Browsing by Subject "RED-SEQUENCE"

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  • Mirkazemi, M.; Finoguenov, A.; Pereira, M. J.; Tanaka, M.; Lerchster, M.; Brimioulle, F.; Egami, E.; Kettula, K.; Erfanianfar, G.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Kneib, J. P.; Rykoff, E.; Seitz, S.; Erben, T.; Taylor, J. E. (2015)
  • Strazzullo, V.; Coogan, R. T.; Daddi, E.; Sargent, M. T.; Gobat, R.; Valentino, F.; Bethermin, M.; Pannella, M.; Dickinson, M.; Renzini, A.; Arimoto, N.; Cimatti, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Finoguenov, A.; Liu, D.; Onodera, M. (2018)
    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array observations of the 870 mu m continuum and CO(4-3) line emission in the core of the galaxy cluster Cl J1449+0856 at z = 2, a near-IR-selected, X-ray-detected system in the mass range of typical progenitors of today's massive clusters. The 870 mu m map reveals six F-870 mu m > 0.5 mJy sources spread over an area of 0.07 arcmin(2), giving an overdensity of a factor of similar to 10 (6) with respect to blank-field counts down to F-870 mu m > 1 mJy (> 0.5 mJy). On the other hand, deep CO(4-3) follow-up confirms membership of three of these sources but suggests that the remaining three, including the brightest 870 mu m sources in the field (F-870 mu m greater than or similar to 2 mJy), are likely interlopers. The measurement of 870 mu m continuum and CO(4-3) line fluxes at the positions of previously known cluster members provides a deep probe of dusty star formation occurring in the core of this high-redshift structure, adding up to a total star formation rate of similar to 700 +/- 100 M-circle dot yr(-1) and yielding an integrated star formation rate density of similar to 10(4) M-circle dot yr(-1) Mpc(-3), five orders of magnitude larger than in the field at the same epoch, due to the concentration of star-forming galaxies in the small volume of the dense cluster core. The combination of these observations with previously available Hubble Space Telescope imaging highlights the presence in this same volume of a population of galaxies with already suppressed star formation. This diverse composition of galaxy populations in Cl J1449+0856 is especially highlighted at the very cluster center, where a complex assembly of quiescent and star-forming sources is likely forming the future brightest cluster galaxy.
  • Euclid Collaboration; Adam, R.; Kurki-Suonio, H. (2019)
    Galaxy cluster counts in bins of mass and redshift have been shown to be a competitive probe to test cosmological models. This method requires an efficient blind detection of clusters from surveys with a well-known selection function and robust mass estimates, which is particularly challenging at high redshift. The Euclid wide survey will cover 15 000 deg(2) of the sky, avoiding contamination by light from our Galaxy and our solar system in the optical and near-infrared bands, down to magnitude 24 in the H-band. The resulting data will make it possible to detect a large number of galaxy clusters spanning a wide-range of masses up to redshift similar to 2 and possibly higher. This paper presents the final results of the Euclid Cluster Finder Challenge (CFC), fourth in a series of similar challenges. The objective of these challenges was to select the cluster detection algorithms that best meet the requirements of the Euclid mission. The final CFC included six independent detection algorithms, based on different techniques, such as photometric redshift tomography, optimal filtering, hierarchical approach, wavelet and friend-of-friends algorithms. These algorithms were blindly applied to a mock galaxy catalog with representative Euclid-like properties. The relative performance of the algorithms was assessed by matching the resulting detections to known clusters in the simulations down to masses of M-200 similar to 10(13.25) M-circle dot. Several matching procedures were tested, thus making it possible to estimate the associated systematic effects on completeness to 80% completeness for a mean purity of 80% down to masses of 10(14) M-circle dot and up to redshift z = 2. Based on these results, two algorithms were selected to be implemented in the Euclid pipeline, the Adaptive Matched Identifier of Clustered Objects (AMICO) code, based on matched filtering, and the PZWav code, based on an adaptive wavelet approach.
