Browsing by Subject "SERVICES"

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  • Tiihonen, R.; Alaranta, R.; Helkamaa, T.; Nurmi-Lüthje, I.; Kaukonen, J.-P.; Lüthje, P. (2019)
    Background and Aims: Reoperations after operative treatment of hip fracture patients may be associated with higher costs and inferior survival. We examined the acute hospital costs, long-term reoperation rates, and survival of patients with a new hip fracture. Materials and Methods: A total of 490 consecutive new hip fracture patients treated at a single center between 31 December 2004 and 6 December 2006 were analyzed retrospectively. Fractures were classified according to Garden and AO. All medical records were checked manually. The costs of reoperations were calculated using the diagnosis-related groups (DRG)-based prices. Survival analysis was performed using the life-table method. The follow-up time was 10 years. Results: In all, 70/490 patients (14.3%) needed reoperations. Of all reoperations, 34.2% were performed during the first month and 72.9% within 1 year after the primary operation. The hemiarthroplasty dislocation rate was 8.5%, and mechanical failures of osteosynthesis occurred in 6.2%. Alcohol abuse was associated with a heightened risk of reoperation. The mean direct costs of primary fracture care were lower than the mean costs of reoperations (euro7500 vs euro9800). The mortality rate at 10 years was 79.8% among non-reoperated patients and 62.9% among reoperated patients. Conclusions: According to our hypothesis, the cost per patient of reoperation in acute care was 31% higher than the corresponding cost of a primary operation. Reoperations increased the overall immediate costs of index fractures by nearly 20%. One-third of all reoperations were performed during the first month and almost 75% within 1 year after the primary operation.
  • Bagheri, Mehrdad; Mladenovic, Milos; Kosonen, Iisakki; Nurminen, Jukka K; Roncoli, Claudio; Ylä-Jääski, Antti (2020)
    Evaluating potential of shifting to low-carbon transport modes requires considering limited travel-time budget of travelers. Despite previous studies focusing on time-relevant modal shift, there is a lack of integrated and transferable computational frameworks, which would use emerging smartphone-based high-resolution longitudinal travel datasets. This research explains and illustrates a computational framework for this purpose. The proposed framework compares observed trips with computed alternative trips and estimates the extent to which alternatives could reduce carbon emission without a significant increase in travel time.. The framework estimates potential of substituting observed car and public-transport trips with lower-carbon modes, evaluating parameters per individual traveler as well as for the whole city, from a set of temporal and spatial viewpoints. The illustrated parameters include the size and distribution of modal shifts, emission savings, and increased active-travel growth, as clustered by target mode, departure time, trip distance, and spatial coverage throughout the city. Parameters are also evaluated based on the frequently repeated trips. We evaluate usefulness of the method by analyzing door-to-door trips of a few hundred travelers, collected from smartphone traces in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland, during several months. The experiment's preliminary results show that, for instance, on average, 20% of frequent car trips of each traveler have a low-carbon alternative, and if the preferred alternatives are chosen, about 8% of the carbon emissions could be saved. In addition, it is seen that the spatial potential of bike as an alternative is much more sporadic throughout the city compared to that of bus, which has relatively more trips from/to city center. With few changes, the method would be applicable to other cities, bringing possibly different quantitative results. In particular, having more thorough data from large number of participants could provide implications for transportation researchers and planners to identify groups or areas for promoting mode shift. Finally, we discuss the limitations and lessons learned, highlighting future research directions.
  • Voss, Rudi; Quaas, Martin F.; Schmidt, Joern O.; Tahvonen, Olli; Lindegren, Martin; Moellmann, Christian (2014)
  • Elands, B.H.M.; Vierikko, K.; Andersson, E.; Fischer, L.K.; Gonçalves, P.; Haase, D.; Kowarik, I.; Luz, A.C.; Niemelä, J.; Santos-Reis, M.; Wiersum, K.F. (2019)
    Biocultural diversity is an evolving perspective for studying the interrelatedness between people and their natural environment, not only in ecoregional hotspots and cultural landscapes, but also in urban green spaces. Developed in the 1990s in order to denote the diversity of life in all its manifestations. biological, cultural and linguistic. co-evolving within complex socio-ecological systems such as cities, biocultural diversity was identified in the GREEN SURGE project as a response to recent challenges cities face. Most important challenges are the loss of nature and degradation of ecosystems in and around cities as well as an alienation of urban residents from and loss of interaction with nature. The notion of biocultural diversity is dynamic in nature and takes local values and practices of relating to biodiversity of different cultural groups as a starting point for sustainable living with biodiversity. The issue is not only how to preserve or restore biocultural practices and values, but also how to modify, adapt and create biocultural diversity in ways that resonate with urban transformations. As future societies will largely diverge from today's societies, the cultural perspective on living with (urban) nature needs careful reconsideration. Biocultural diversity is not conceived as a definite concept providing prescriptions of what to see and study, but as a reflexive and sensitising concept that can be used to assess the different values and knowledge of people that reflect how they live with biodiversity. This short communication paper introduces a conceptual framework for studying the multi-dimensional features of biocultural diversity in cities along the three key dimensions of materialized, lived and stewardship, being departure points from which biocultural diversity can be studied.
  • Cadilhac, Dominique A.; Dewey, Helen M.; Denisenko, Sonia; Bladin, Christopher F.; Meretoja, Atte (2019)
    BackgroundHospital costs for stroke are increasing and variability in care quality creates inefficiencies. In 2007, the Victorian Government (Australia) employed clinical facilitators for three years in eight public hospitals to improve stroke care. Literature on the cost implications of such roles is rare. We report changes in the costs of acute stroke care following implementation of this program.MethodsObservational controlled before-and-after cohort design. Standardised hospital costing data were compared pre-program (financial year 2006-07) and post-program (2010-11) for all admitted episodes of stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) using ICD-10 discharge codes. Costs in Australian dollars (AUD) were adjusted to a common year 2010. Generalised linear regression models were used for adjusted comparisons.ResultsA 20% increase in stroke and TIA episodes was observed: 2624 pre-program (age>75years: 53%) and 3142 post-program (age>75years: 51%); largely explained by more TIA admissions (up from 785 to 1072). Average length of stay reduced by 22% (pre-program 7.3days to post-program 5.7days, p
  • Valimaki, Maritta; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Hatonen, Heli; Koivunen, Marita; Pitkanen, Anneli; Athanasopoulou, Christina; Anttila, Minna (2017)
    Purpose: Information and communication technologies have been developed for a variety of health care applications and user groups in the field of health care. This study examined the connectivity to computers and the Internet among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs). Patients and methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used to study 311 adults with SSDs from the inpatient units of two psychiatric hospitals in Finland. The data collection lasted for 20 months and was done through patients' medical records and a self-reported, structured questionnaire. Data analysis included descriptive statistics. Results: In total, 297 patients were included in this study (response rate =96%). More than half of them (n=156; 55%) had a computer and less than half of them (n=127; 44%) had the Internet at home. Of those who generally had access to computers and the Internet, more than one-fourth (n=85; 29%) used computers daily, and > 30% (n=96; 33%) never accessed the Internet. In total, approximately one-fourth of them (n=134; 25%) learned to use computers, and less than one-third of them (n=143; 31%) were known to use the Internet by themselves. Older people (aged 45-65 years) and those with less years of education (primary school) tended not to use the computers and the Internet at all (P <0.001), and younger people and those with higher education were associated with more active use. Conclusion: Patients had quite good access to use computers and the Internet, and they mainly used the Internet to seek information. Social, occupational, and psychological functioning (which were evaluated with Global Assessment of Functioning) were not associated with access to and frequency of computer and the Internet use. The results support the use of computers and the Internet as part of clinical work in mental health care.
