Browsing by Subject "REVEALS"

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  • Kondelin, Johanna; Tuupanen, Sari; Gylfe, Alexandra E.; Aavikko, Mervi; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Järvinen, Heikki; Bohm, Jan; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Andersen, Claus L.; Vahteristo, Pia; Pitkanen, Esa; Aaltonen, Lauri A. (2015)
    Approximately 15 % of colorectal cancers exhibit instability of short nucleotide repeat regions, microsatellites. These tumors display a unique clinicopathologic profile and the microsatellite instability status is increasingly used to guide clinical management as it is known to predict better prognosis as well as resistance to certain chemotherapeutics. A panel of five repeats determined by the National Cancer Institute, the Bethesda panel, is currently the standard for determining the microsatellite instability status in colorectal cancer. Recently, a quasimonomorphic mononucleotide repeat 16T/U at the 3' untranslated region of the Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1 gene was reported to show perfect sensitivity and specificity in detecting mismatch repair deficient colorectal, endometrial, and gastric cancers in two independent populations. To confirm this finding, we replicated the analysis in 213 microsatellite unstable colorectal cancers from two independent populations, 148 microsatellite stable colorectal cancers, and the respective normal samples by PCR and fragment analysis. The repeat showed nearly perfect sensitivity for microsatellite unstable colorectal cancer as it was altered in 212 of the 213 microsatellite unstable (99.5 %) and none of the microsatellite stable colorectal tumors. This repeat thus represents the first potential single marker for detecting microsatellite instability.
  • Comai, Glenda; Heude, Eglantine; Mella, Sebastian; Paisant, Sylvain; Pala, Francesca; Gallardo, Mirialys; Langa, Francina; Kardon, Gabrielle; Gopalakrishnan, Swetha; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim (2019)
    In most vertebrates, the upper digestive tract is composed of muscularized jaws linked to the esophagus that permits food ingestion and swallowing. Masticatory and esophagus striated muscles (ESM) share a common cardiopharyngeal mesoderm (CPM) origin, however ESM are unusual among striated muscles as they are established in the absence of a primary skeletal muscle scaffold. Using mouse chimeras, we show that the transcription factors Tbx1 and Isl1 are required cell-autonomously for myogenic specification of ESM progenitors. Further, genetic loss-of-function and pharmacological studies point to MET/HGF signaling for antero-posterior migration of esophagus muscle progenitors, where Hgf ligand is expressed in adjacent smooth muscle cells. These observations highlight the functional relevance of a smooth and striated muscle progenitor dialogue for ESM patterning. Our findings establish a Tbx1-Isl1-Met genetic hierarchy that uniquely regulates esophagus myogenesis and identify distinct genetic signatures that can be used as framework to interpret pathologies arising within CPM derivatives.
  • Crespo, L.C.; Domenech, M; Enguídanos, A.; Malumbres-Olarte, Jagoba; Cardoso, Pedro; Moya-Larano, J; Frias-Lopez, Cristina; Macias Hernandez, Nuria Esther; de Mas, Eva; Mazzuca, Paola; Mora, E.; Opatova, Vera; Planas, Enric; Ribera, Carles; Roca-Cusachs, M.; Ruiz, D.; Sousa, Pedro; Tonzo, V.; Arnedo, M.A. (2018)
    Background A large scale semi-quantitative biodiversity assessment was conducted in white oak woodlands in areas included in the Spanish Network of National Parks, as part of a project aimed at revealing biogeographic patterns and identify biodiversity drivers. The semi-quantitative COBRA sampling protocol was conducted in sixteen 1-ha plots across six national parks using a nested design. All adult specimens were identified to species level based on morphology. Uncertain delimitations and identifications due to either limited information of diagnostic characters or conflicting taxonomy were further investigated using DNA barcode information. New information We identified 376 species belonging to 190 genera in 39 families, from the 8,521 adults found amongst the 20,539 collected specimens. Faunistic results include the discovery of 7 new species to the Iberian Peninsula, 3 new species to Spain and 11 putative new species to science. As largely expected by environmental features, the southern parks showed a higher proportion of Iberian and Mediterranean species than the northern parks, where the Palearctic elements were largely dominant. The analysis of approximately 3,200 DNA barcodes generated in the present study, corroborated and provided finer resolution to the morphologically based delimitation and identification of specimens in some taxonomically challenging families. Specifically, molecular data confirmed putative new species with diagnosable morphology, identified overlooked lineages that may constitute new species, confirmed assignment of specimens of unknown sexes to species and identified cases of misidentifications and phenotypic polymorphisms.
  • Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Schulz, Christina-Alexandra; Waage, Johannes; Skaaby, Tea; Sandholm, Niina; van Zuydam, Natalie; Charmet, Romain; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Almgren, Peter; Thuesen, Betina H.; Bedin, Mathilda; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer K.; Linneberg, Allan; Ahlqvist, Emma; Groop, Per-Henrik; Hadjadj, Samy; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Jorgensen, Marit E.; Grarup, Niels; Pedersen, Oluf; Simons, Matias; Groop, Leif; Orho-Melander, Marju; McCarthy, Mark I.; Melander, Olle; Rossing, Peter; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Hansen, Torben (2019)
    Aims/hypothesisIdentifying rare coding variants associated with albuminuria may open new avenues for preventing chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, which are highly prevalent in individuals with diabetes. Efforts to identify genetic susceptibility variants for albuminuria have so far been limited, with the majority of studies focusing on common variants.MethodsWe performed an exome-wide association study to identify coding variants in a two-stage (discovery and replication) approach. Data from 33,985 individuals of European ancestry (15,872 with and 18,113 without diabetes) and 2605 Greenlanders were included.ResultsWe identified a rare (minor allele frequency [MAF]: 0.8%) missense (A1690V) variant in CUBN (rs141640975, =0.27, p=1.3x10(-11)) associated with albuminuria as a continuous measure in the combined European meta-analysis. The presence of each rare allele of the variant was associated with a 6.4% increase in albuminuria. The rare CUBN variant had an effect that was three times stronger in individuals with type 2 diabetes compared with those without (p(interaction)=7.0x10(-4), with diabetes=0.69, without diabetes=0.20) in the discovery meta-analysis. Gene-aggregate tests based on rare and common variants identified three additional genes associated with albuminuria (HES1, CDC73 and GRM5) after multiple testing correction (p(Bonferroni)
  • Malhotra, Rajneesh; Kurian, Nisha; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Jiang, Fanyi; Monkley, Susan; DeMicco, Amy; Clausen, Ib G.; Dellgren, Göran; Edenro, Goran; Ahdesmaki, Miika J.; Clausen, Maryam; Oberg, Lisa; Israelsson, Elisabeth; Belfield, Graham; Vaarala, Outi (2017)
    Background BET proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRDT and BRD4) belong to the family of bromodomain containing proteins, which form a class of transcriptional co-regulators. BET proteins bind to acetylated lysine residues in the histones of nucleosomal chromatin and function either as co-activators or co-repressors of gene expression. An imbalance between HAT and HDAC activities resulting in hyperacetylation of histones has been identified in COPD. We hypothesized that pan-BET inhibitor (JQ1) treatment of BET protein interactions with hyperacety-lated sites in the chromatin will regulate excessive activation of pro-inflammatory genes in key inflammatory drivers of alveolar macrophages (AM) in COPD. Methods and findings Transcriptome analysis of AM from COPD patients indicated up-regulation of macrophage M1 type genes upon LPS stimulation. Pan-BET inhibitor JQ1 treatment attenuated expression of multiple genes, including pro-inflammatory cytokines and regulators of innate and adaptive immune cells. We demonstrated for the first time that JQ1 differentially modulated LPS-induced cytokine release from AM or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of COPD patients compared to PBMC of healthy controls. Using the BET regulated gene signature, we identified a subset of COPD patients, which we propose to benefit from BET inhibition. Conclusions This work demonstrates that the effects of pan-BET inhibition through JQ1 treatment of inflammatory cells differs between COPD patients and healthy controls, and the expression of BET protein regulated genes is altered in COPD. These findings provide evidence of histone hyperacetylation as a mechanism driving chronic inflammatory changes in COPD.
