Browsing by Subject "Receptor tyrosine kinase"

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  • Liu, Yixin; Ribeiro, Orquidea De Castro; Robinson, James; Goldman, Adrian (2020)
    The receptor tyrosine kinase RET is essential in a variety of cellular processes. RET gain-of-function is strongly associated with several cancers, notably multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A), while RET loss-of-function causes Hirschsprung's disease and Parkinson's disease. To investigate the activation mechanism of RET as well as to enable drug development, over-expressed recombinant protein is needed for in vitro functional and structural studies. By comparing insect and mammalian cells expression of the RET extracellular domain (RETECD), we showed that the expression yields of RETECD using both systems were comparable, but mammalian cells produced monomeric functional RETECD, whereas RETECD expressed in insect cells was non-functional and multimeric. This was most likely due to incorrect disulfide formation. By fusing an Fc tag to the C-terminus of RETECD, we were able to produce, in HEK293T cells, dimeric oncogenic RETECD (C634R) for the first time. The protein remained dimeric even after cleavage of the tag via the cysteine disulfide, as in full-length RET in the context of MEN 2A and related pathologies. Our work thus provides valuable tools for functional and structural studies of the RET signaling system and its oncogenic activation mechanisms. (C) 2020 Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Heliste, Juho; Jokilammi, Anne; Paatero, Ilkka; Chakroborty, Deepankar; Stark, Christoffer; Savunen, Timo; Laaksonen, Maria; Elenius, Klaus (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) are potential targets for the treatment of ischemic heart disease. The human RTK family consists of 55 members, most of which have not yet been characterized for expression or activity in the ischemic heart. Methods RTK gene expression was analyzed from human heart samples representing healthy tissue, acute myocardial infarction or ischemic cardiomyopathy. As an experimental model, pig heart with ischemia-reperfusion injury, caused by cardiopulmonary bypass, was used, from which phosphorylation status of RTKs was assessed with a phospho-RTK array. Expression and function of one RTK, ROR1, was further validated in pig tissue samples, and in HL-1 cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cardiomyoblasts, exposed to hypoxia and reoxygenation. ROR1 protein level was analyzed by Western blotting. Cell viability after ROR1 siRNA knockdown or activation with Wnt-5a ligand was assessed by MTT assays. Results In addition to previously characterized RTKs, a group of novel active and regulated RTKs was detected in the ischemic heart. ROR1 was the most significantly upregulated RTK in human ischemic cardiomyopathy. However, ROR1 phosphorylation was suppressed in the pig model of ischemia-reperfusion and ROR1 phosphorylation and expression were down-regulated in HL-1 cardiomyocytes subjected to short-term hypoxia in vitro. ROR1 expression in the pig heart was confirmed on protein and mRNA level. Functionally, ROR1 activity was associated with reduced viability of HL-1 cardiomyocytes in both normoxia and during hypoxia-reoxygenation. Conclusions Several novel RTKs were found to be regulated in expression or activity in ischemic heart. ROR1 was one of the most significantly regulated RTKs. The in vitro findings suggest a role for ROR1 as a potential target for the treatment of ischemic heart injury.
  • Heliste, Juho; Jokilammi, Anne; Paatero, Ilkka; Chakroborty, Deepankar; Stark, Christoffer; Savunen, Timo; Laaksonen, Maria; Elenius, Klaus (2018)
    BackgroundReceptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) are potential targets for the treatment of ischemic heart disease. The human RTK family consists of 55 members, most of which have not yet been characterized for expression or activity in the ischemic heart.MethodsRTK gene expression was analyzed from human heart samples representing healthy tissue, acute myocardial infarction or ischemic cardiomyopathy. As an experimental model, pig heart with ischemia-reperfusion injury, caused by cardiopulmonary bypass,was used, from which phosphorylation status of RTKs was assessed with a phospho-RTK array. Expression and function of one RTK, ROR1, was further validated in pig tissue samples, and in HL-1 cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cardiomyoblasts, exposed to hypoxia and reoxygenation. ROR1 protein level was analyzed by Western blotting. Cell viability after ROR1 siRNA knockdown or activation with Wnt-5a ligand was assessed by MTT assays.ResultsIn addition to previously characterized RTKs, a group of novel active and regulated RTKs was detected in the ischemic heart. ROR1 was the most significantly upregulated RTK in human ischemic cardiomyopathy. However, ROR1 phosphorylation was suppressed in the pig model of ischemia-reperfusion and ROR1 phosphorylation and expression were down-regulated in HL-1 cardiomyocytes subjected to short-term hypoxia in vitro. ROR1 expression in the pig heart was confirmed on protein and mRNA level. Functionally, ROR1 activity was associated with reduced viability of HL-1 cardiomyocytes in both normoxia and during hypoxia-reoxygenation.ConclusionsSeveral novel RTKs were found to be regulated in expression or activity in ischemic heart. ROR1 was one of the most significantly regulated RTKs. The in vitro findings suggest a role for ROR1 as a potential target for the treatment of ischemic heart injury.
  • Karaman, Sinem; Leppänen, Veli-Matti; Alitalo, Kari (2018)
    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) are best known for their involvement in orchestrating the development and maintenance of the blood and lymphatic vascular systems. VEGFs are secreted by a variety of cells and they bind to their cognate tyrosine kinase VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) in endothelial cells to elicit various downstream effects. In recent years, there has been tremendous progress in elucidating different VEGF/VEGFR signaling functions in both the blood and lymphatic vascular systems. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we present key elements of the VEGF/VEGFR pathway and highlight the classical and newly discovered functions of VEGF signaling in blood and lymphatic vessel development and pathology.