  • Balogh, Michael L.; Mcgee, Sean L.; Mok, Angus; Muzzin, Adam; van der Burg, Remco F. J.; Bower, Richard G.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Hoekstra, Henk; Lidman, Chris; Mulchaey, John S.; Noble, Allison; Parker, Laura C.; Tanaka, Masayuki; Wilman, David J.; Webb, Tracy; Wilson, Gillian; Yee, Howard K. C. (2016)
    We present an analysis of galaxies in groups and clusters at 0.8 <z <1.2, from the GCLASS and GEEC2 spectroscopic surveys. We compute a 'conversion fraction' f(convert) that represents the fraction of galaxies that were prematurely quenched by their environment. For massive galaxies, M-star > 10(10.3) M-circle dot, we find f(convert) similar to 0.4 in the groups and similar to 0.6 in the clusters, similar to comparable measurements at z = 0. This means the time between first accretion into a more massive halo and final star formation quenching is t(p) similar to 2 Gyr. This is substantially longer than the estimated time required for a galaxy's star formation rate to become zero once it starts to decline, suggesting there is a long delay time during which little differential evolution occurs. In contrast with local observations we find evidence that this delay time-scale may depend on stellarmass, with t(p) approaching t(Hubble) for M-star similar to 10(9.5) M-circle dot. The result suggests that the delay time must not only be much shorter than it is today, but may also depend on stellar mass in a way that is not consistent with a simple evolution in proportion to the dynamical time. Instead, we find the data are well-matched by a model in which the decline in star formation is due to 'overconsumption', the exhaustion of a gas reservoir through star formation and expulsion via modest outflows in the absence of cosmological accretion. Dynamical gas removal processes, which are likely dominant in quenching newly accreted satellites today, may play only a secondary role at z = 1.
  • Balogh, Michael L.; Gilbank, David G.; Muzzin, Adam; Rudnick, Gregory; Cooper, Michael C.; Lidman, Chris; Biviano, Andrea; Demarco, Ricardo; McGee, Sean L.; Nantais, Julie B.; Noble, Allison; Old, Lyndsay; Wilson, Gillian; Yee, Howard K. C.; Bellhouse, Callum; Cerulo, Pierluigi; Chan, Jeffrey; Pintos-Castro, Irene; Simpson, Rane; van der Burg, Remco F. J.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Ziparo, Felicia; Victoria Alonso, Maria; Bower, Richard G.; De Lucia, Gabriella; Finoguenov, Alexis; Garcia Lambas, Diego; Muriel, Hernan; Parker, Laura C.; Rettura, Alessandro; Valotto, Carlos; Wetzel, Andrew (2017)
    We describe a new Large Program in progress on the Gemini North and South telescopes: Gemini Observations of Galaxies in Rich Early Environments (GOGREEN). This is an imaging and deep spectroscopic survey of 21 galaxy systems at 1 <z <1.5, selected to span a factor > 10 in halo mass. The scientific objectives include measuring the role of environment in the evolution of low-mass galaxies, and measuring the dynamics and stellar contents of their host haloes. The targets are selected from the SpARCS, SPT, COSMOS, and SXDS surveys, to be the evolutionary counterparts of today's clusters and groups. The new red-sensitive Hamamatsu detectors on GMOS, coupled with the nod-and-shuffle sky subtraction, allow simultaneous wavelength coverage over lambda similar to 0.6-1.05 mu m, and this enables a homogeneous and statistically complete redshift survey of galaxies of all types. The spectroscopic sample targets galaxies with AB magnitudes z' <24.25 and [3.6] mu m <22.5, and is therefore statistically complete for stellar masses M* greater than or similar to 10(10.3) M-circle dot, for all galaxy types and over the entire redshift range. Deep, multiwavelength imaging has been acquired over larger fields for most systems, spanning u through K, in addition to deep IRAC imaging at 3.6 mu m. The spectroscopy is similar to 50 per cent complete as of semester 17A, and we anticipate a final sample of similar to 500 new cluster members. Combined with existing spectroscopy on the brighter galaxies from GCLASS, SPT, and other sources, GOGREEN will be a large legacy cluster and field galaxy sample at this redshift that spectroscopically covers a wide range in stellar mass, halo mass, and clustercentric radius.
  • Galametz, Audrey; Pentericci, Laura; Castellano, Marco; Mendel, Trevor; Hartley, Will G.; Fossati, Matteo; Finoguenov, Alexis; Almaini, Omar; Beifiori, Alessandra; Fontana, Adriano; Grazian, Andrea; Scodeggio, Marco; Kocevski, Dale D. (2018)
    We present a large-scale galaxy structure C1 J021734-0513 at z similar to 0.65 discovered in the UKIDSS UDS field, made of similar to 20 galaxy groups and clusters, spreading over 10 Mpc. We report on a VLT/VIMOS spectroscopic follow-up program that, combined with past spectroscopy, allowed us to confirm four galaxy clusters (M-200 similar to 10(14) M-circle dot) and a dozen associated groups and star-forming galaxy overdensities. Two additional filamentary structures at z similar to 0.62 and 0.69 and foreground and background clusters at 0.6 <z <0.7 were also confirmed along the line of sight. The structure subcomponents are at different formation stages. The clusters have a core dominated by passive galaxies and an established red sequence. The remaining structures are a mix of star-forming galaxy overdensities and forming groups. The presence of quiescent galaxies in the core of the latter shows that 'pre-processing' has already happened before the groups fall into their more massive neighbours. Our spectroscopy allows us to derive spectral index measurements e.g. emission/absorption line equivalent widths, strength of the 4000 angstrom break, valuable to investigate the star formation history of structure members. Based on these line measurements, we select a population of 'post-starburst' galaxies. These galaxies are preferentially found within the virial radius of clusters, supporting a scenario in which their recent quenching could be prompted by gas stripping by the dense intracluster medium. We derive stellar age estimates using Markov Chain Monte Carlo-based spectral fitting for quiescent galaxies and find a correlation between ages and colours/stellar masses which favours a top-down formation scenario of the red sequence. A catalogue of similar to 650 redshifts in UDS is released alongside the paper (via MNRAS online data).
  • Pawlik, M. M.; Wild, V.; Walcher, C. J.; Johansson, P. H.; Villforth, C.; Rowlands, K.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Hewlett, T. (2016)
    We present a new morphological indicator designed for automated recognition of galaxies with faint asymmetric tidal features suggestive of an ongoing or past merger. We use the new indicator, together with pre-existing diagnostics of galaxy structure to study the role of galaxy mergers in inducing (post-) starburst spectral signatures in local galaxies, and investigate whether (post-) starburst galaxies play a role in the build-up of the 'red sequence'. Our morphological and structural analysis of an evolutionary sample of 335 (post-) starburst galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 with starburst ages 0 <t(SB) <0.6 Gyr, shows that 45 per cent of galaxies with young starbursts (t(SB) <0.1 Gyr) show signatures of an ongoing or past merger. This fraction declines with starburst age, and we find a good agreement between automated and visual classifications. The majority of the oldest (post-) starburst galaxies in our sample (t(SB) similar to 0.6 Gyr) have structural properties characteristic of early-type discs and are not as highly concentrated as the fully quenched galaxies commonly found on the 'red sequence' in the present day Universe. This suggests that, if (post-) starburst galaxies are a transition phase between active star-formation and quiescence, they do not attain the structure of presently quenched galaxies within the first 0.6 Gyr after the starburst.
  • Pawlik, M. M.; McAlpine, S.; Trayford, J. W.; Wild, V.; Bower, R.; Crain, R. A.; Schaller, M.; Schaye, J. (2019)
    About 35 years ago a class of galaxies with unusually strong Balmer absorption lines and weak emission lines was discovered in distant galaxy clusters(1,2). These objects, alternatively referred to as post-starburst, E+A or k+a galaxies, are now known to occur in all environments and at all redshifts(3-7), with many exhibiting compact morphologies and low-surface brightness features indicative of past galaxy mergers(3,8). They are commonly thought to represent galaxies that are transitioning from blue to red sequence, making them critical to our understanding of the origins of galaxy bimodality(9-14). However, recent observational studies have questioned this simple interpretation(15-18). From observations alone, it is challenging to disentangle the different mechanisms that lead to the quenching of star formation in galaxies. Here we present examples of three different evolutionary pathways that lead to galaxies with strong Balmer absorption lines in the Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environments (EAGLE) simulation(19,20): classical blue -> red quenching, blue -> blue cycle and red -> red rejuvenation. The first two are found in both post-starburst galaxies and galaxies with truncated star formation. Each pathway is consistent with scenarios hypothesized for observational samples(2,15,18,21,22). The fact that 'post-starburst' signatures can be attained via various evolutionary channels explains the diversity of observed properties, and lends support to the idea that slower quenching channels are important at low redshift(23,24).
