salmonella carriage (two patients), trimethylaminuria (two patients), small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO; one patient), and lymphocytic colitis (one patient), as well as a common variable immunodeficiency patient with chronic norovirus infection and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) carriage. Of the thirteen rCDI patients treated with FMT, eleven cleared the CDI. The observed adverse events were not directly attributable to FMT. Concerning the special indications, both Salmonellas and ESBL-producing E. coli were eradicated. One trimethylaminuria patient and one SIBO-patient reported a reduction of symptoms. Three patients did not experience a benefit from FMT: chronic norovirus, lymphocytic colitis and the other fish malodour syndrome. There were no reported side effects in this group. FMT appeared to be safe and effective for immunocompromised patients with rCDI. FMT showed promise for the eradication of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but further research is warranted.
  • Tuomainen, Katja; Al-Samadi, Ahmed; Potdar, Swapnil; Turunen, Laura; Turunen, Minna; Karhemo, Piia-Riitta; Bergman, Paula; Risteli, Maija; Åström, Pirjo; Tiikkaja, Riia; Grenman, Reidar; Wennerberg, Krister; Monni, Outi; Salo, Tuula (2020)
    In vitro cancer drug testing carries a low predictive value. We developed the human leiomyoma-derived matrix "Myogel" to better mimic the human tumor microenvironment (TME). We hypothesized that Myogel could provide an appropriate microenvironment for cancer cells, thereby allowing more in vivo-relevant drug testing. We screened 19 anticancer compounds, targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), MEK, and PI3K/mTOR on 12 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines cultured on plastic, mouse sarcoma-derived Matrigel (MSDM), and Myogel. We applied a high-throughput drug screening assay under five different culturing conditions: cells in two-dimensional (2D) plastic wells and on top or embedded in Matrigel or Myogel. We then compared the efficacy of the anticancer compounds to the response rates of 19 HNSCC monotherapy clinical trials. Cancer cells on top of Myogel responded less to EGFR and MEK inhibitors compared to cells cultured on plastic or Matrigel. However, we found a similar response to the PI3K/mTOR inhibitors under all culturing conditions. Cells grown on Myogel more closely resembled the response rates reported in EGFR-inhibitor monotherapy clinical trials. Our findings suggest that a human tumor matrix improves the predictability of in vitro anticancer drug testing compared to current 2D and MSDM methods.
  • Al-Samadi, Ahmed; Poor, Benedek; Tuomainen, Katja; Liu, Ville; Hyytiäinen, Aini; Suleymanova, Ilida; Mesimäki, Karri; Wilkman, Tommy; Mäkitie, Antti; Saavalainen, Paivi; Salo, Tuula (2019)
    Objectives: Immunotherapy and personalized medicine therapeutics are emerging as promising approaches in the management of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In spite of that, there is yet no assay that could predict individual response to immunotherapy. Methods: We manufactured an in vitro 3D microfluidic chip to test the efficacy of immunotherapy. The assay was first tested using a tongue cancer cell line (HSC-3) embedded in a human tumour-derived matrix "Myogel/fibrin" and immune cells from three healthy donors. Next, the chips were used with freshly isolated cancer cells, patients' serum and immune cells. Chips were loaded with different immune checkpoint inhibitors, PD-L1 antibody and IDO 1 inhibitor. Migration of immune cells towards cancer cells and the cancer cell proliferation rate were evaluated. Results: Immune cell migration towards HSC-3 cells was cancer cell density dependent. IDO 1 inhibitor induced immune cells to migrate towards cancer cells both in HSC-3 and in two HNSCC patient samples. Efficacy of PD-L1 antibody and IDO 1 inhibitor was patient dependent. Conclusion: We introduced the first humanized in vitro microfluidic chip assay to test immunotherapeutic drugs against HNSCC patient samples. This assay could be used to predict the efficacy of immunotherapeutic drugs for individual patients.
