Browsing by Subject "RISK-FACTORS"

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  • Sartelli, Massimo; Di Bella, Stefano; McFarland, Lynne V.; Khanna, Sahil; Furuya-Kanamori, Luis; Abuzeid, Nadir; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M.; Ansaloni, Luca; Augustin, Goran; Bala, Miklosh; Ben-Ishay, Offir; Biffl, Walter L.; Brecher, Stephen M.; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrian; Cainzos, Miguel A.; Chan, Shirley; Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill R.; Clanton, Jesse; Coccolini, Federico; Cocuz, Maria E.; Coimbra, Raul; Cortese, Francesco; Cui, Yunfeng; Czepiel, Jacek; Demetrashvili, Zaza; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Di Saverio, Salomone; Dumitru, Irina M.; Eckmann, Christian; Eiland, Edward H.; Forrester, Joseph D.; Fraga, Gustavo P.; Frossard, Jean L.; Fry, Donald E.; Galeiras, Rita; Ghnnam, Wagih; Gomes, Carlos A.; Griffiths, Ewen A.; Guirao, Xavier; Ahmed, Mohamed H.; Herzog, Torsten; Kim, Jae Il; Iqbal, Tariq; Isik, Arda; Itani, Kamal M. F.; Labricciosa, Francesco M.; Lee, Yeong Y.; Juang, Paul; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Kim, Peter K.; Kluger, Yoram; Leppäniemi, Ari; Lohsiriwat, Varut; Machain, Gustavo M.; Marwah, Sanjay; Mazuski, John E.; Metan, Gokhan; Moore, Ernest E.; Moore, Frederick A.; Ordonez, Carlos A.; Pagani, Leonardo; Petrosillo, Nicola; Portela, Francisco; Rasa, Kemal; Rems, Miran; Sakakushev, Boris E.; Segovia-Lohse, Helmut; Sganga, Gabriele; Shelat, Vishal G.; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Tattevin, Pierre; Trana, Cristian; Urbanek, Libor; Ulrych, Jan; Viale, Pierluigi; Baiocchi, Gian L.; Catena, Fausto (2019)
    In the last three decades, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased in incidence and severity in many countries worldwide. The increase in CDI incidence has been particularly apparent among surgical patients. Therefore, prevention of CDI and optimization of management in the surgical patient are paramount. An international multidisciplinary panel of experts from the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) updated its guidelines for management of CDI in surgical patients according to the most recent available literature. The update includes recent changes introduced in the management of this infection.
  • Prokopenko, Inga; Poon, Wenny; Maegi, Reedik; Prasad, Rashmi B.; Salehi, S. Albert; Almgren, Peter; Osmark, Peter; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Wierup, Nils; Fall, Tove; Stancakova, Alena; Barker, Adam; Lagou, Vasiliki; Osmond, Clive; Xie, Weijia; Lahti, Jari; Jackson, Anne U.; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Liu, Jie; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Blomstedt, Paul A.; Fadista, Joao; Alkayyali, Sami; Dayeh, Tasnim; Ahlqvist, Emma; Taneera, Jalal; Lecoeur, Cecile; Kumar, Ashish; Hansson, Ola; Hansson, Karin; Voight, Benjamin F.; Kang, Hyun Min; Levy-Marchal, Claire; Vatin, Vincent; Palotie, Aarno; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Mari, Andrea; Weedon, Michael N.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Ong, Ken K.; Nilsson, Peter; Isomaa, Bo; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Stumvoll, Michael; Widen, Elisabeth; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Tonjes, Anke; Rauramaa, Rainer; Kuusisto, Johanna; Frayling, Timothy M.; Froguel, Philippe; Walker, Mark; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ling, Charlotte; Kovacs, Peter; Ingelsson, Erik; McCarthy, Mark I.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Silver, Kristi D.; Laakso, Markku; Groop, Leif; Lyssenko, Valeriya (2014)
