Browsing by Subject "RED MEAT"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-4 of 4
  • Leroy, Frédéric; Abraini, Fabien; Beal, Ty; Domínguez-Salas, Paula; Gregorini, Pablo; Manzano, Pablo; Rowntree, Jason; van Vliet, Stephan (2022)
    Animal source foods are evolutionarily appropriate foods for humans. It is therefore remarkable that they are now presented by some as unhealthy, unsustainable, and unethical, particularly in the urban West. The benefits of consuming them are nonetheless substantial, as they offer a wide spectrum of nutrients that are needed for cell and tissue development, function, and survival. They play a role in proper physical and cognitive development of infants, children, and adolescents, and help promote maintenance of physical function with ageing. While high-red meat consumption in the West is associated with several forms of chronic disease, these associations remain uncertain in other cultural contexts or when consumption is part of wholesome diets. Besides health concerns, there is also widespread anxiety about the environmental impacts of animal source foods. Although several production methods are detrimental (intensive cropping for feed, overgrazing, deforestation, water pollution, etc.) and require substantial mitigation, damaging impacts are not intrinsic to animal husbandry. When well-managed, livestock farming contributes to ecosystem management and soil health, while delivering high-quality foodstuffs through the upcycling of resources that are otherwise non-suitable for food production, making use of marginal land and inedible materials (forage, by-products, etc.), integrating livestock and crop farming where possible has the potential to benefit plant food production through enhanced nutrient recycling, while minimising external input needs such as fertilisers and pesticides. Moreover, the impacts on land use, water wastage, and greenhouse gas emissions are highly contextual, and their estimation is often erroneous due to a reductionist use of metrics. Similarly, whether animal husbandry is ethical or not depends on practical specificities, not on the fact that animals are involved. Such discussions also need to factor in that animal husbandry plays an important role in culture, societal well-being, food security, and the provision of livelihoods. We seize this opportunity to argue for less preconceived assumptions about alleged effects of animal source foods on the health of the planet and the humans and animals involved, for less top-down planning based on isolated metrics or (Western) technocratic perspectives, and for more holistic and circumstantial approaches to the food system.
  • Key, Timothy J.; Appleby, Paul N.; Bradbury, Kathryn E.; Sweeting, Michael; Wood, Angela; Johansson, Ingegerd; Kuehn, Tilman; Steur, Marinka; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Wennberg, Maria; Wuertz, Anne Mette Lund; Agudo, Antonio; Andersson, Jonas; Arriola, Larraitz; Boeing, Heiner; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Bonnet, Fabrice; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Cross, Amanda J.; Ericson, Ulrika; Fagherazzi, Guy; Ferrari, Pietro; Gunter, Marc; Huerta, Jose Maria; Katzke, Verena; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Krogh, Vittorio; La Vecchia, Carlo; Matullo, Giuseppe; Moreno-Iribas, Conchi; Naska, Androniki; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Molina-Portillo, Elena; Quiros, J. Ramon; Skeie, Guri; Sluijs, Ivonne; Sonestedt, Emily; Stepien, Magdalena; Tjonneland, Anne; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Tumino, Rosario; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Langenberg, Claudia; Forouhi, Nita; Wareham, Nick; Butterworth, Adam; Riboli, Elio; Danesh, John (2019)
    Background: There is uncertainty about the relevance of animal foods to the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease (IHD). We examined meat, fish, dairy products, and eggs and risk for IHD in the pan-European EPIC cohort (European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition). Methods: In this prospective study of 409 885 men and women in 9 European countries, diet was assessed with validated questionnaires and calibrated with 24-hour recalls. Lipids and blood pressure were measured in a subsample. During a mean of 12.6 years of follow-up, 7198 participants had a myocardial infarction or died of IHD. The relationships of animal foods with risk were examined with Cox regression with adjustment for other animal foods and relevant covariates. Results: The hazard ratio (HR) for IHD was 1.19 (95% CI, 1.06-1.33) for a 100-g/d increment in intake of red and processed meat, and this remained significant after exclusion of the first 4 years of follow-up (HR, 1.25 [95% CI, 1.09-1.42]). Risk was inversely associated with intakes of yogurt (HR, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.89-0.98] per 100-g/d increment), cheese (HR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.86-0.98] per 30-g/d increment), and eggs (HR, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.88-0.99] per 20-g/d increment); the associations with yogurt and eggs were attenuated and nonsignificant after exclusion of the first 4 years of follow-up. Risk was not significantly associated with intakes of poultry, fish, or milk. In analyses modeling dietary substitutions, replacement of 100 kcal/d from red and processed meat with 100 kcal/d from fatty fish, yogurt, cheese, or eggs was associated with approximate to 20% lower risk of IHD. Consumption of red and processed meat was positively associated with serum non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and systolic blood pressure, and consumption of cheese was inversely associated with serum non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusions: Risk for IHD was positively associated with consumption of red and processed meat and inversely associated with consumption of yogurt, cheese, and eggs, although the associations with yogurt and eggs may be influenced by reverse causation bias. It is not clear whether the associations with red and processed meat and cheese reflect causality, but they were consistent with the associations of these foods with plasma non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and for red and processed meat with systolic blood pressure, which could mediate such effects.
  • Omoruyi, Iyekhoetin Matthew; Ahamioje, Derek; Pohjanvirta, Raimo (2014)
  • Kynkäänniemi, Emma; Lahtinen, Maarit; Jian, Ching; Salonen, Anne; Hatanpää, Timo; Mikkonen, Kirsi S.; Pajari, Anne-Maria (2022)
    Birch-derived glucuronoxylan (GX)-rich hemicellulose extract is an abundantly available by-product of the forest industry. It has multifunctional food stabilizing properties, and is rich in fiber and polyphenols. Here, we studied its effects on colonic metabolism and gut microbiota in healthy rats. Male and female Wistar rats (n = 42) were fed AIN-93G-based diets with 10% (w/w) of either cellulose (control), a polyphenol and GX-rich extract (GXpoly), or a highly purified GX-rich extract (pureGX) for four weeks. Both the GXpoly and pureGX diets resulted in changes on the gut microbiota, especially in a higher abundance of Bifidobacteriaceae than the cellulose containing diet (p < 0.001). This coincided with higher concentrations of microbial metabolites in the luminal contents of the GX-fed than control rats, such as total short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) (p < 0.001), acetate (p < 0.001), and N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) (p = 0.001). The difference in the concentration of NOCs was not seen when adjusted with fecal weight. GX supplementation supported the normal growth of the rats. Our results indicate that GXpoly and pureGX can favorably affect colonic metabolism and the gut microbiota. They have high potential to be used as prebiotic stabilizers to support more ecologically sustainable food production.