Browsing by Subject "REPLICATION"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-20 of 42
  • Abdelnabi, Rana; Geraets, James A.; Ma, Yipeng; Mirabelli, Carmen; Flatt, Justin W.; Domanska, Ausra; Delang, Leen; Jochmans, Dirk; Kumar, Timiri Ajay; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan; Sinha, Barij Nayan; Leyssen, Pieter; Butcher, Sarah J.; Neyts, Johan (2019)
    Rhino- and enteroviruses are important human pathogens, against which no antivirals are available. The best-studied inhibitors are capsid binders that fit in a hydrophobic pocket of the viral capsid. Employing a new class of entero-/rhinovirus inhibitors and by means of cryo-electron microscopy (EM), followed by resistance selection and reverse genetics, we discovered a hitherto unknown druggable pocket that is formed by viral proteins VP1 and VP3 and that is conserved across entero-/rhinovirus species. We propose that these inhibitors stabilize a key region of the virion, thereby preventing the conformational expansion needed for viral RNA release. A medicinal chemistry effort resulted in the identification of analogues targeting this pocket with broad-spectrum activity against Coxsackieviruses B (CVBs) and compounds with activity against enteroviruses (EV) of groups C and D, and even rhinoviruses (RV). Our findings provide novel insights in the biology of the entry of entero-/rhinoviruses and open new avenues for the design of broad-spectrum antivirals against these pathogens.
  • Windbichler, Katharina; Michalopoulou, Eleni; Palamides, Pia; Pesch, Theresa; Jelinek, Christine; Vapalahti, Olli; Kipar, Anja; Hetzel, Udo; Hepojoki, Jussi (2019)
    Boid Inclusion Body Disease (BIBD) is a potentially fatal disease reported in captive boid snakes worldwide that is caused by reptarenavirus infection. Although the detection of intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies (IB) in blood cells serves as the gold standard for the ante mortem diagnosis of BIBD, the mechanisms underlying IB formation and the pathogenesis of BIBD are unknown. Knowledge on the reptile immune system is sparse compared to the mammalian counterpart, and in particular the response towards reptarenavirus infection is practically unknown. Herein, we investigated a breeding collection of 70 Boa constrictor snakes for BIBD, reptarenavirus viraemia, anti-reptarenavirus IgM and IgY antibodies, and population parameters. Using NGS and RT-PCR on pooled blood samples of snakes with and without BIBD, we could identify three different reptarenavirus S segments in the collection. The examination of individual samples by RT-PCR indicated that the presence of University of Giessen virus (UGV)-like S segment strongly correlates with IB formation. We could also demonstrate a negative correlation between BIBD and the presence of anti-UGV NP IgY antibodies. Further evidence of an association between antibody response and BIBD is the finding that the level of anti-reptarenavirus antibodies measured by ELISA was lower in snakes with BIBD. Furthermore, female snakes had a significantly lower body weight when they had BIBD. Taken together our findings suggest that the detection of the UGV-/S6-like S segment and the presence of anti-reptarenavirus IgY antibodies might serve as a prognostic tool for predicting the development of BIBD.