  • Blain, H.; Masud, T.; Dargent-Molina, P.; Martin, F. C.; Rosendahl, E.; van der Velde, N.; Bousquet, J.; Benetos, A.; Cooper, C.; Kanis, J. A.; Reginster, J. Y.; Rizzoli, R.; Cortet, B.; Barbagallo, M.; Dreinhoefer, K.; Vellas, B.; Maggi, S.; Strandberg, T.; Alvarez, M. N.; Annweiler, C.; Bernard, P. -L.; Beswetherick, N.; Bischoff-Ferrari, H. A.; Bloch, F.; Boddaert, J.; Bonnefoy, M.; Bousson, V.; Bourdel-Marchasson, I.; Capisizu, A.; Che, H.; Clara, J. G.; Combe, B.; Delignieres, D.; Eklund, P.; Emmelot-Vonk, M.; Freiberger, E.; Gauvain, J. -B.; Goswami, N.; Guldemond, N.; Herrero, A. C.; Joel, M. -E.; Jonsdottir, A. B.; Kemoun, G.; Kiss, I.; Kolk, H.; Kowalski, M. L.; Krajcik, S.; Kutsal, Y. G.; Lauretani, F.; Macijauskiene, J.; Int Assoc Gerontology Geriatrics; European Union Medical Specialists; Fragility Fracture Network FFN; EUGMS Falls Fracture Interest Grp; European Soc Clinical Economic; Osteoporosis Research Information; International Osteoporosis (2016)
    Prevention of fragility fractures in older people has become a public health priority, although the most appropriate and cost-effective strategy remains unclear. In the present statement, the Interest group on falls and fracture prevention of the European union geriatric medicine society (EUGMS), in collaboration with the International association of gerontology and geriatrics for the European region (IAGG-ER), the European union of medical specialists (EUMS), the Fragility fracture network (FFN), the International osteoporosis foundation (IOF) - European society for clinical and economic aspects of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis (ECCEO), outlines its views on the main points in the current debate in relation to the primary and secondary prevention of falls, the diagnosis and treatment of bone fragility, and the place of combined falls and fracture liaison services for fracture prevention in older people. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.
  • Blain, H.; Masud, T.; Dargent-Molina, P.; Martin, F. C.; Rosendahl, E.; van der Velde, N.; Bousquet, J.; Benetos, A.; Cooper, C.; Kanis, J. A.; Reginster, J. Y.; Rizzoli, R.; Cortet, B.; Barbagallo, M.; Dreinhoefer, K. E.; Vellas, B.; Maggi, S.; Strandberg, T.; EUGMS Falls & Fracture Interest Gr; IAGG-ER; EUMS; FFN; European Soc Clinical & Econ Aspec; IOF (2016)
    Prevention of fragility fractures in older people has become a public health priority, although the most appropriate and cost-effective strategy remains unclear. In the present statement, the Interest Group on Falls and Fracture Prevention of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, in collaboration with the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics for the European Region, the European Union of Medical Specialists, and the International Osteoporosis Foundation-European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, outlines its views on the main points in the current debate in relation to the primary and secondary prevention of falls, the diagnosis and treatment of bone fragility, and the place of combined falls and fracture liaison services for fracture prevention in older people.
  • Blain, H.; Masud, T.; Dargent-Molina, P.; Martin, F. C.; Rosendahl, E.; van der Velde, N.; Bousquet, J.; Benetos, A.; Cooper, C.; Kanis, J. A.; Reginster, J. Y.; Rizzoli, R.; Cortet, B.; Barbagallo, M.; Dreinhofer, K. E.; Vellas, B.; Maggi, S.; Strandberg, T.; Eugms Falls Fracture Interest Grp; Int Assoc Gerontology Geriatri; European Union Med Specialists EUM; Fragility Fracture Network FFN; European Soc Clinical Econ Aspects; Int Osteoporosis Fdn IOF (2016)
    Prevention of fragility fractures in older people has become a public health priority, although the most appropriate and cost-effective strategy remains unclear. In the present statement, the Interest Group on Falls and Fracture Prevention of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS), in collaboration with the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics for the European Region (IAGG-ER), the European Union of Medical Specialists (EUMS), the International Osteoporosis Foundation - European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, outlines its views on the main points in the current debate in relation to the primary and secondary prevention of falls, the diagnosis and treatment of bone fragility, and the place of combined falls and fracture liaison services for fracture prevention in older people.