  • Saarimaki-Vire, Jonna; Balboa, Diego; Russell, Mark A.; Saarikettu, Juha; Kinnunen, Matias; Keskitalo, Salla; Malhi, Amrinder; Valensisi, Cristina; Andrus, Colin; Eurola, Solja; Grym, Heli; Ustinov, Jarkko; Wartiovaara, Kirmo; Hawkins, R. David; Silvennoinen, Olli; Varjosalo, Markku; Morgan, Noel G.; Otonkoski, Timo (2017)
    Activating germline mutations in STAT3 were recently identified as a cause of neonatal diabetes mellitus associated with beta-cell autoimmunity. We have investigated the effect of an activating mutation, STAT3(K392R,) on pancreatic development using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from a patient with neonatal diabetes and pancreatic hypoplasia. Early pancreatic endoderm differentiated similarly from STAT3(K392R) and healthy-control cells, but in later stages, NEUROG3 expressionwas upregulated prematurely in STAT3(K392R) cells together with insulin (INS) and glucagon (GCG). RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) showed robust NEUROG3 downstream targets upregulation. STAT3 mutation correction with CRISPR/Cas9 reversed completely the disease phenotype. STAT3(K392R) -activating properties were not explained fully by altered DNA-binding affinity or increased phosphorylation. Instead, reporter assays demonstrated NEUROG3 promoter activation by STAT3 in pancreatic cells. Furthermore, proteomic and immunocytochemical analyses revealed increased nuclear translocation of STAT3(K392R). Collectively, our results demonstrate that the STAT3(K392R) mutation causes premature endocrine differentiation through direct induction of NEUROG3 expression.
  • Korpela, Katri; Salonen, Anne; Saxen, Harri; Nikkonen, Anne; Peltola, Ville; Jaakkola, Tytti; de Vos, Willem; Kolho, Kaija-Leena (2020)
    BACKGROUND The effects of antibiotics on infant gut microbiota are unclear. We hypothesized that the use of common antibiotics results in long-term aberration in gut microbiota. METHODS Antibiotic-naive infants were prospectively recruited when hospitalized because of a respiratory syncytial virus infection. Composition of fecal microbiota was compared between those receiving antibiotics during follow-up (prescribed at clinicians' discretion because of complications such as otitis media) and those with no antibiotic exposure. Fecal sampling started on day 1, then continued at 2-day intervals during the hospital stay, and at 1, 3 and 6 months at home. RESULTS One hundred and sixty-three fecal samples from 40 patients (median age 2.3 months at baseline; 22 exposed to antibiotics) were available for microbiota analyses. A single course of amoxicillin or macrolide resulted in aberration of infant microbiota characterized by variation in the abundance of bifidobacteria, enterobacteria and clostridia, lasting for several months. Recovery from the antibiotics was associated with an increase in clostridia. Occasionally, antibiotic use resulted in microbiota profiles associated with inflammatory conditions. CONCLUSIONS Antibiotic use in infants modifies especially bifidobacterial levels. Further studies are warranted whether administration of bifidobacteria will provide health benefits by normalizing the microbiota in infants receiving antibiotics.
  • kConFab Investigators; HEBON Investigators; SWE BRCA Investigators; Muranen, Taru A.; Khan, Sofia; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Cunningham, Julie M.; Blomqvist, Carl; Nevanlinna, Heli (2020)
    Germline genetic variation has been suggested to influence the survival of breast cancer patients independently of tumor pathology. We have studied survival associations of genetic variants in two etiologically unique groups of breast cancer patients, the carriers of germline pathogenic variants in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. We found that rs57025206 was significantly associated with the overall survival, predicting higher mortality of BRCA1 carrier patients with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer, with a hazard ratio 4.37 (95% confidence interval 3.03-6.30, P=3.1x10(-9)). Multivariable analysis adjusted for tumor characteristics suggested that rs57025206 was an independent survival marker. In addition, our exploratory analyses suggest that the associations between genetic variants and breast cancer patient survival may depend on tumor biological subgroup and clinical patient characteristics.
