Browsing by Subject "SAND"

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  • Casaglia, Anna; Coletti, Raffaella; Lizotte, Christopher; Agnew, John; Mamadouh, Virginie; Minca, Claudio (2020)
  • Casaglia, Anna; Coletti, Raffaella; Lizotte, Christopher; Agnew, John; Mamadouh, Virginie; Minca, Claudio (2020)
  • Casaglia, Anna; Coletti, Raffaella; Lizotte, Christopher; Agnew, John; Mamadouh, Virginie; Minca, Claudio (2020)
  • Casaglia, Anna; Coletti, Raffaella; Lizotte, Christopher; Agnew, John; Mamadouh, Virginie; Minca, Claudio (2020)
  • Casaglia, Anna; Coletti, Raffaella; Lizotte, Christopher; Agnew, John; Mamadouh, Virginie; Minca, Claudio (2020)
  • Immonen, Isa Anna Maria; Karikoski, Ninja; Mykkänen, Anna; Niemelä, Tytti; Junnila, Jouni; Tulamo, Riitta-Mari (2017)
    Background: Surgical treatment of colic is expensive and complications may occur. Information on the prognosis and the use of the horse after surgery for colic is important for surgeons and owners. Current literature on return to athletic function after celiotomy is limited. The present study reviewed surgical cases of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Helsinki, Finland for 2006-2012. The aim was to follow the population of horses of different breeds for surgical findings, postsurgical complications, long-term recovery and prognosis. The findings and their influence on survival, return to previous or intended use and performance were assessed. Results: Most of the operated horses (82.6%; 195/236) recovered from anesthesia and 74.9% (146/195) were discharged. The total follow-up time was 8 years and 10 months and the median survival time 79.2 months. Age of the horse, location of the abdominal lesion (small vs. large intestine), incidence of postoperative colic, surgical site infection, incisional hernia or convalescence time after surgery, did not significantly affect the probability of performing in the previous or intended discipline after the surgery. A majority of the discharged horses (83.7%) was able to perform in the previous or intended discipline and 78.5% regained their former or higher level of performance. Operated horses had 0.18 colic episodes per horse-year during the long-term follow-up. The incidence of colic was 20.0% within the first year after surgery. Horses operated for large intestinal colic were 3.3-fold more prone to suffer postoperative colic than horses operated for small intestinal colic. The majority of the owners (96.3%) were satisfied with the veterinary care and nearly all (98.5%) evaluated the recovery after the colic surgery to be satisfactory or above. Conclusions: If the horse survives to discharge, prognosis for long-term survival and return to previous level of sporting activity and performance was good after colic surgery in a population of horses of different breeds. None of the factors studied were found to decrease the probability of performing in the same or intended discipline after surgery. The majority of horses were able to return to their previous activity and perform satisfactorily for several years after surgery.
  • Mönki, J.; Hewetson, M.; Virtala, A.-M. K. (2016)
    BackgroundEquine gastric glandular disease (EGGD) is a term used to classify erosive and ulcerative diseases of the glandular mucosa of the equine stomach. Epidemiologic studies of risk factors for EGGD have not been reported. ObjectiveTo determine risk factors for EGGD. AnimalsCases (n=83) had endoscopic evidence of EGGD; controls (n=34) included healthy horses and horses with equine squamous gastric disease (ESGD) without EGGD. MethodsRetrospective case-control study. The data were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression modeling. Analysis was performed on the full dataset. An additional analysis compared horses with glandular lesions (n=43) against healthy horses (n=22). ResultsOn first analysis, Warmblood breed (OR=13.9, 95% CI 2.2-90.9, P=.005) and an increasing number of caretakers (OR=7.3, 95% CI 0.98-55.6, P=.053) were associated with an increased risk of EGGD. On analysis of the subset of data, Warmblood breed (OR=28.6, 95% CI 2.96-250.0, P=.004) and increasing number of riders (OR=12.99, 95% CI 0.94-166.7, P=.056) were risk factors. The presence of sand in the colon appeared to have a protective effect against EGGD (OR=0.195, 95% CI 0.04-1.0, P=.051 for sand versus not having sand). Conclusions and clinical importanceThis study suggests that Warmbloods are predisposed to EGGD and multiple handlers/riders might increase the risk of EGGD. Identification of risk factors allows speculation on potential pathophysiological mechanisms of EGGD.