Browsing by Subject "Running"

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  • Lensu, S.; Pekkala, S.P.; Mäkinen, A.; Karstunen, N.; Turpeinen, A.T.; Hulmi, J.J.; Silvennoinen, M.M.; Ma, H.; Kujala, U.M.; Karvinen, S.; Koch, L.G.; Britton, S.L.; Kainulainen, H. (2019)
    Background Physical activity and dietary intake of dairy products are associated with improved metabolic health. Dairy products are rich with branched chain amino acids that are essential for energy production. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the benefit of the sub-chronic effects of running and intake of milk protein supplements, we studied Low Capacity Runner rats (LCR), a rodent exercise model with risk for metabolic disorders. We especially focused on the role of Sirtuins, energy level dependent proteins that affect many cellular metabolic processes. Methods Forty-seven adult LCR female rats sedentary or running voluntarily in wheels were fed normal chow and given supplements of either whey or milk protein drink (PD)-supplemented water, or water only for 21 weeks. Physiological responses were measured in vivo. Blood lipids were determined from serum. Mitochondrial markers and Sirtuins (Sirt1-7) including downstream targets were measured in plantaris muscle by western blotting. Results For the first 10 weeks whey-drinking rats ran about 50% less compared to other groups; still, in all runners glucose tolerance improved and triglycerides decreased. Generally, running induced a ∼six-fold increase in running capacity and a ∼8% decrease in % body fat. Together with running, protein supplements increased the relative lean mass of the total body weight by ∼11%. In comparison with sedentary controls, running and whey increased HDL (21%) and whey, with or without running, lowered LDL (−34%). Running increased mitochondrial biogenesis and Sirtuins 3 and 4. When combined with exercise, both whey and milk protein drink induced about a 4-fold increase in Sirt3, compared to runners drinking water only, and about a 2-fold increase compared to the respective sedentary group. Protein supplements, with or without running, enhanced the phosphorylation level of the acetyl-coA-carboxylase, suggesting increased fat oxidation. Both supplemented diets increased Sirt5 and Sirt7 without an additional effect from exercise. Running diminished and PD supplement increased Sirt6. Conclusion We demonstrate in rats new sub-chronic effects of milk proteins on metabolism that involve Sirtuins and their downstream targets in skeletal muscle. The results show that running and milk proteins act on reducing the risk factors of metabolic disorders and suggest that the underlying mechanisms may involve Sirtuins. Notably, we found that milk protein supplements have some favorable effects on metabolism even without running.
  • Gross, Toomas (2021)
    Recreational running has been a widely popular form of leisure for half a century, and many countries have experienced a marathon boom in the past decades. In recent years, however, runners have started to run in new ways, often in unconventional settings, and compete in races with various alternative formats. Through an ethnographic approach that builds on in-depth narrative interviews with recreational runners, analysis of runners’ blogs, and participant observation in running events in Estonia, I suggest that as completing a marathon becomes a routine activity, increasingly many dedicated runners turn their bodies into veritable “arenas of experimentation.” Drawing on Zeiler’s concept of bodily “eu-appearance” and Ingold’s concerted approach to movement, perception, and knowledge, and building more generally on Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenological perspective, I argue that such corporeal experimentation is motivated by novel sensorial experiences that lead to a heightened awareness of one’s own body as well as by a pursuit of altered and intensified perceptual awareness of the environment one runs in.
  • Kosonen, Jukka; Kulmala, Juha-Pekka; Mueller, Erich; Avela, Janne (2017)
    Anti-pronation orthoses, like medially posted insoles (MPI), have traditionally been used to treat various of lower limb problems. Yet, we know surprisingly little about their effects on overall foot motion and lower limb mechanics across walking and running, which represent highly different loading conditions. To address this issue, multi-segment foot and lower limb mechanics was examined among 11 over-pronating men with normal (NORM) and MPI insoles during walking (self-selected speed 1.70 +/- 0.19 m/s vs 1.72 +/- 0.20 m/s, respectively) and running (4.04 +/- 0.17 m/s vs 4.10 +/- 0.13 m/s, respectively). The kinematic results showed that MPI reduced the peak forefoot eversion movement in respect to both hindfoot and tibia across walking and running when compared to NORM (p <0.05-0.01). No differences were found in hindfoot eversion between conditions. The kinetic results showed no insole effects in walking, but during running MPI shifted center of pressure medially under the foot (p <0.01) leading to an increase in frontal plane moments at the hip (p <0.05) and knee (p <0.05) joints and a reduction at the ankle joint (p <0.05). These findings indicate that MPI primarily controlled the forefoot motion across walking and running. While kinetic response to MPI was more pronounced in running than walking, kinematic effects were essentially similar across both modes. This suggests that despite higher loads placed upon lower limb during running, there is no need to have a stiffer insoles to achieve similar reduction in the forefoot motion than in walking. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Peltonen, Reetta (2021)
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