  • Katajisto, Pekka; Doehla, Julia; Chaffer, Christine L.; Pentinmikko, Nalle; Marjanovic, Nemanja; Iqbal, Md Sharif; Zoncu, Roberto; Chen, Walter; Weinberg, Robert A.; Sabatini, David M. (2015)
    By dividing asymmetrically, stem cells can generate two daughter cells with distinct fates. However, evidence is limited in mammalian systems for the selective apportioning of subcellular contents between daughters. We followed the fates of old and young organelles during the division of human mammary stemlike cells and found that such cells apportion aged mitochondria asymmetrically between daughter cells. Daughter cells that received fewer old mitochondria maintained stem cell traits. Inhibition of mitochondrial fission disrupted both the age-dependent subcellular localization and segregation of mitochondria and caused loss of stem cell properties in the progeny cells. Hence, mechanisms exist for mammalian stemlike cells to asymmetrically sort aged and young mitochondria, and these are important for maintaining stemness properties.
  • Toledo, Miriam; Batista-Gonzalez, Ana; Merheb, Emilio; Aoun, Marie Louise; Tarabra, Elena; Feng, Daorong; Sarparanta, Jaakko; Merlo, Paola; Botre, Francesco; Schwartz, Gary J.; Pessin, Jeffrey E.; Singh, Rajat (2018)
    The circadian clock coordinates behavioral and circadian cues with availability and utilization of nutrients. Proteasomal degradation of clock repressors, such as cryptochrome (CRY) 1, maintains periodicity. Whether macroautophagy, a quality control pathway, degrades circadian proteins remains unknown. Here we show that circadian proteins BMAL1, CLOCK, REV-ERB alpha, and CRY1 are lysosomal targets, and that macroautophagy affects the circadian clock by selectively degrading CRY1. Autophagic degradation of CRY1, an inhibitor of gluconeogenesis, occurs in a diurnal window when rodents rely on gluconeogenesis, suggesting that CRY1 degradation is timeimprinted to maintenance of blood glucose. High-fat feeding accelerates autophagic CRY1 degradation and contributes to obesity-associated hyperglycemia. CRY1 contains several light chain 3 (LC3)-interacting region (LIR) motifs, which facilitate the interaction of cargo proteins with the autophagosome marker LC3. Using mutational analyses, we identified two distinct LIRs on CRY1 that exert circadian glycemic control by regulating CRY1 degradation, revealing LIRs as potential targets for controlling hyperglycemia.
  • Stass, Robert; Ilca, Serban L.; Huiskonen, Juha T. (2018)
    Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is widely used to determine high-resolution structures of symmetric virus capsids. The method holds promise for extending studies beyond purified capsids and their symmetric protein shells, The non-symmetric genome component has been addressed in dsRNA cypoviruses and ssRNA bacteriophages Q beta and MS2. The structure of human herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids has been determined within intact virions to resolve capsid-tegument interactions. Electron tomography under cryogenic conditions (cryo-ET), has allowed resolving an early membrane fusion intermediate of Rift Valley fever virus. Antibody-affinity based sample grids allow capturing of virions directly from cell cultures or even clinical samples. These and other emerging methods will support studies to address viral entry, assembly and neutralization processes at increasingly high resolutions and native conditions.