  • Kakkola, L.; Denisova, O. V.; Tynell, J.; Viiliainen, J.; Ysenbaert, T.; Matos, R. C.; Nagaraj, A.; Öhman, Tiina; Kuivanen, S.; Paavilainen, H.; Feng, L.; Yadav, B.; Julkunen, I.; Vapalahti, O.; Hukkanen, V.; Stenman, J.; Aittokallio, T.; Verschuren, E. W.; Ojala, P. M.; Nyman, T.; Saelens, X.; Dzeyk, K.; Kainov, D. E. (2013)
  • Bulanova, Daria; Ianevski, Aleksandr; Bugai, Andrii; Akimov, Yevhen; Kuivanen, Suvi; Paavilainen, Henrik; Kakkola, Laura; Nandania, Jatin; Turunen, Laura; Ohman, Tiina; Ala-Hongisto, Hanna; Pesonen, Hanna M.; Kuisma, Marika S.; Honkimaa, Anni; Walton, Emma L.; Oksenych, Valentyn; Lorey, Martina B.; Guschin, Dmitry; Shim, Jungmin; Kim, Jinhee; Than, Thoa T.; Chang, So Young; Hukkanen, Veijo; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Marjomaki, Varpu S.; Julkunen, Ilkka; Nyman, Tuula A.; Matikainen, Sampsa; Saarela, Jani S.; Sane, Famara; Hober, Didier; Gabriel, Guelsah; De Brabander, Jef K.; Martikainen, Miika; Windisch, Marc P.; Min, Ji-Young; Bruzzone, Roberto; Aittokallio, Tero; Vaha-Koskela, Markus; Vapalahti, Olli; Pulk, Arto; Velagapudi, Vidya; Kainov, Denis E. (2017)
    Viral diseases remain serious threats to public health because of the shortage of effective means of control. To combat the surge of viral diseases, new treatments are urgently needed. Here we show that small-molecules, which inhibit cellular anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins (Bcl-2i), induced the premature death of cells infected with different RNA or DNA viruses, whereas, at the same concentrations, no toxicity was observed in mock-infected cells. Moreover, these compounds limited viral replication and spread. Surprisingly, Bcl-2i also induced the premature apoptosis of cells transfected with viral RNA or plasmid DNA but not of mock-transfected cells. These results suggest that Bcl-2i sensitizes cells containing foreign RNA or DNA to apoptosis. A comparison of the toxicity, antiviral activity, and side effects of six Bcl-2i allowed us to select A-1155463 as an antiviral lead candidate. Thus, our results pave the way for the further development of Bcl-2i for the prevention and treatment of viral diseases.
  • Swarnalok, De; Pollari, Maija; Varjosalo, Markku; Mäkinen, Kristiina (2020)
    In this study, we investigated the significance of a conserved five-amino acid motif 'AELPR' in the C-terminal region of helper component-proteinase (HCPro) for potato virus A (PVA; genusPotyvirus) infection. This motif is a putative interaction site for WD40 domain-containing proteins, including VARICOSE (VCS). We abolished the interaction site in HCPro by replacing glutamic acid (E) and arginine (R) with alanines (A) to generate HCPro(WD). These mutations partially eliminated HCPro-VCS co-localization in cells. We have earlier described potyvirus-induced RNA granules (PGs) in which HCPro and VCS co-localize and proposed that they have a role in RNA silencing suppression. We now demonstrate that the ability of HCPro(WD)to induce PGs, introduce VCS into PGs, and suppress RNA silencing was impaired. Accordingly, PVA carrying HCPro(WD)(PVA(WD)) infectedNicotiana benthamianaless efficiently than wild-type PVA (PVA(WT)) and HCPro(WD)complemented the lack of HCPro in PVA gene expression only partially. HCPro was purified from PVA-infected leaves as part of high molecular weight (HMW) ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. These complexes were more stable when associated with wild-type HCPro than with HCPro(WD). Moreover, VCS and two viral components of the HMW-complexes, viral protein genome-linked and cylindrical inclusion protein were specifically decreased in HCPro(WD)-containing HMW-complexes. A boost in translation of replication-deficient PVA (PVA(Delta GDD)) was observed only if viral RNA expressed wild-type HCPro. The role of VCS-VPg-HCPro coordination in PVA translation was further supported by results from VCS silencing and overexpression experiments and by significantly elevated PVA-derivedRenillaluciferase vs PVA RNA ratio upon VPg-VCS co-expression. Finally, we found that PVA(WD)was unable to form virus particles or to spread systemically in the infected plant. We highlight the role of HCPro-VCS containing multi-protein assemblies associated with PVA RNA in protecting it from degradation, ensuring efficient translation, formation of stable virions and establishment of systemic infection. Author summary This study revealed that the potyviral helper component proteinase (HCPro) and the host protein VARICOSE (VCS) are linked in a manner that is important for suppression of RNA silencing, formation of potyvirus-induced RNA granules, translation of viral proteins, stability of virions, and development of systemic potato virus A (PVA) infection. The results suggest that HCPro and VCS belong to the core components of large RNP complexes regulating PVA infection. We suggest that these complexes protect viral RNAs in the cytoplasm after release from the replication complex and direct them to translation and intact to the viral particles.