  • Cammarota, Giovanni; Ianiro, Gianluca; Kelly, Colleen R.; Mullish, Benjamin H.; Allegretti, Jessica R.; Kassam, Zain; Putignani, Lorenza; Fischer, Monika; Keller, Josbert J.; Costello, Samuel Paul; Sokol, Harry; Kump, Patrizia; Satokari, Reetta; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kao, Dina; Arkkila, Perttu; Kuijper, Ed J.; Vehreschild, Maria J. G. T.; Pintus, Cristina; Lopetuso, Loris; Masucci, Luca; Scaldaferri, Franco; Terveer, E. M.; Nieuwdorp, Max; Lopez-Sanroman, Antonio; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Hart, Ailsa; Tilg, Herbert; Gasbarrini, Antonio (2019)
    Although faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has a well-established role in the treatment of recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI), its widespread dissemination is limited by several obstacles, including lack of dedicated centres, difficulties with donor recruitment and complexities related to regulation and safety monitoring. Given the considerable burden of CDI on global healthcare systems, FMT should be widely available to most centres. Stool banks may guarantee reliable, timely and equitable access to FMT for patients and a traceable workflow that ensures safety and quality of procedures. In this consensus project, FMT experts from Europe, North America and Australia gathered and released statements on the following issues related to the stool banking: general principles, objectives and organisation of the stool bank; selection and screening of donors; collection, preparation and storage of faeces; services and clients; registries, monitoring of outcomes and ethical issues; and the evolving role of FMT in clinical practice, Consensus on each statement was achieved through a Delphi process and then in a plenary face-to-face meeting. For each key issue, the best available evidence was assessed, with the aim of providing guidance for the development of stool banks in order to promote accessibility to FMT in clinical practice.
  • Skaga, Erlend; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Fayzullin, Artem; Sandberg, Cecilie J.; Potdar, Swapnil; Kyttälä, Aija; Langmoen, Iver A.; Laakso, Aki; Gaal-Paavola, Emilia; Perola, Markus; Wennerberg, Krister; Vik-Mo, Einar O. (2019)
    BackgroundA major barrier to effective treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) is the large intertumoral heterogeneity at the genetic and cellular level. In early phase clinical trials, patient heterogeneity in response to therapy is commonly observed; however, how tumor heterogeneity is reflected in individual drug sensitivities in the treatment-naive glioblastoma stem cells (GSC) is unclear.MethodsWe cultured 12 patient-derived primary GBMs as tumorspheres and validated tumor stem cell properties by functional assays. Using automated high-throughput screening (HTS), we evaluated sensitivity to 461 anticancer drugs in a collection covering most FDA-approved anticancer drugs and investigational compounds with a broad range of molecular targets. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way ANOVA and Spearman correlation.ResultsAlthough tumor stem cell properties were confirmed in GSC cultures, their in vitro and in vivo morphology and behavior displayed considerable tumor-to-tumor variability. Drug screening revealed significant differences in the sensitivity to anticancer drugs (p
  • Freitag, Tobias L.; Hartikainen, Anna; Jouhten, Hanne; Sahl, Cecilia; Meri, Seppo; Anttila, Veli-Jukka; Mattila, Eero; Arkkila, Perttu; Jalanka, Jonna; Satokari, Reetta (2019)
    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective therapy for recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection (rCDI) and is also considered a potential treatment for a wide range of intestinal and systemic diseases. FMT corrects the microbial dysbiosis associated with rCDI, and the engraftment of donor microbiota is likely to play a key role in treatment efficacy. For disease indications other than rCDI, FMT treatment efficacy has been moderate. This may be partly due to stronger resilience of resident host microbiota in patients who do not suffer from rCDI. In rCDI, patients typically have undergone several antibiotic treatments prior to FMT, depleting the microbiota. In this study, we addressed the effect of broad-spectrum antibiotics (Ab) as a pre-treatment to FMT on the engraftment of donor microbiota in recipients. We conducted a pre-clinical study of FMT between two healthy mouse strains, Balb/c as donors and C57BL/6 as recipients, to perform FMT within the same species and to mimic interindividual FMT between human donors and patients. Microbiota composition was assessed with high-throughput 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing. The microbiota of Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice differed significantly, which allowed for the assessment of microbiota transplantation from the donor strain to the recipient. Our results showed that Ab-treatment depleted microbiota in C57BL/6 recipient mice prior to FMT. The diversity of microbiota did not recover spontaneously to baseline levels during 8 weeks after Ab-treatment, but was restored already at 2 weeks in mice receiving FMT. Interestingly, pre-treatment with antibiotics prior to FMT did not increase the overall similarity of the recipient's microbiota to that of the donor's, as compared with mice receiving FMT without Ab-treatment. Pre-treatment with Ab improved the establishment of only a few donor-derived taxa, such as Bifidobacterium, in the recipients, thus having a minor effect on the engraftment of donor microbiota in FMT. In conclusion, pre-treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics did not improve the overall engraftment of donor microbiota, but did improve the engraftment of specific taxa. These results may inform future therapeutic studies of FMT.
