Browsing by Subject "Remnants"

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  • Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Packard, Chris J.; Boren, Jan (2019)
    Purpose of ReviewApolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) is known to inhibit lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and function as an important regulator of triglyceride metabolism. In addition, apoC-III has also more recently been identified as an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which apoC-III induces hypertriglyceridemia and promotes atherogenesis, as well as the findings from recent clinical trials using novel strategies for lowering apoC-III.Recent FindingsGenetic studies have identified subjects with heterozygote loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in APOC3, the gene coding for apoC-III. Clinical characterization of these individuals shows that the LOF variants associate with a low-risk lipoprotein profile, in particular reduced plasma triglycerides. Recent results also show that complete deficiency of apoC-III is not a lethal mutation and is associated with very rapid lipolysis of plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL). Ongoing trials based on emerging gene-silencing technologies show that intervention markedly lowers apoC-III levels and, consequently, plasma triglyceride. Unexpectedly, the evidence points to apoC-III not only inhibiting LPL activity but also suppressing removal of TRLs by LPL-independent pathways.SummaryAvailable data clearly show that apoC-III is an important cardiovascular risk factor and that lifelong deficiency of apoC-III is cardioprotective. Novel therapies have been developed, and results from recent clinical trials indicate that effective reduction of plasma triglycerides by inhibition of apoC-III might be a promising strategy in management of severe hypertriglyceridemia and, more generally, a novel approach to CHD prevention in those with elevated plasma triglyceride.
  • Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Boren, Jan (2016)
    ApoC-III was discovered almost 50 years ago, but for many years, it did not attract much attention. However, as epidemiological and Mendelian randomization studies have associated apoC-III with low levels of triglycerides and decreased incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), it has emerged as a novel and potentially powerful therapeutic approach to managing dyslipidemia and CVD risk. The atherogenicity of apoC-III has been attributed to both direct lipoprotein lipase-mediated mechanisms and indirect mechanisms, such as promoting secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs), provoking proinflammatory responses in vascular cells and impairing LPL-independent hepatic clearance of TRL remnants. Encouraging results from clinical trials using antisense oligonucleotide, which selectively inhibits apoC-III, indicate that modulating apoC-III may be a potent therapeutic approach to managing dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease risk.