Browsing by Subject "RHINOVIRUS"

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  • Luukkainen, Annika; Puan, Kia Joo; Yusof, Nurhashikin; Lee, Bernett; Tan, Kai Sen; Liu, Jing; Yan, Yan; Toppila-Salmi, Sanna; Renkonen, Risto; Chow, Vincent T.; Rotzschke, Olaf; Wang, De Yun (2018)
    Background: We established an in vitro co-culture model involving H3N2-infection of human nasal epithelium with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to investigate their cross-talk during early H3N2 infection. Methods: Nasal epithelium was differentiated from human nasal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and cultured wtih fresh human PBMC. PBMC and supernatants were harvested after 24 and 48 h of co-culture with H3N2-infected nasal epithelium. We used flow cytometry and Luminex to characterize PBMC subpopulations, their activation and secretion of cytokine and chemokines. Results: H3N2 infection of the nasal epithelium associated with significant increase in interferons (IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-29), pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, BDNF, IL-3) and viral-associated chemokines (IP-10, MCP-3, I-TAC, MIG), detectable already after 24 h. This translates into rapid activation of monocytes, NK-cells and innate T-cells (MAIT and gamma delta T cells), evident with CD38+ and/or CD69+ upregulation. Conclusions: This system may contribute to in vitro mechanistic immunological studies bridging systemic models and possibly enable the development of targeted immunomodulatory therapies.
  • Hayes, A.; Nguyen, D.; Andersson, M.; Anton, A.; Bailly, J-L; Beard, S.; Benschop, K. S. M.; Berginc, N.; Blomqvist, S.; Cunningham, E.; Davis, D.; Dembinski, J. L.; Diedrich, S.; Dudman, S. G.; Dyrdak, R.; Eltringham, G. J. A.; Gonzales-Goggia, S.; Gunson, R.; Howson-Wells, H. C.; Jääskeläinen, A. J.; Lopez-Labrador, F. X.; Maier, M.; Majumdar, M.; Midgley, S.; Mirand, A.; Morley, U.; Nordbo, S. A.; Oikarinen, S.; Osman, H.; Papa, A.; Pellegrinelli, L.; Piralla, A.; Rabella, N.; Richter, J.; Smith, M.; Strand, A. Söderlund; Templeton, K.; Vipond, B.; Vuorinen, T.; Williams, C.; Wollants, E.; Zakikhany, K.; Fischer, T. K.; Harvala, H.; Simmonds, P. (2020)
    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection has become the gold standard for diagnosis and typing of enterovirus (EV) and human parechovirus (HPeV) infections. Its effectiveness depends critically on using the appropriate sample types and high assay sensitivity as viral loads in cerebrospinal fluid samples from meningitis and sepsis clinical presentation can be extremely low. This study evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of currently used commercial and in-house diagnostic and typing assays. Accurately quantified RNA transcript controls were distributed to 27 diagnostic and 12 reference laboratories in 17 European countries for blinded testing. Transcripts represented the four human EV species (EV-A71, echovirus 30, coxsackie A virus 21, and EV-D68), HPeV3, and specificity controls. Reported results from 48 in-house and 15 commercial assays showed 98% detection frequencies of high copy (1000 RNA copies/5 mu L) transcripts. In-house assays showed significantly greater detection frequencies of the low copy (10 copies/5 mu L) EV and HPeV transcripts (81% and 86%, respectively) compared with commercial assays (56%, 50%; P = 7 x 10(-5)). EV-specific PCRs showed low cross-reactivity with human rhinovirus C (3 of 42 tests) and infrequent positivity in the negative control (2 of 63 tests). Most or all high copy EV and HPeV controls were successfully typed (88%, 100%) by reference laboratories, but showed reduced effectiveness for low copy controls (41%, 67%). Stabilized RNA transcripts provide an effective, logistically simple and inexpensive reagent for evaluation of diagnostic assay performance. The study provides reassurance of the performance of the many in-house assay formats used across Europe. However, it identified often substantially reduced sensitivities of commercial assays often used as point-of-care tests.
  • Saarinen, Niila V. V.; Lehtonen, Jussi; Veijola, Riitta; Lempainen, Johanna; Knip, Mikael; Hyöty, Heikki; Laitinen, Olli H.; Hytönen, Vesa P. (2020)
    Immunological assays detecting antibodies against enteroviruses typically use a single enterovirus serotype as antigen. This limits the ability of such assays to detect antibodies against different enterovirus types and to detect possible type-specific variation in antibody responses. We set out to develop a multiplexed assay for simultaneous detection of antibodies against multiple enterovirus and rhinovirus types encompassing all human infecting species. Seven recombinant VP1 proteins from enteroviruses EV-A to EV-D and rhinoviruses RV-A to RV-C species were produced. Using Meso Scale Diagnostics U-PLEX platform we were able to study antibody reactions against these proteins as well as non-structural enterovirus proteins in a single well with 140 human serum samples. Adults had on average 33-fold stronger antibody responses to these antigens (p<10(-11)) compared to children, but children had less cross-reactivity between different enterovirus types. The results suggest that this new high-throughput assay offers clear benefits in the evaluation of humoral enterovirus immunity in children, giving more exact information than assays that are based on a single enterovirus type as antigen.
  • Aronen, Matti; Viikari, Laura; Kohonen, Ia; Vuorinen, Tytti; Hämeenaho, Mira; Wuorela, Maarit; Sadeghi, Mohammadreza; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Viitanen, Matti; Jartti, Tuomas (2019)
    Background: In children suffering from severe lower airway illnesses, respiratory virus detection has given good prognostic information, but such reports in the elderly are scarce. Therefore, our aim was to study whether the detection of nasopharyngeal viral pathogens and conventional inflammatory markers in the frail elderly correlate to the presence, signs and symptoms or prognosis of radiographically-verified pneumonia. Methods: Consecutive episodes of hospital care of patients 65years and older with respiratory symptoms (N = 382) were prospectively studied as a cohort. Standard clinical questionnaire was filled by the study physician. Laboratory analyses included PCR diagnostics of nasopharyngeal swab samples for 14 respiratory viruses, C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell count (WBC). Chest radiographs were systematically analysed by a study radiologist. The length of hospital stay, hospital revisit and death at ward were used as clinical endpoints. Results: Median age of the patients was 83years (range 76-90). Pneumonia was diagnosed in 112/382 (29%) of the studied episodes. One or more respiratory viruses were detected in 141/382 (37%) episodes and in 34/112 (30%) episodes also diagnosed with pneumonia. Pneumonia was associated with a WBC over 15 x 10(9)/L (P = .006) and a CRP value over 80 mg/l (P <.05). A virus was detected in 30% of pneumonia episodes and in 40% of non-pneumonia episodes, but this difference was not significant (P = 0.09). The presence of a respiratory virus was associated with fewer revisits to the hospital (P <.05), whereas a CRP value over 100 mg/l was associated with death during hospital stay (P <.05). Respiratory virus detections did not correlate to WBC or CRP values, signs and symptoms or prognosis of radiographically-verified pneumonia episodes. Conclusion: Among the elderly with respiratory symptoms, respiratory virus detection was not associated with an increased risk of pneumonia or with a more severe clinical course of the illness. CRP and WBC remain important indicators of pneumonia, and according to our findings, pneumonia should be treated as a bacterial disease regardless of the virus findings. Our data does not support routine virus diagnostics for the elderly patients with pneumonia outside the epidemic seasons.