  • Lahtinen, Perttu; Jalanka, Jonna; Hartikainen, Anna; Mattila, Eero; Hillilä, Markku; Punkkinen, Jari; Koskenpato, Jari; Anttila, Veli-Jukka; Tillonen, Jyrki; Satokari, Reetta; Arkkila, Perttu (2020)
    Summary Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been associated with microbial dysbiosis. Aim To investigate the efficacy of faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in the treatment of IBS. Methods Forty-nine IBS patients were randomised to receive autologous or allogenic FMT via colonoscopy. The primary endpoint was a sustained, minimum of 50-point, reduction in the IBS Symptom Severity Score. The secondary outcomes were levels of anxiety and depression, changes in quality of life, gut microbiota and faecal water content as assessed with validated questionnaires, intestinal microbiota composition and stool dry weight. Results The primary endpoint was not achieved in either group. However, there was a transient reduction in the mean IBS Symptom Severity Score in the FMT group at 12 weeks after treatment as compared to baseline (P = 0.01). The groups did not differ in the number of patients achieving clinical response at 12 weeks. In the FMT-treated patients, microbial composition had changed to resemble that of the donor and the stool water content decreased significantly compared to baseline. The depression score decreased in patients with a reduction in IBS symptoms after FMT, but not in those placebo-treated patients who experienced a reduction in IBS symptoms. Conclusions FMT provided only a transient relief of symptoms, although it induced a sustained alteration in the microbiota of IBS patients. Therefore, FMT delivered by a single infusion via colonoscopy cannot be recommended as a treatment for IBS in clinical practice. ClinicalTrials.Org, Trial registration number: NCT03561519.
  • Saba, Nabil F.; Vijayvargiya, Pooja; Vermorken, Jan B.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Willems, Stefan M.; Zidar, Nina; de Bree, Remco; Mäkitie, Antti; Wolf, Greg T.; Argiris, Athanassios; Teng, Yong; Ferlito, Alfio (2022)
    Simple Summary Therapies for squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) have been rapidly evolving, initially with the inclusion of immunotherapy, but more recently with the consideration of anti-angiogenic therapies. Recent preclinical and clinical data reveal a strong correlation between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the progression of SCCHN, with nearly 90% of these malignancies expressing VEGF. Our review article not only elaborates on the utility of anti-VEGF therapies on SCCHN but also its interaction with the immune environment. Furthermore, we detailed the current data on immunotherapies targeting SCCHN and how this could be coupled with anti-angiogenics therapies. Despite the lack of approved anti-angiogenic therapies in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), preclinical and more recent clinical evidence support the role of targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in this disease. Targeting VEGF has gained even greater interest following the recent evidence supporting the role of immunotherapy in the management of advanced SCCHN. Preclinical evidence strongly suggests that VEGF plays a role in promoting the growth and progression of SCCHN, and clinical evidence exists as to the value of combining this strategy with immunotherapeutic agents. Close to 90% of SCCHNs express VEGF, which has been correlated with a worse clinical prognosis and an increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. As immunotherapy is currently at the forefront of the management of advanced SCCHN, revisiting the rationale for targeting angiogenesis in this disease has become an even more attractive proposition.