  • Autio, Karoliina P. M.; Ruotsalainen, Janne J.; Anttila, Marjukka O.; Niittykoski, Minna; Waris, Matti; Hemminki, Akseli; Vähä-Koskela, Markus J. V.; Hinkkanen, Ari E. (2015)
    Background: Dogs suffer from spontaneous tumors which may be amenable to therapies developed for human cancer patients, and dogs may serve as large-animal cancer models. A non-pathogenic Semliki Forest virus vector VA7-EGFP previously showed promise in targeting human tumor xenografts in mice, but the oncolytic capacity of the virus in canine cancer cells and the safety of the virus in higher mammals such as dogs, are not known. We therefore assessed the oncolytic potency of VA7-EGFP against canine cancer cells by infectivity and viability assays in two dog solid tumor cell lines. Furthermore we performed a 3-week safety study in two adult Beagles which received a single intravenous injection of similar to 2 x 10(5) plaque forming units of parental A7(74) strain. Results: VA7-EGFP was able to replicate in and kill both canine cancer cell lines tested. No adverse events were observed in either of the two virus-injected adult Beagles and no infective virus could be recovered from any of the biological samples collected over the course of the study. Neutralizing antibodies to Semliki Forest virus became detectable in the dogs at 5 days post infection and remained elevated until study termination. Conclusions: Based on these results, testing of the oncolytic potential of attenuated Semliki Forest virus in canine cancer patients appears feasible.
  • Toppinen, M.; Perdomo, Maria; Palo, J. U.; Simmonds, P.; Lycett, S. J.; Soderlund-Venermo, M.; Sajantila, A.; Hedman, K. (2015)
    DNA in human skeletal remains represents an important historical source of host genomic information and potentially of infecting viruses. However, little is known about viral persistence in bone. We searched ca. 70-year-old long bones of putative Finnish casualties from World War II for parvovirus B19 (B19V) DNA, and found a remarkable prevalence of 45%. The viral sequences were exclusively of genotypes 2 (n = 41), which disappeared from circulation in 1970's, or genotype 3 (n = 2), which has never been reported in Northern Europe. Based on mitochondrial and Y-chromosome profiling, the two individuals carrying B19V genotype 3 were likely from the Soviet Red Army. The most recent common ancestor for all genotypes was estimated at early 1800s. This work demonstrates the forms of B19V that circulated in the first half of the 20th century and provides the first evidence of the suitability of bone for exploration of DNA viruses.