  • Suomalainen, L.; Haravuori, H.; Berg, N.; Kiviruusu, O.; Marttunen, M. (2011)
    Background: In November 2007, a student shot eight people and himself at Jokela High School, Finland. This study aims to evaluate the long-term effects of exposure to a school shooting among adolescents. Method: Associations between psychological outcomes and background factors were analysed and compared with "comparison students" four months after the incident. A questionnaire including Impact of Event Scale (IES) and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-36) was used. Results: Half of the females and a third of the males suffered from posttraumatic distress. High level of posttraumatic distress (IES >= 35), predicting PTSD, was observed in 27% of the females and 7% of the males. The odds ratio was 6.4 (95% confidence interval 3.5-10.5) for having high levels of posttraumatic distress. Severe or extreme exposure and female gender were found to increase the risk. Forty-two percent of the females and 16% of the males had psychiatric disturbance (GHQ >= 9). Severe or extreme exposure, older age and female gender increased the risk. Perceived support from family and friends was found to be protective. Conclusions: The observed risk and protective factors were similar to earlier studies. Follow-up will be essential in identifying factors predicting persisting trauma-related symptoms in adolescence. (C) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.
  • Prokic, Ivana; Lahousse, Lies; de Vries, Maaike; Liu, Jun; Kalaoja, Marita; Vonk, Judith M.; van der Plaat, Diana A.; van Diemen, Cleo C.; van der Spek, Ashley; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Fu, Jingyuan; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; Havulinna, Aki S.; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Lind, Lars; Arnlov, Johan; Stricker, Bruno H. C.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Boezen, H. Marike; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Amin, Najaf (2020)
    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common lung disorder characterized by persistent and progressive airflow limitation as well as systemic changes. Metabolic changes in blood may help detect COPD in an earlier stage and predict prognosis. Methods We conducted a comprehensive study of circulating metabolites, measured by proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, in relation with COPD and lung function. The discovery sample consisted of 5557 individuals from two large population-based studies in the Netherlands, the Rotterdam Study and the Erasmus Rucphen Family study. Significant findings were replicated in 12,205 individuals from the Lifelines-DEEP study, FINRISK and the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) studies. For replicated metabolites further investigation of causality was performed, utilizing genetics in the Mendelian randomization approach. Results There were 602 cases of COPD and 4955 controls used in the discovery meta-analysis. Our logistic regression results showed that higher levels of plasma Glycoprotein acetyls (GlycA) are significantly associated with COPD (OR = 1.16,P = 5.6 x 10(- 4)in the discovery and OR = 1.30,P = 1.8 x 10(- 6)in the replication sample). A bi-directional two-sample Mendelian randomization analysis suggested that circulating blood GlycA is not causally related to COPD, but that COPD causally increases GlycA levels. Using the prospective data of the same sample of Rotterdam Study in Cox-regression, we show that the circulating GlycA level is a predictive biomarker of COPD incidence (HR = 1.99, 95%CI 1.52-2.60, comparing those in the highest and lowest quartile of GlycA) but is not significantly associated with mortality in COPD patients (HR = 1.07, 95%CI 0.94-1.20). Conclusions Our study shows that circulating blood GlycA is a biomarker of early COPD pathology.
  • Surrogate Markers Micro-Macro-Vasc (2018)
    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is the most common eye complication in patients with diabetes. The purpose of this study is to identify genetic factors contributing to severe diabetic retinopathy. Methods Results A genome-wide association approach was applied. In the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research in Tayside Scotland (GoDARTS) datasets, cases of severe diabetic retinopathy were defined as type 2 diabetic patients who were ever graded as having severe background retinopathy (Level R3) or proliferative retinopathy (Level R4) in at least one eye according to the Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy Grading Scheme or who were once treated by laser photocoagulation. Controls were diabetic individuals whose longitudinal retinopathy screening records were either normal (Level R0) or only with mild background retinopathy (Level R1) in both eyes. Significant Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) were taken forward for meta-analysis using multiple Caucasian cohorts. Five hundred and sixty cases of type 2 diabetes with severe diabetic retinopathy and 4,106 controls were identified in the GoDARTS cohort. We revealed that rs3913535 in the NADPH Oxidase 4 (NOX4) gene reached a p value of 4.05 x 10(-9). Two nearby SNPs, rs10765219 and rs11018670 also showed promising p values (p values = 7.41 x 10(-8) and 1.23 x 10(-8), respectively). In the meta-analysis using multiple Caucasian cohorts (excluding GoDARTS), rs10765219 and rs11018670 showed associations for diabetic retinopathy (p = 0.003 and 0.007, respectively), while the p value of rs3913535 was not significant (p = 0.429). Conclusion This genome-wide association study of severe diabetic retinopathy suggests new evidence for the involvement of the NOX4 gene.