  • Baunwall, Simon Mark Dahl; Terveer, Elisabeth M.; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Erikstrup, Christian; Arkkila, Perttu; Vehreschild, Maria JGT; Ianiro, Gianluca; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Sokol, Harry; Kump, Patrizia K.; Satokari, Reetta; De Looze, Danny; Vermeire, Séverine; Nakov, Radislav; Brezina, Jan; Helms, Morten; Kjeldsen, Jens; Rode, Anne A.; Kousgaard, Sabrina Just; Alric, Laurent; Trang-Poisson, Caroline; Scanzi, Julien; Link, Alexander; Stallmach, Andreas; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Johnsen, Peter Holger; Garborg, Kjetil; Rodríguez, Eugenia Sánchez; Serrander, Lena; Brummer, Robert J.; Galpérine, Katerina Tatiana; Goldenberg, Simon D.; Mullish, Benjamin H.; Williams, Horace RT; Iqbal, Tariq H.; Ponsioen, Cyriel; Kuijper, Ed J.; Cammarota, Giovanni; Keller, Josbert J.; Hvas, Christian Lodberg (2021)
    Background: Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an emerging treatment modality, but its current clinical use and organisation are unknown. We aimed to describe the clinical use, conduct, and potential for FMT in Europe. Methods: We invited all hospital-based FMT centres within the European Council member states to answer a web-based questionnaire covering their clinical activities, organisation, and regulation of FMT in 2019. Responders were identified from trials registered at clinicaltrials.gov and from the United European Gastroenterology (UEG) working group for stool banking and FMT. Findings: In 2019, 31 FMT centres from 17 countries reported a total of 1,874 (median 25, quartile 10–64) FMT procedures; 1,077 (57%) with Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) as indication, 791 (42%) with experimental indications, and 6 (0•3%) unaccounted for. Adjusted to population size, 0•257 per 100,000 population received FMT for CDI and 0•189 per 100,000 population for experimental indications. With estimated 12,400 (6,100–28,500) annual cases of multiple, recurrent CDI and indication for FMT in Europe, the current European FMT activity covers approximately 10% of the patients with indication. The participating centres demonstrated high safety standards and adherence to international consensus guidelines. Formal or informal regulation from health authorities was present at 21 (68%) centres. Interpretation: FMT is a widespread routine treatment for multiple, recurrent CDI and an experimental treatment. Embedded within hospital settings, FMT centres operate with high standards across Europe to provide safe FMT. A significant gap in FMT coverage suggests the need to raise clinical awareness and increase the FMT activity in Europe by at least 10-fold to meet the true, indicated need. Funding: NordForsk under the Nordic Council and Innovation Fund Denmark (j.no. 8056–00006B).
  • Almangush, Alhadi; De Keukeleire, Stijn; Rottey, Sylvie; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Vermassen, Tijl; Leivo, Ilmo; Mäkitie, Antti A. (2022)
    Simple Summary The immune response has been shown to be a promising indicator to predict the clinical behavior of many cancers, including head and neck cancer. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) were widely introduced as an important tool to reveal the status of the immune response. This review discusses the significance of TILs in head and neck cancers. The evaluation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) has received global attention as a promising prognostic cancer biomarker that can aid in clinical decision making. Proof of their significance was first shown in breast cancer, where TILs are now recommended in the classification of breast tumors. Emerging evidence indicates that the significance of TILs extends to other cancer types, including head and neck cancer. In the era of immunotherapy as a treatment choice for head and neck cancer, assessment of TILs and immune checkpoints is of high clinical relevance. The availability of the standardized method from the International Immuno-oncology Biomarker Working Group (IIBWG) is an important cornerstone toward standardized assessment. The aim of the current article is to summarize the accumulated evidence and to establish a clear premise for future research toward the implementation of TILs in the personalized management of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients.