Browsing by Subject "SCHIZOPHRENIA-PATIENTS"

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  • Garn, Holger; Bahn, Sabine; Baune, Bernhard T.; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Bisgaard, Hans; Chatila, Talal A.; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Culmsee, Carsten; Dannlowski, Udo; Gay, Steffen; Gern, James; Haahtela, Tari; Kircher, Tilo; Mueller-Ladner, Ulf; Neurath, Markus F.; Preissner, Klaus T.; Reinhardt, Christoph; Rook, Graham; Russell, Shannon; Schmeck, Bernd; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Steinhoff, Ulrich; van Os, Jim; Weiss, Scott; Zemlin, Michael; Renz, Harald (2016)
    Recent research indicates that chronic inflammatory diseases, including allergies and autoimmune and neuropsychiatric diseases, share common pathways of cellular and molecular dysregulation. It was the aim of the International von-Behring-Rontgen Symposium (October 16-18, 2014, in Marburg, Germany) to discuss recent developments in this field. These include a concept of biodiversity; the contribution of urbanization, lifestyle factors, and nutrition (eg, vitamin D); and new mechanisms of metabolic and immune dysregulation, such as extracellular and intracellular RNAs and cellular and mitochondrial stress. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute further to altered gene expression and therefore to the development of chronic inflammation. These novel findings provide the foundation for further development of preventive and therapeutic strategies.
  • Cruz, Gabriela; Grent-'t-Jong, Tineke; Krishnadas, Rajeev; Palva, J. Matias; Palva, Satu; Uhlhaas, Peter J. (2021)
    Long-Range Temporal Correlations (LRTCs) index the capacity of the brain to optimally process information. Previous research has shown that patients with chronic schizophrenia present altered LRTCs at alpha and beta oscillations. However, it is currently unclear at which stage of schizophrenia aberrant LRTCs emerge. To address this question, we investigated LRTCs in resting-state magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings obtained from patients with affective disorders and substance abuse (clinically at low-risk of psychosis, CHR-N), patients at clinical high-risk of psychosis (CHR-P) (n = 115), as well as patients with a first episode (FEP) (n = 25). Matched healthy controls (n = 47) served as comparison group. LRTCs were obtained for frequencies from 4 to 40 Hz and correlated with clinical and neuropsychological data. In addition, we examined the relationship between LRTCs and transition to psychosis in CHR-P participants, and the relationship between LRTC and antipsychotic medication in FEP participants. Our results show that participants from the clinical groups have similar LRTCs to controls. In addition, LRTCs did not correlate with clinical and neurocognitive variables across participants nor did LRTCs predict transition to psychosis. Therefore, impaired LRTCs do not reflect a feature in the clinical trajectory of psychosis. Nevertheless, reduced LRTCs in the beta-band over posterior sensors of medicated FEP participants indicate that altered LRTCs may appear at the onset of the illness. Future studies are needed to elucidate the role of anti-psychotic medication in altered LRTCs.