  • Hepojoki, Jussi; Hepojoki, Satu; Smura, Teemu; Szirovicza, Leonora; Dervas, Eva; Prahauser, Barbara; Nufer, Lisbeth; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Vapalahti, Olli; Kipar, Anja; Hetzel, Udo (2018)
    The family Arenaviridae comprises three genera, Mammarenavirus, Reptarenavirus and the most recently added Hartmanivirus. Arenaviruses have a bisegmented genome with ambisense coding strategy. For mammarenaviruses and reptarenaviruses the L segment encodes the Z protein (ZP) and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and the S segment encodes the glycoprotein precursor and the nucleoprotein. Herein we report the full length genome and characterization of Haartman Institute snake virus-1 (HISV-1), the putative type species of hartmaniviruses. The L segment of HISV-1 lacks an open-reading frame for ZP, and our analysis of purified HISV-1 particles by SDS-PAGE and electron microscopy further support the lack of ZP. Since we originally identified HISV-1 in co-infection with a reptarenavirus, one could hypothesize that co-infecting reptarenavirus provides the ZP to complement HISV-1. However, we observed that co-infection does not markedly affect the amount of hartmanivirus or reptarenavirus RNA released from infected cells in vitro, indicating that HISV-1 does not benefit from reptarenavirus ZP. Furthermore, we succeeded in generating a pure HISV-1 isolate showing the virus to replicate without ZP. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural studies demonstrate that, unlike reptarenaviruses, HISV-1 does not produce the intracellular inclusion bodies typical for the reptarenavirus-induced boid inclusion body disease (BIBD). While we observed HISV-1 to be slightly cytopathic for cultured boid cells, the histological and immunohistological investigation of HISV-positive snakes showed no evidence of a pathological effect. The histological analyses also revealed that hartmaniviruses, unlike reptarenaviruses, have a limited tissue tropism. By nucleic acid sequencing, de novo genome assembly, and phylogenetic analyses we identified additional four hartmanivirus species. Finally, we screened 71 individuals from a collection of snakes with BIBD by RT-PCR and found 44 to carry hartmaniviruses. These findings suggest that harmaniviruses are common in captive snake populations, but their relevance and pathogenic potential needs yet to be revealed.
  • Keller, Saskia; Hetzel, Udo; Sironen, Tarja; Korzyukov, Yegor; Vapalahti, Olli; Kipar, Anja; Hepojoki, Jussi (2017)
    Boid inclusion body disease (BIBD) is an often fatal disease affecting mainly constrictor snakes. BIBD has been associated with infection, and more recently with coinfection, by various reptarenavirus species (family Arenaviridae). Thus far BIBD has only been reported in captive snakes, and neither the incubation period nor the route of transmission are known. Herein we provide strong evidence that co-infecting reptarenavirus species can be vertically transmitted in Boa constrictor. In total we examined five B. constrictor clutches with offspring ranging in age from embryos over perinatal abortions to juveniles. The mother and/or father of each clutch were initially diagnosed with BIBD andor reptarenavirus infection by detection of the pathognomonic inclusion bodies (IB) andor reptarenaviral RNA. By applying next-generation sequencing and de novo sequence assembly we determined the "reptarenavirome " of each clutch, yielding several nearly complete L and S segments of multiple reptarenaviruses. We further confirmed vertical transmission of the co-infecting reptarenaviruses by species-specific RT-PCR from samples of parental animals and offspring. Curiously, not all offspring obtained the full parental "reptarenavirome". We extended our findings by an in vitro approach; cell cultures derived from embryonal samples rapidly developed IB and promoted replication of some or all parental viruses. In the tissues of embryos and perinatal abortions, viral antigen was sometimes detected, but IB were consistently seen only in the juvenile snakes from the age of 2 mo onwards. In addition to demonstrating vertical transmission of multiple species, our results also indicate that reptarenavirus infection induces BIBD over time in the offspring.