  • Balogh, Michael L.; van der Burg, Remco F. J.; Muzzin, Adam; Rudnick, Gregory; Wilson, Gillian; Webb, Kristi; Biviano, Andrea; Boak, Kevin; Cerulo, Pierluigi; Chan, Jeffrey; Cooper, M. C.; Gilbank, David G.; Gwyn, Stephen; Lidman, Chris; Matharu, Jasleen; McGee, Sean L.; Old, Lyndsay; Pintos-Castro, Irene; Reeves, Andrew M. M.; Shipley, Heath; Vulcani, Benedetta; Yee, Howard K. C.; Alonso, M. Victoria; Bellhouse, Callum; Cooke, Kevin C.; Davidson, Anna; De Lucia, Gabriella; Demarco, Ricardo; Drakos, Nicole; Fillingham, Sean P.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Ben Forrest,; Golledge, Caelan; Jablonka, Pascale; Garcia, Diego Lambas; McNab, Karen; Muriel, Hernan; Nantais, Julie B.; Noble, Allison; Parker, Laura C.; Petter, Grayson; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Townsend, Melinda; Valotto, Carlos; Webb, Tracy; Zaritsky, Dennis (2021)
    We present the first public data release of the GOGREEN (Gemini Observations of Galaxies in Rich Early Environments) and GCLASS (Gemini CLuster Astrophysics Spectroscopic Survey) surveys of galaxies in dense environments, spanning a redshift range 0.8 <z <1.5. The surveys consist of deep, multiwavelength photometry and extensive Gemini GMOS spectroscopy of galaxies in 26 overdense systems ranging in halo mass from small groups to the most massive clusters. The objective of both projects was primarily to understand how the evolution of galaxies is affected by their environment, and to determine the physical processes that lead to the quenching of star formation. There was an emphasis on obtaining unbiased spectroscopy over a wide stellar mass range (M greater than or similar to 2 x 10(10) M-circle dot), throughout and beyond the cluster virialized regions. The final spectroscopic sample includes 2771 unique objects, of which 2257 have reliable spectroscopic redshifts. Of these, 1704 have redshifts in the range 0.8 <z <1.5, and nearly 800 are confirmed cluster members. Imaging spans the full optical and near-infrared wavelength range, at depths comparable to the UltraVISTA survey, and includes Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 F160W (GOGREEN) and F140W (GCLASS). This data release includes fully reduced images and spectra, with catalogues of advanced data products including redshifts, line strengths, star formation rates, stellar masses, and rest-frame colours. Here, we present an overview of the data, including an analysis of the spectroscopic completeness and redshift quality.
  • Reeves, Andrew M. M.; Balogh, Michael L.; van der Burg, Remco F. J.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Kukstas, Egidijus; McCarthy, Ian G.; Webb, Kristi; Muzzin, Adam; McGee, Sean; Rudnick, Gregory; Biviano, Andrea; Cerulo, Pierluigi; Chan, Jeffrey C. C.; Cooper, M. C.; Demarco, Ricardo; Jablonka, Pascale; De Lucia, Gabriella; Vulcani, Benedetta; Wilson, Gillian; Yee, Howard K. C.; Zaritsky, Dennis (2021)
    We use photometric redshifts and statistical background subtraction to measure stellar mass functions in galaxy group-mass (4.5-8 x 10(13) M-circle dot) haloes at 1 < z < 1.5. Groups are selected from COSMOS and SXDF, based on X-ray imaging and sparse spectroscopy. Stellar mass (M-stell(ar)) functions are computed for quiescent and star-forming galaxies separately, based on their rest-frame UVJ colours. From these we compute the quiescent fraction and quiescent fraction excess (QFE) relative to the field as a function of M-stel(lar). QFE increases with M-st(ellar), similar to more massive clusters at 1 < z < 1.5. This contrasts with the apparent separability of M-stellar, and environmental factors on galaxy quiescent fractions at z similar to 0. We then compare our results with higher mass clusters at 1 < z < 1.5 and lower redshifts. We find a strong QFE dependence on halo mass at fixed M-ste(ll)ar; well fit by a logarithmic slope of d(QFE)/dlog (M-halo) similar to 0.24 +/- 0.04 for all M-stellar and redshift bins. This dependence is in remarkably good qualitative agreement with the hydrodynamic simulation BAHAMAS, but contradicts the observed dependence of QFE on M-stellar. We interpret the results using two toy models: one where a time delay until rapid (instantaneous) quenching begins upon accretion to the main progenitor ( 'no pre-processing') and one where it starts upon first becoming a satellite ('pre-processing'). Delay times appear to be halo mass-dependent, with a significantly stronger dependence required without pre-processing. We conclude that our results support models in which environmental quenching begins in low-mass ( 1.