  • Int Headache Genetics Consortium; 23andMe Res Team; Guo, Yanjun; Rist, Pamela M.; Daghlas, Iyas; Giulianini, Franco; Kurth, Tobias; Chasman, Daniel; Artto, Ville; Färkkilä, Markus; Kallela, Mikko; Pärn, Kalle; Muona, Mikko; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Kaunisto, Mari; Hämäläinen, Eija; Kaprio, Jaakko; Palta, Priit; Wessman, Maija; Palotie, Aarno; Vepsäläinen, Salli; Wedenoja, Juho; Eriksson, Johan G.; Heikkilä, Kauko (2020)
    Blood pressure (BP) was inconsistently associated with migraine and the mechanisms of BP-lowering medications in migraine prophylaxis are unknown. Leveraging large-scale summary statistics for migraine (N-cases/N-controls = 59,674/316,078) and BP (N = 757,601), we find positive genetic correlations of migraine with diastolic BP (DBP, r(g) = 0.11, P = 3.56 x 10(-06)) and systolic BP (SBP, r(g) = 0.06, P = 0.01), but not pulse pressure (PP, r(g) = -0.01, P = 0.75). Cross-trait meta-analysis reveals 14 shared loci (P
  • Mendes-Santo, Cristina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Santana, Rui; Andersson, Gerhard (2019)
    Background: Internet-delivered interventions can provide remarkable opportunities in addressing breast cancer survivors' unmet support care needs, as they present an effective strategy to improve care coordination and provide access to efficacious, cost-efficient and convenient survivorship care. Nevertheless, research focusing on improving survivors' psychosocial needs using internet-based tools is scarce and its practical implementation is limited. Objectives: To study the acceptability, feasibility, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of iNNOVBC, a 10 weeks guided internet-delivered individually-tailored Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)-influenced cognitive behavioural (CBT) intervention developed to improve mild to moderate anxiety and depression in Breast cancer survivors when compared to treatment as usual (TAU) in a waiting list control group (WLC). Methods: A two-arm, parallel, open label, multicentre, waiting list randomized controlled trial will be conducted to investigate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of INNOVBC. The primary outcomes in this research will be anxiety and depression. Secondary outcomes will include psychological flexibility, fatigue, insomnia, sexual dysfunction and Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). Ethical approval: This study has been reviewed and approved by Comisstio Nacional de Protectio de Dados; Instituto Portuguis de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil; Unidade Local de Satide de Matosinhos, EPE; Centro Hospitalar de Sao Joao and Ordem dos Psicologos ethical committees. Expected results: It is anticipated that iNNOVBC will show to be an efficacious and cost-effective program in improving the outcomes of interest in this study, as opposed to a WLC under TAU. The results of this research will be published in accordance with CONSORT-EHEALTH guidelines. Conclusions: This study will inform on the acceptability, feasibility, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of iNNOVBC, in improving psychosocial outcomes in breast cancer survivors when compared to TAU in a WLC. Its conclusions will contribute to understand the idiosyncrasies of designing and implementing internet-delivered interventions in breast cancer survivors.
  • Roininen, Saara; Laine, Outi; Kauppila, Marjut; Vesanen, Marko; Ramet, Maria; Sinisalo, Marjatta; Jantunen, Esa; Saily, Marjaana; Räty, Riikka; Elonen, Erkki; Wartiovaara-Kautto, Ulla (2017)
    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) covers up to a third of all venous thromboses (VTs) detected in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). It usually hampers patients' lives and may also endanger efficient leukemia treatment. Although many factors have been suggested to account for an elevated risk of VTs in patients with ALL, there still is a lack of studies focusing on CVTs and especially in the setting of adult ALL patients. We studied in our retrospective population-based cohort the occurrence, characteristics, as well as risk factors for VTs in 186 consecutively diagnosed Finnish adult ALL patients treated with a national pediatric-inspired treatment protocol ALL2000. In the risk factor analyses for VTs we found a distinction of the characteristics of the patients acquiring CVT from those with other kinds of VTs or without thrombosis. In contrast to previous studies we were also able to compare the effects of asparaginase in relation to CVT occurrence. Notably, more than half of the CVTs were diagnosed prior the administration of asparaginase which accentuates the role of other risk factors on the pathophysiology of CVT compared to truncal or central venous line (CVL) VTs in adult ALL patients.
  • Mikkola, Ilona; Hagnäs, Maria; Hartsenko, Jelena; Kaila, Minna; Winell, Klas (2020)
    Aims To investigate whether the use of a personalized care plan is associated with clinical outcomes of type 2 diabetes (T2D) treatment in real-world. Methods Quality of treatment was assessed using data from a yearly sample of patients with T2D visiting primary care health centres in 2012–2016. Patients were divided into three groups: 1) patient has a copy of their personalized care plan, 2) care plan exists in the patient record only or 3) patient has no care plan. Data on smoking, laboratory tests, systolic blood pressure (sBP) and statin use were collected. We compared the outcomes between the three groups in terms of proportions of patients achieving the clinical targets recommended by international guidelines. Results Evaluable data were available for 10,403 patients. Of these, 1,711 (16%) had a copy of their personalized care plan, and 3,623 (35%) had no care plan. Those who had a copy of their care plan were significantly more likely than those without to achieve the sBP target (odds ratio [OR] 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29–1.51, p
  • Nordgreen, Janicke; Edwards, Sandra A.; Boyle, Laura Ann; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth; Veit, Christina; Sayyari, Amin; Marin, Daniela E.; Dimitrov, Ivan; Janczak, Andrew M.; Valros, Anna (2020)
    Sickness can change our mood for the worse, leaving us sad, lethargic, grumpy and less socially inclined. This mood change is part of a set of behavioral symptoms called sickness behavior and has features in common with core symptoms of depression. Therefore, the physiological changes induced by immune activation, for example following infection, are in the spotlight for explaining mechanisms behind mental health challenges such as depression. While humans may take a day off and isolate themselves until they feel better, farm animals housed in groups have only limited possibilities for social withdrawal. We suggest that immune activation could be a major factor influencing social interactions in pigs, with outbreaks of damaging behavior such as tail biting as a possible result. The hypothesis presented here is that the effects of several known risk factors for tail biting are mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines, proteins produced by the immune system, and their effect on neurotransmitter systems. We describe the background for and implications of this hypothesis.
  • Sever, Mehmet Sukru; Jager, Kitty J.; Vanholder, Raymond; Stengel, Benedicte; Harambat, Jerome; Finne, Patrik; Tesar, Vladimir; Barbullushi, Myftar; Bumblyte, Inga A.; Zakharova, Elena; Spasovski, Goce; Resic, Halima; Wiecek, Andrzej; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Bruchfeld, Annette; Cozzolino, Mario; Goumenos, Dimitris; Soler, Maria Jose; Rychlik, Ivan; Stevens, Kate; Wanner, Christoph; Zoccali, Carmine; Massy, Ziad A. (2021)
    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem because of its high prevalence, associated complications and high treatment costs. Several aspects of CKD differ significantly in the Eastern European nephrology community compared with Western Europe because of different geographic, socio-economic, infrastructure, cultural and educational features. The two most frequent aetiologies of CKD, DM and hypertension, and many other predisposing factors, are more frequent in the Eastern region, resulting in more prevalent CKD Stages 3-5. Interventions may minimize the potential drawbacks of the high prevalence of CKD in Eastern Europe, which include several options at various stages of the disease, such as raising public, medical personnel and healthcare authorities awareness; early detection by screening high-risk populations; preventing progression and CKD-related complications by training health professionals and patients; promoting transplantation or home dialysis as the preferred modality; disseminating and implementing guidelines and guided therapy and encouraging/supporting country-specific observational research as well as international collaborative projects. Specific ways to significantly impact CKD-related problems in every region of Europe through education, science and networking are collaboration with non-nephrology European societies who have a common interest in CKD and its associated complications, representation through an advisory role within nephrology via national nephrology societies, contributing to the training of local nephrologists and stimulating patient-oriented research. The latter is mandatory to identify country-specific kidney disease-related priorities. Active involvement of patients in this research via collaboration with the European Kidney Patient Federation or national patient federations is imperative to ensure that projects reflect specific patient needs.
  • Canaani, Jonathan; Savani, Bipin N.; Labopin, Myriam; Michallet, Mauricette; Craddock, Charles; Socie, Gerard; Volin, Liisa; Maertens, Johan A.; Crawley, Charles; Blaise, Didier; Ljungman, Per T.; Cornelissen, Jan; Russell, Nigel; Baron, Frederic; Gorin, Norbert; Esteve, Jordi; Ciceri, Fabio; Schmid, Christoph; Giebel, Sebastian; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon (2017)
    ABO incompatibility is commonly observed in stem cell transplantation and its impact in this setting has been extensively investigated. HLA-mismatched unrelated donors (MMURD) are often used as an alternative stem cell source but are associated with increased transplant related complications. Whether ABO incompatibility affects outcome in MMURD transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients is unknown. We evaluated 1,013 AML patients who underwent MMURD transplantation between 2005 and 2014. Engraftment rates were comparable between ABO matched and mismatched patients, as were relapse incidence [34%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 28-39; for ABO matched vs. 36%; 95% CI, 32-40; for ABO mismatched; P=.32], and nonrelapse mortality (28%; 95% CI, 23-33; for ABO matched vs. 25%; 95% CI, 21-29; for ABO mismatched; P=.2). Three year survival was 40% for ABO matched and 43% for ABO mismatched patients (P=.35), Leukemia free survival rates were also comparable between groups (37%; 95% CI, 32-43; for ABO matched vs. 38%; 95% CI, 33-42; for ABO mismatched; P=.87). Incidence of grade II-IV acute graft versus host disease was marginally lower in patients with major ABO mismatching (Hazard ratio of 0.7, 95% CI, 0.5-1; P=.049]. ABO incompatibility probably has no significant clinical implications in MMURD transplantation.
  • Kantomaa, Marko T.; Tikanmaki, Marjaana; Kankaanpaa, Anna; Vaarasmaki, Marja; Sipola-Leppanen, Marika; Ekelund, Ulf; Hakonen, Harto; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kajantie, Eero; Tammelin, Tuija H. (2016)
    This study examined the association of education level with objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in young adults. Data from the Finnish ESTER study (20092011) (n = 538) was used to examine the association between educational attainment and different subcomponents of physical activity and sedentary time measured using hip-worn accelerometers (ActiGraph GT1M) for seven consecutive days. Overall physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), light-intensity physical activity and sedentary time were calculated separately for weekdays and weekend days. A latent profile analysis was conducted to identify the different profiles of sedentary time and the subcomponents of physical activity. The educational differences in accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary time varied according to the subcomponents of physical activity, and between weekdays and weekend days. A high education level was associated with high MVPA during weekdays and weekend days in both sexes, high sedentary time during weekdays in both sexes, and a low amount of light-intensity physical activity during weekdays in males and during weekdays and weekend days in females. The results indicate different challenges related to unhealthy behaviours in young adults with low and high education: low education is associated with a lack of MVPA, whereas high education is associated with a lack of light-intensity physical activity and high sedentary time especially during weekdays.
  • Äyräväinen, Leena; Heikkinen, Anna Maria; Kuuliala, Antti; Ahola, Kirsi; Koivuniemi, Riitta; Peltola, Jaakko; Suomalainen, Anni; Moilanen, Eeva; Hämäläinen, Mari; Laasonen, Leena; Meurman, Jukka H.; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta (2018)
    To study oral health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with emphasis on disease activity and treatment of RA. In this prospective cohort study 81 RA patients [53 early untreated RA (EURA) and 28 chronic RA (CRA) patients with inadequate response to synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs)], underwent rheumatological [Disease Activity Score (28-joint) DAS28] and dental examinations [Total Dental Index (TDI), Decayed Missing Filled Teeth (DMFT) and Decayed Missing Filled Surfaces (DMFS)]. For controls, 43 volunteers were examined. After the examinations, EURA patients started treatment with synthetic DMARDs, oral and intra-articular glucocorticoids. CRA patients were candidates for biological DMARDs. The patients were re-examined mean 16 months later. Results were analyzed with descriptive statistics and logistic regression. TDI was higher in both RA groups at baseline compared to controls [EURA: 2 (2-3); CRA: 2 (1-3); controls 1 (1-3), p = 0.045]. DMFT [r(s) 0.561 (p = 0.002)] and DMFS [r(s) 0.581 (p = 0.001)] associated with DAS28 at baseline in CRA patients. After follow-up, DAS28 associated positively with DMFT [r(s) 0.384 (p = 0.016)] and DMFS [r(s) 0.334 (p = 0.038)] in EURA patients; as well as in CRA patients DMFT [r (s) 0.672 (p = 0.001)], DMFS [r(s) 0.650 (p = 0.001)]. RA patients already in the early phase of the disease had poorer oral health compared to controls. The caries indices associated with the activity of RA in both patient groups. Oral status may thus contribute to the development and further relate to the activity of RA.
  • GBD 2015 Eastern Mediterranean Reg; Mokdad, Ali H.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Rahman, Shiri (2018)
    The 22 countries of the East Mediterranean Region (EMR) have large populations of adolescents aged 10-24 years. These adolescents are central to assuring the health, development, and peace of this region. We described their health needs. Using data from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 (GBD 2015), we report the leading causes of mortality and morbidity for adolescents in the EMR from 1990 to 2015. We also report the prevalence of key health risk behaviors and determinants. Communicable diseases and the health consequences of natural disasters reduced substantially between 1990 and 2015. However, these gains have largely been offset by the health impacts of war and the emergence of non-communicable diseases (including mental health disorders), unintentional injury, and self-harm. Tobacco smoking and high body mass were common health risks amongst adolescents. Additionally, many EMR countries had high rates of adolescent pregnancy and unmet need for contraception. Even with the return of peace and security, adolescents will have a persisting poor health profile that will pose a barrier to socioeconomic growth and development of the EMR.
  • Pakkasela, Johanna; Ilmarinen, Pinja; Honkamäki, Jasmin; Tuomisto, Leena E.; Andersen, Heidi; Piirilä, Päivi; Hisinger-Mölkänen, Hanna; Sovijärvi, Anssi; Backman, Helena; Lundbäck, Bo; Rönmark, Eva; Kankaanranta, Hannu; Lehtimäki, Lauri (2020)
    Background Onset of allergic asthma has a strong association with childhood but only a few studies have analyzed incidence of asthma from childhood to late adulthood in relation to allergy. The purpose of the study was to assess age-specific incidence of allergic and non-allergic asthma. Methods Questionnaires were sent to 8000 randomly selected recipients aged 20-69 years in Finland in 2016. The response rate was 52.3% (n = 4173). The questionnaire included questions on e.g. atopic status, asthma and age at asthma diagnosis. Asthma was classified allergic if also a physician-diagnosed allergic rhinitis was reported. Results The prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma and allergic rhinitis were 11.2 and 17.8%, respectively. Of the 445 responders with physician-diagnosed asthma, 52% were classified as allergic and 48% as non-allergic. Median ages at diagnosis of allergic and non-allergic asthma were 19 and 35 years, respectively. Among subjects with asthma diagnosis at ages 0-9, 10-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59 and 60-69 years, 70, 62, 58, 53, 38, 19 and 33%, respectively, were allergic. For non-allergic asthma, the incidence rate was lowest in children and young adults (0.7/1000/year). It increased after middle age and was highest in older age groups (2.4/1000/year in 50-59 years old). Conclusions The incidence of allergic asthma is highest in early childhood and steadily decreases with advancing age, while the incidence of non-allergic asthma is low until it peaks in late adulthood. After approximately 40 years of age, most of the new cases of asthma are non-allergic.
  • Mikkola, Salla; Salonen, Milla Karoliina; Hakanen, Emma; Sulkama, Sini; Araujo, Cesar; Lohi, Hannes (2021)
    Aggressive behaviour is an unwanted and serious problem in pet dogs, negatively influencing canine welfare, management and public acceptance. We aimed to identify demographic and environmental factors associated with aggressive behaviour toward people in Finnish purebred pet dogs. We collected behavioural data from 13,715 dogs with an owner-completed online questionnaire. Here we used a dataset of 9270 dogs which included 1791 dogs with frequent aggressive behaviour toward people and 7479 dogs without aggressive behaviour toward people. We studied the effect of several explanatory variables on aggressive behaviour with multiple logistic regression. Several factors increased the probability of aggressive behaviour toward people: older age, being male, fearfulness, small body size, lack of conspecific company, and being the owner's first dog. The probability of aggressive behaviour also differed between breeds. These results replicate previous studies and suggest that improvements in the owner education and breeding practices could alleviate aggressive behaviour toward people while genetic studies could reveal associated hereditary factors.