  • Heino, Matti T. J.; Fried, Eiko I.; LeBel, Etienne P. (2017)
  • Cervera-Carrascon, Victor; Quixabeira, Dafne C.A.; Havunen, Riikka; Santos, Joao M.; Kutvonen, Emma; Clubb, James H.A.; Siurala, Mikko; Heiniö, Camilla; Zafar, Sadia; Koivula, Teija; Lumen, Dave; Vaha, Marjo; Garcia-Horsman, Arturo; Airaksinen, Anu J.; Sorsa, Suvi; Anttila, Marjukka; Hukkanen, Veijo; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2020)
    Despite some promising results, the majority of patients do not benefit from T-cell therapies, as tumors prevent T-cells from entering the tumor, shut down their activity, or downregulate key antigens. Due to their nature and mechanism of action, oncolytic viruses have features that can help overcome many of the barriers currently facing T-cell therapies of solid tumors. This study aims to understand how four different oncolytic viruses (adenovirus, vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus and reovirus) perform in that task. For that purpose, an immunocompetent in vivo tumor model featuring adoptive tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy was used. Tumor growth control (p
  • Das, Pratyush Kumar; Puusepp, Laura; Varghese, Finny S.; Utt, Age; Ahola, Tero; Kananovich, Dzmitry G.; Lopp, Margus; Merits, Andres; Karelson, Mati (2016)
    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV; genus Alphavirus) is the causative agent of chikungunya fever. CHIKV replication can be inhibited by some broad-spectrum antiviral compounds; in contrast, there is very little information about compounds specifically inhibiting the enzymatic activities of CHIKV replication proteins. These proteins are translated in the form of a nonstructural (ns) P1234 polyprotein precursor from the CHIKV positive-strand RNA genome. Active forms of replicase enzymes are generated using the autoproteolytic activity of nsP2. The available three-dimensional (3D) structure of nsP2 protease has made it a target for in silico drug design; however, there is thus far little evidence that the designed compounds indeed inhibit the protease activity of nsP2 and/or suppress CHIKV replication. In this study, a set of 12 compounds, predicted to interact with the active center of nsP2 protease, was designed using target-based modeling. The majority of these compounds were shown to inhibit the ability of nsP2 to process recombinant protein and synthetic peptide substrates. Furthermore, all compounds found to be active in these cell-free assays also suppressed CHIKV replication in cell culture, the 50% effective concentration (EC50) of the most potent inhibitor being similar to 1.5 mu M. Analysis of stereoisomers of one compound revealed that inhibition of both the nsP2 protease activity and CHIKV replication depended on the conformation of the inhibitor. Combining the data obtained from different assays also indicates that some of the analyzed compounds may suppress CHIKV replication using more than one mechanism.
  • Mueller, Janis A.; Harms, Mirja; Schubert, Axel; Mayer, Benjamin; Jansen, Stephanie; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe; Michel, Detlef; Mertens, Thomas; Vapalahti, Olli; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Muench, Jan (2017)
    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen that causes congenital infections which may result in birth defects, such as microcephaly. Currently, no approved treatment or vaccination is available. ZIKV can be readily detected in cell culture where virally infected cells are normally stained by specific antibodies. As ZIKV regularly causes a cytopathic effect, we were wondering whether this viral property can be used to quantitatively determine viral infectivity. We here describe the use of an 3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide-(MTT)-based cell viability assay that allows to determine ZIKV-induced cell death. We show that this colorimetric assay quantifies ZIKV infection over a broad range of viral dilutions in both monkey and human cells. It allows to determine inhibitory activities of antivirals that block ZIKV or to define the neutralizing antibody titers of ZIKV antisera. This MTT-based ZIKV detection assay can be evaluated by naked eye or computational tools, has a broad linear range, does not require large equipment or costly reagents, and thus represents a promising alternative to antibody-based assays, in particular in resource-poor settings. We propose to use this simple, fast, and cheap method for quantification of ZIKV neutralizing antibodies and testing of antiviral compounds.
  • Andersen, Petter I.; Ianevski, Aleksandr; Lysvand, Hilde; Oksenych, Valentyn; Bjørås, Magnar; Telling, Kaidi; Lutsar, Irja; Dampis, Uga; Irie, Yasuhiko; Tenson, Tanel; Kantele, Anu; Kainov, Denis (2020)
    Viral diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. Virus-specific vaccines and antiviral drugs are the most powerful tools to combat viral diseases. However, broad-spectrum antiviral agents (BSAAs, i.e. compounds targeting viruses belonging to two or more viral families) could provide additional protection of the general population from emerging and re-emerging viral diseases, reinforcing the arsenal of available antiviral options. Here, we review discovery and development of BSAAs and summarize the information on 120 safe-in-man agents in a freely accessible database (https://drugvirus.info/). Future and ongoing pre-clinical and clinical studies will increase the number of BSAAs, expand the spectrum of their indications, and identify drug combinations for treatment of emerging and re-emerging viral infections as well as co-infections. (C) 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of International Society for Infectious Diseases.
  • De, Swarnalok; Chavez-Calvillo, Gabriela; Wahlsten, Matti; Mäkinen, Kristiina (2018)
    Infection caused by the synergistic interaction of two plant viruses is typically manifested by severe symptoms and increased accumulation of either virus. In potex-potyviral synergism, the potyviral RNA silencing suppressor helper component proteinase (HCPro) is known to enhance the pathogenicity of the potexvirus counterpart. In line with this, Potato virus X (PVX; genus Potexvirus) genomic RNA (gRNA) accumulation and gene expression from subgenomic RNA (sgRNA) are increased in Nicotiana benthamiana by Potato virus A (PVA; genus Potyvirus) HCPro expression. Recently, we have demonstrated that PVA HCPro interferes with the host cell methionine cycle by interacting with its key enzymes S-adenosyl-l-methionine synthetase (SAMS) and S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH). To study the involvement of methionine cycle enzymes in PVX infection, we knocked down SAMS and SAHH. Increased PVX sgRNA expression between 3 and 9 days post-infiltration (dpi) and upregulation of (-)-strand gRNA accumulation at 9 dpi were observed in the SAHH-silenced background. We found that SAMS and SAHH silencing also caused a significant reduction in glutathione (GSH) concentration, specifically in PVX-infected plants between 2 and 9 dpi. Interestingly, HCPro expression in PVX-infected plants caused an even stronger reduction in GSH levels than did SAMS+SAHH silencing and a similar level of reduction was also achieved by knocking down GSH synthetase. PVX sgRNA expression was increased in the GSH synthetase-silenced background. GSH is a major antioxidant of plant cells and therefore GSH shortage may explain the strong oxidative stress and severe symptoms observed during potex-potyvirus mixed infection.
  • Yanku, Yifat; Bitman-Lotan, Eliya; Zohar, Yaniv; Kurant, Estee; Zielke, Norman; Eilers, Martin; Orian, Amir (2018)
    The HECT-type ubiquitin ligase HECT, UBA and WWE Domain Containing 1, (HUWE1) regulates key cancer-related pathways, including the Myc oncogene. It affects cell proliferation, stress and immune signaling, mitochondria homeostasis, and cell death. HUWE1 is evolutionarily conserved from Caenorhabditis elegance to Drosophila melanogaster and Humans. Here, we report that the Drosophila ortholog, dHUWE1 (CG8184), is an essential gene whose loss results in embryonic lethality and whose tissue-specific disruption establishes its regulatory role in larval salivary gland development. dHUWE1 is essential for endoreplication of salivary gland cells and its knockdown results in the inability of these cells to replicate DNA. Remarkably, dHUWE1 is a survival factor that prevents premature activation of JNK signaling, thus preventing the disintegration of the salivary gland, which occurs physiologically during pupal stages. This function of dHUWE1 is general, as its inhibitory effect is observed also during eye development and at the organismal level. Epistatic studies revealed that the loss of dHUWE1 is compensated by dMyc proeitn expression or the loss of dmP53. dHUWE1 is therefore a conserved survival factor that regulates organ formation during Drosophila development.