  • Filppu, Pauliina; Ramanathan, Jayendrakishore Tanjore; Granberg, Kirsi J.; Gucciardo, Erika; Haapasalo, Hannu; Lehti, Kaisa; Nykter, Matti; Le Joncour, Vadim; Laakkonen, Pirjo (2021)
    Glioma stem cells (GSCs) drive propagation and therapeutic resistance of glioblastomas, the most aggressive diffuse brain tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms that maintain the stemness and promote therapy resistance remain poorly understood. Here we report CD109/STAT3 axis as crucial for the maintenance of stemness and tumorigenicity of GSCs and as a mediator of chemoresistance. Mechanistically, CD109 physically interacts with glycoprotein 130 to promote activation of the IL-6/STAT3 pathway in GSCs. Genetic depletion of CD109 abolished the stemness and self-renewal of GSCs and impaired tumorigenicity. Loss of stemness was accompanied with a phenotypic shift of GSCs to more differentiated astrocytic-like cells. Importantly, genetic or pharmacologic targeting of CD109/STAT3 axis sensitized the GSCs to chemotherapy, suggesting that targeting CD109/STAT3 axis has potential to overcome therapy resistance in glioblastoma.
  • Laine, Anni; Nagelli, Srikar G.; Farrington, Caroline; Butt, Umar; Cvrljevic, Anna N.; Vainonen, Julia P.; Feringa, Femke M.; Gronroos, Tove J.; Gautam, Prson; Khan, Sofia; Sihto, Harri; Qiao, Xi; Pavic, Karolina; Connolly, Denise C.; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Elo, Laura L.; Maurer, Jochen; Wennerberg, Krister; Medema, Rene H.; Joensuu, Heikki; Peuhu, Emilia; de Visser, Karin; Narla, Goutham; Westermarck, Jukka (2021)
    Basal-like breast cancers (BLBC) are characterized by defects in homologous recombination (HR), deficient mitotic checkpoint, and high-proliferation activity. Here, we discover CIP2A as a candidate driver of BLBC. CIP2A was essential for DNA damage-induced initiation of mouse BLBC-like mammary tumors and for survival of HR-defective BLBC cells. CIP2A was dispensable for normal mammary gland development and for unperturbed mitosis, but selectively essential for mitotic progression of DNA damaged cells. A direct interaction between CIP2A and a DNA repair scaffold protein TopBP1 was identified, and CIP2A inhibition resulted in enhanced DNA damage-induced TopBP1 and RAD51 recruitment to chromatin in mammary epithelial cells. In addition to its role in tumor initiation, and survival of BRCA-deficient cells, CIP2A also drove proliferative MYC and E2F1 signaling in basal-like triple-negative breast cancer (BL-TNBC) cells. Clinically, high CIP2A expression was associated with poor patient prognosis in BL-TNBCs but not in other breast cancer subtypes. Small-molecule reactivators of PP2A (SMAP) inhibited CIP2A transcription, phenocopied the CIP2A-deficient DNA damage response (DDR), and inhibited growth of patient-derived BLBC xenograft. In summary, these results demonstrate that CIP2A directly interacts with TopBP1 and coordinates DNAdamage-induced mitotic checkpoint and proliferation, thereby driving BLBC initiation and progression. SMAPs could serve as a surrogate therapeutic strategy to inhibit the oncogenic activity of CIP2A in BLBCs. Significance: These results identify CIP2A as a nongenetic driver and therapeutic target in basal-like breast cancer that regulates DNA damage-induced G2-M checkpoint and proliferative signaling.