  • Hyvarinen, Anne K.; Kumanto, Mona K.; Marjavaara, Sanna K.; Jacobs, Howard T. (2010)
  • Poelman, Randy; Schuffenecker, Isabelle; Van Leer-Buter, Coretta; Josset, Laurence; Niesters, Hubert G. M.; Lina, Bruno; Vuorinen, Tytti; ESCV-ECDC EV-D68 Study Grp; Lappalainen, Maija; Jääskeläinen, Anne; Smura, Teemu (2015)
    Background: In August and September 2014, unexpected clusters of enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) infections associated with severe respiratory disease emerged from North-America. In September, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) asked European countries to strengthen respiratory sample screening for enterovirus detection and typing in cases with severe respiratory presentations. Objectives: To provide a detailed picture of EV-D68 epidemiology in Europe by conducting a retrospective and prospective laboratory analysis of clinical specimens. Study design: An initiative supported by the European Society for Clinical Virology (ESCV) and ECDC was launched to screen for EV-D68 in respiratory specimens between July 1st and December 1st 2014 in Europe and to sequence the VP1 region of detected viruses for phylogenetic analytic purposes. Results: Forty-two institutes, representing 51 laboratories from 17 European countries, analyzed 17,248 specimens yielding 389 EV-D68 positive samples (2.26%) in 14 countries. The proportion of positive samples ranged between 0 and 25% per country. These infections resulted primarily in mild respiratory disease, mainly detected in young children presenting with wheezing and in immuno-compromised adults. The viruses detected in Europe are genetically very similar to those of the North-American epidemic and the majority (83%) could be assigned to clade B. Except for 3 acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases, one death and limited ICU admissions, no severe cases were reported. Conclusions: The European study showed that EV-D68 circulated in Europe during summer and fall of 2014 with a moderate disease burden and different pathogenic profile compared to the North-American epidemic. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Sauliene, Ingrida; Greiciuviene, Jurate; Sukiene, Laura; Juskeviciute, Neringa; Benner, Christian; Zinkeviciene, Aukse; Ripatti, Samuli; Donner, Kati; Kainov, Denis (2015)
    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a common and complex disease. It is associated with environmental as well as genetic factors. Three recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) reported altogether 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with AR or allergic sensitization (AS) in Europeans and North Americans. Two follow up studies in Swedish and Chinese replicated 15 associations. In these studies individuals were selected based on the self-reported AR, or AR/AS diagnosed using blood IgE test or skin prick test (SPT), which were performed often without restriction to specific allergens. Here we performed third replication study in Lithuanians. We used SPT and carefully selected set of allergens prevalent in Lithuania, as well as Illumina Core Exome chip for SNP detection. We genotyped 270 SPT-positive individuals (137 Betulaceae -, 174 Poaceae-, 199 Artemisia-, 70 Helianthus-, 22 Alternaria-, 22 Cladosporium-, 140 mites-, 95 cat-and 97 dog dander-sensitive cases) and 162 SPT-negative controls. We found altogether 13 known SNPs associated with AS (p
  • Savijoki, Kirsi; Miettinen, Ilkka; Nyman, Tuula; Kortesoja, Maarit; Hanski, Leena; Varmanen, Pekka; Fallarero, Adyary (2020)
    The present study investigated Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 surfaceomes (cell surface proteins) during prolonged growth by subjecting planktonic and biofilm cultures (initiated from exponential or stationary cells) to label-free quantitative surfaceomics and phenotypic confirmations. The abundance of adhesion, autolytic, hemolytic, and lipolytic proteins decreased over time in both growth modes, while an opposite trend was detected for many tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging, Fe-S repair, and peptidolytic moonlighters. In planktonic cells, these changes were accompanied by decreasing and increasing adherence to hydrophobic surface and fibronectin, respectively. Specific RNA/DNA binding (cold-shock protein CspD and ribosomal proteins) and the immune evasion (SpA, ClfA, and IsaB) proteins were notably more abundant on fully mature biofilms initiated with stationary-phase cells (SDBF) compared to biofilms derived from exponential cells (EDBF) or equivalent planktonic cells. The fully matured SDBF cells demonstrated higher viability in THP-1 monocyte/macrophage cells compared to the EDBF cells. Peptidoglycan strengthening, specific urea-cycle, and detoxification enzymes were more abundant on planktonic than biofilm cells, indicating the activation of growth-mode specific pathways during prolonged cultivation. Thus, we show that S. aureus shapes its surfaceome in a growth mode-dependent manner to reach high levofloxacin tolerance (>200-times the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration). This study also demonstrates that the phenotypic state of the cells prior to biofilm formation affects the immune-evasion and persistence-related traits of S. aureus.