  • Merikanto, Ilona; Lahti, Jari; Kuula, Liisa; Heinonen, Kati; Räikkönen, Katri; Andersson, Sture; Strandberg, Timo; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina (2018)
    Objective: Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed new genetic variants behind self-reported individual circadian preference, a distinct biological trait that is fairly stable during adulthood. In this study we analyze whether these genetic variants associate with objectively measured sleep timing from childhood to adolescence, over a nine-year period, with self-reported circadian preference during late adolescence. Methods: The participants (N = 100, 61% girls) came from a community cohort from Finland born in 1998. Sleep midpoint was measured with actigraphy at 8, 12 and 17 years. Circadian preference was self-reported at the age of 17 years. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were extracted at 12 years of age from the Illumina OmniExpress Exome 1.2 bead array data. Weighted polygenic risk scores (PRSs) were calculated based on top SNPs from a recent GWAS for morningness-eveningness in an adult population. Results: The PRS for circadian preference towards morningness was associated with earlier sleep midpoint from childhood to adolescence. When the time points were analyzed separately, the association between genetic tendency towards morning preference and earlier sleep midpoint was strongest among the 17-year-olds. Furthermore, the shift towards later sleep rhythm from early to late adolescence was milder for those with a higher PRS for morning preference. PRS for morning preference was also associated with self-reported circadian preference towards morningness in late adolescence. Conclusion: Our results suggest that genetic variants found for circadian preference in adults are already associated with objective sleep timing during childhood and adolescence, and predict individual developmental sleep trajectories from childhood onwards. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Jalanka, Jonna; Cheng, Jing; Hiippala, Kaisa; Ritari, Jarmo; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Ruuska, Tarja; Kalliomaki, Marko; Satokari, Reetta (2020)
    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), are chronic debilitating disorders of unknown etiology. Over 200 genetic risk loci are associated with IBD, highlighting a key role for immunological and epithelial barrier functions. Environmental factors account for the growing incidence of IBD, and microbiota are considered as an important contributor. Microbiota dysbiosis can lead to a loss of tolerogenic immune effects and initiate or exacerbate inflammation. We aimed to study colonic mucosal microbiota and the expression of selected host genes in pediatric UC. We used high-throughput 16S rDNA sequencing to profile microbiota in colonic biopsies of pediatric UC patients (n= 26) and non-IBD controls (n= 27). The expression of 13 genes, including five for antimicrobial peptides, in parallel biopsies was assessed with qRT-PCR. The composition of microbiota between UC and non-IBD differed significantly (PCoA,p= 0.001). UC children had a decrease in Bacteroidetes and an increase in several family-level taxa including Peptostreptococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, which correlated negatively with the expression of antimicrobial peptides REG3G and DEFB1, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae correlated positively with the expression siderophore binding protein LCN2 and Betaproteobacteria negatively with DEFB4A expression. The results indicate that reciprocal interaction of epithelial microbiota and defense mechanisms play a role in UC.
  • Megta, Abhin Kumar; Pratap, Shivendra; Kant, Abhiruchi; Palva, Airi; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Krishnan, Vengadesan (2020)
    To successfully colonize a host or environment, certain genera and species of Gram-positive bacteria have evolved to utilize the so-called sortase-dependent pilus, a long multi-subunit and non-flagellar surface adhesin. One example of this is Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a gut-adapted probiotic strain that produces SpaCBA pili. These structures are covalent hetero-oligomers built from three types of pilin subunit, each with a specific location and function (i.e., backbone SpaA for length, tip SpaC for adhesion, and basal SpaB for anchoring). Functionally, the SpaCBA pilus exhibits a promiscuous affinity for components on intestinal surfaces (e.g., mucus, collagen, and epithelial cells), which is largely attributed to the SpaC subunit. Then again, the basal SpaB pilin, in addition to acting as the terminal subunit during pilus assembly, displays an out of character mucoadhesive function. To address the structural basis of this unusual dual functionality, we reveal the 2.39 A resolution crystal structure of SpaB. SpaB consists of one immunoglobulin-like CnaB domain and contains a putative intermolecular isopeptide bond-linking lysine and internal isopeptide bond-asparagine in an FPKN pilin motif within the C-terminal end. Remarkably, we found that a C-terminal stretch of positively charged lysine and arginine residues likely accounts for the atypical mucoadhesiveness of SpaB. Although harboring an autocatalytic triad of residues for a potential internal isopeptide interaction, the SpaB crystal structure lacked the visible electron density for intact bond formation, yet its presence was subsequently confirmed by mass spectral analysis. Finally, we propose a structural model that captures the exclusive basal positioning of SpaB in the SpaCBA pilus.
  • Saine, Sonja; Ovaskainen, Otso; Somervuo, Panu; Abrego, Nerea (2020)
    Inferring interspecific interactions indirectly from community data is of central interest in community ecology. Data on species communities can be surveyed using different methods, each of which may differ in the amount and type of species detected, and thus produce varying information on interaction networks. Since fruit bodies reflect only a fraction of the wood-inhabiting fungal diversity, there is an ongoing debate in fungal ecology on whether fruit body?based surveys are a valid method for studying fungal community dynamics compared to surveys based on DNA metabarcoding. In this paper, we focus on species-to-species associations and ask whether the associations inferred from data collected by fruit-body surveys reflect the ones found from data collected by DNA-based surveys. We estimate and compare the association networks resulting from different survey methods using a joint species distribution model. We recorded both raw and residual associations that respectively do not and do correct for the influence of the abiotic predictors when estimating the species-to-species associations. The analyses of the DNA data yielded a larger number of species-to-species associations than the analyses of the fruit body?based data as expected. Yet, we estimated unique associations also from the fruit-body data. Our results show that the directions of estimated residual associations were consistent between the data types, whereas the raw associations were much less consistent, highlighting the need to account for the influence of relevant environmental covariates when estimating association networks. We conclude that even though DNA-based survey methods are more informative about the total number of interacting species, fruit-body surveys are also an adequate method for inferring association networks in wood-inhabiting fungi. Since the DNA and fruit-body data carry on complementary information on fungal communities, the most comprehensive insights are obtained by combining the two survey methods. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
  • Ohukainen, Pauli; Kuusisto, Sanna; Kettunen, Johannes; Perola, Markus; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Makinen, Ville-Petteri; Ala-Korpela, Mika (2020)
    Background and aims: Population subgrouping has been suggested as means to improve coronary heart disease (CHD) risk assessment. We explored here how unsupervised data-driven metabolic subgrouping, based on comprehensive lipoprotein subclass data, would work in large-scale population cohorts. Methods: We applied a self-organizing map (SOM) artificial intelligence methodology to define subgroups based on detailed lipoprotein profiles in a population-based cohort (n = 5789) and utilised the trained SOM in an independent cohort (n = 7607). We identified four SOM-based subgroups of individuals with distinct lipoprotein profiles and CHD risk and compared those to univariate subgrouping by apolipoprotein B quartiles. Results: The SOM-based subgroup with highest concentrations for non-HDL measures had the highest, and the subgroup with lowest concentrations, the lowest risk for CHD. However, apolipoprotein B quartiles produced better resolution of risk than the SOM-based subgroups and also striking dose-response behaviour. Conclusions: These results suggest that the majority of lipoprotein-mediated CHD risk is explained by apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein particles. Therefore, even advanced multivariate subgrouping, with comprehensive data on lipoprotein metabolism, may not advance CHD risk assessment
  • Katayama, Shintaro; Panelius, Jaana; Koskenmies, Sari; Skoog, Tiina; Mahonen, Katariina; Kisand, Kai; Bondet, Vincent; Duffy, Darragh; Krjutskov, Kaarel; Kere, Juha; Ranki, Annamari (2019)
  • Feng, Shaohong; Stiller, Josefin; Deng, Yuan; Armstrong, Joel; Fang, Qi; Reeve, Andrew Hart; Xie, Duo; Chen, Guangji; Guo, Chunxue; Faircloth, Brant C.; Petersen, Bent; Wang, Zongji; Zhou, Qi; Diekhans, Mark; Chen, Wanjun; Andreu-Sanchez, Sergio; Margaryan, Ashot; Howard, Jason Travis; Parent, Carole; Pacheco, George; Sinding, Mikkel-Holger S.; Puetz, Lara; Cavill, Emily; Ribeiro, Angela M.; Eckhart, Leopold; Fjeldsa, Jon; Hosner, Peter A.; Brumfield, Robb T.; Christidis, Les; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Tietze, Dieter Thomas; Robertson, Bruce C.; Song, Gang; Borgia, Gerald; Claramunt, Santiago; Lovette, Irby J.; Cowen, Saul J.; Njoroge, Peter; Dumbacher, John Philip; Ryder, Oliver A.; Fuchs, Jerome; Bunce, Michael; Burt, David W.; Cracraft, Joel; Meng, Guanliang; Hackett, Shannon J.; Ryan, Peter G.; Jønsson, Knud Andreas; Jamieson, Ian G.; da Fonseca, Rute R.; Braun, Edward L.; Houde, Peter; Mirarab, Siavash; Suh, Alexander; Hansson, Bengt; Ponnikas, Suvi; Sigeman, Hanna; Stervander, Martin; Frandsen, Paul B.; van der Zwan, Henriette; van der Sluis, Rencia; Visser, Carina; Balakrishnan, Christopher N.; Clark, Andrew G.; Fitzpatrick, John W.; Bowman, Reed; Chen, Nancy; Cloutier, Alison; Sackton, Timothy B.; Edwards, Scott V.; Foote, Dustin J.; Shakya, Subir B.; Sheldon, Frederick H.; Vignal, Alain; Soares, Andre E. R.; Shapiro, Beth; Gonzalez-Solis, Jacob; Ferrer-Obiol, Joan; Rozas, Julio; Riutort, Marta; Tigano, Anna; Friesen, Vicki; Dalen, Love; Urrutia, Araxi O.; Szekely, Tamas; Liu, Yang; Campana, Michael G.; Corvelo, Andre; Fleischer, Robert C.; Rutherford, Kim M.; Gemmell, Neil J.; Dussex, Nicolas; Mouritsen, Henrik; Thiele, Nadine; Delmore, Kira; Liedvogel, Miriam; Franke, Andre; Hoeppner, Marc P.; Krone, Oliver; Fudickar, Adam M.; Mila, Borja; Ketterson, Ellen D.; Fidler, Andrew Eric; Friis, Guillermo; Parody-Merino, Angela M.; Battley, Phil F.; Cox, Murray P.; Lima, Nicholas Costa Barroso; Prosdocimi, Francisco; Parchman, Thomas Lee; Schlinger, Barney A.; Loiselle, Bette A.; Blake, John G.; Lim, Haw Chuan; Day, Lainy B.; Fuxjager, Matthew J.; Baldwin, Maude W.; Braun, Michael J.; Wirthlin, Morgan; Dikow, Rebecca B.; Ryder, T. Brandt; Camenisch, Glauco; Keller, Lukas F.; DaCosta, Jeffrey M.; Hauber, Mark E.; Louder, Matthew I. M.; Witt, Christopher C.; McGuire, Jimmy A.; Mudge, Joann; Megna, Libby C.; Carling, Matthew D.; Wang, Biao; Taylor, Scott A.; Del-Rio, Glaucia; Aleixo, Alexandre; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Mello, Claudio V.; Weir, Jason T.; Haussler, David; Li, Qiye; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Lei, Fumin; Rahbek, Carsten; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Graves, Gary R.; Jarvis, Erich D.; Paten, Benedict; Zhang, Guojie (2020)
    Whole-genome sequencing projects are increasingly populating the tree of life and characterizing biodiversity(1-4). Sparse taxon sampling has previously been proposed to confound phylogenetic inference(5), and captures only a fraction of the genomic diversity. Here we report a substantial step towards the dense representation of avian phylogenetic and molecular diversity, by analysing 363 genomes from 92.4% of bird families-including 267 newly sequenced genomes produced for phase II of the Bird 10,000 Genomes (B10K) Project. We use this comparative genome dataset in combination with a pipeline that leverages a reference-free whole-genome alignment to identify orthologous regions in greater numbers than has previously been possible and to recognize genomic novelties in particular bird lineages. The densely sampled alignment provides a single-base-pair map of selection, has more than doubled the fraction of bases that are confidently predicted to be under conservation and reveals extensive patterns of weak selection in predominantly non-coding DNA. Our results demonstrate that increasing the diversity of genomes used in comparative studies can reveal more shared and lineage-specific variation, and improve the investigation of genomic characteristics. We anticipate that this genomic resource will offer new perspectives on evolutionary processes in cross-species comparative analyses and assist in efforts to conserve species. A dataset of the genomes of 363 species from the Bird 10,000 Genomes Project shows increased power to detect shared and lineage-specific variation, demonstrating the importance of phylogenetically diverse taxon sampling in whole-genome sequencing.