  • Villnäs, Anna; Norkko, Joanna; Lukkari, Kaarina; Hewitt, Judi; Norkko, Alf (2012)
    Disturbance-mediated species loss has prompted research considering how ecosystem functions are changed when biota is impaired. However, there is still limited empirical evidence from natural environments evaluating the direct and indirect (i.e. via biota) effects of disturbance on ecosystem functioning. Oxygen deficiency is a widespread threat to coastal and estuarine communities. While the negative impacts of hypoxia on benthic communities are well known, few studies have assessed in situ how benthic communities subjected to different degrees of hypoxic stress alter their contribution to ecosystem functioning. We studied changes in sediment ecosystem function (i.e. oxygen and nutrient fluxes across the sediment water-interface) by artificially inducing hypoxia of different durations (0, 3, 7 and 48 days) in a subtidal sandy habitat. Benthic chamber incubations were used for measuring responses in sediment oxygen and nutrient fluxes. Changes in benthic species richness, structure and traits were quantified, while stress-induced behavioral changes were documented by observing bivalve reburial rates. The initial change in faunal behavior was followed by non-linear degradation in benthic parameters (abundance, biomass, bioturbation potential), gradually impairing the structural and functional composition of the benthic community. In terms of ecosystem function, the increasing duration of hypoxia altered sediment oxygen consumption and enhanced sediment effluxes of NH4 + and dissolved Si. Although effluxes of PO4 were not altered significantly, changes were observed in sediment PO4 sorption capability. The duration of hypoxia (i.e. number of days of stress) explained a minor part of the changes in ecosystem function. Instead, the benthic community and disturbancedriven changes within the benthos explained a larger proportion of the variability in sediment oxygen- and nutrient fluxes. Our results emphasize that the level of stress to the benthic habitat matters, and that the link between biodiversity and ecosystem function is likely to be affected by a range of factors in complex, natural environments.
  • Editorial Board BMJ Sexual Reprodu (2018)
  • Gabrysch, Sabine; Nesbitt, Robin C.; Schoeps, Anja; Hurt, Lisa; Soremekun, Seyi; Edmond, Karen; Manu, Alexander; Lohela, Terhi J.; Danso, Samuel; Tomlin, Keith; Kirkwood, Betty; Campbell, Oona M. R. (2019)
    Background Maternal and perinatal mortality are still unacceptably high in many countries despite steep increases in facility birth. The evidence that childbirth in facilities reduces mortality is weak, mainly because of the scarcity of robust study designs and data. We aimed to assess this link by quantifying the influence of major determinants of facility birth (cluster-level facility birth, wealth, education, and distance to childbirth care) on several mortality outcomes, while also considering quality of care. Methods Our study is a secondary analysis of surveillance data on 119 244 pregnancies from two large population-based cluster-randomised controlled trials in Brong Ahafo, Ghana. In addition, we specifically collected data to assess quality of care at all 64 childbirth facilities in the study area. Outcomes were direct maternal mortality, perinatal mortality, first-day and early neonatal mortality, and antepartum and intrapartum stillbirth. We calculated cluster-level facility birth as the percentage of facility births in a woman's village over the preceding 2 years, and we computed distances from women's regular residence to health facilities in a geospatial database. Associations between determinants of facility birth and mortality outcomes were assessed in crude and multivariable multilevel logistic regression models. We stratified perinatal mortality effects by three policy periods, using April 1, 2005, and July 1, 2008, as cutoff points, when delivery-fee exemption and free health insurance were introduced in Ghana. These policies increased facility birth and potentially reduced quality of care. Findings Higher proportions of facility births in a cluster were not linked to reductions in any of the mortality outcomes. In women who were wealthier, facility births were much more common than in those who were poorer, but mortality was not lower among them or their babies. Women with higher education had lower mortality risks than less-educated women, except first-day and early neonatal mortality. A substantially higher proportion of women living in areas closer to childbirth facilities had facility births and caesarean sections than women living further from childbirth facilities, but mortality risks were not lower despite this increased service use. Among women who lived in areas closer to facilities offering comprehensive emergency obstetric care (CEmOC), emergency newborn care, or high-quality routine care, or to facilities that had providers with satisfactory competence, we found a lower risk of intrapartum stillbirth (14.2 per 1000 deliveries at >20 km from a CEmOC facility vs 10.4 per 1000 deliveries at Interpretation Facility birth does not necessarily convey a survival benefit for women or babies and should only be recommended in facilities capable of providing emergency obstetric and newborn care and capable of safeguarding uncomplicated births. Copyright (C) 2019 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.
  • Raatikainen, Ilkka; Vanhala, Mauno; Mäntyselkä, Pekka; Heinonen, Ari; Koponen, Hannu; Kautiainen, Hannu; Korniloff, Katariina (2018)
    Objectives: The main aim of this study was to investigate the association between leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and health care utilization (HCU) and furthermore, socio-demographic and clinical factors according to LTPA level among depressed patients based on data drawn from the Finnish Depression and Metabolic Syndrome in Adults (FDMSA)-study (2009-2016). Methods: 447 depressed patients aged 35-65 from municipalities within the Central Finland Hospital District participated in this study. Depressive symptoms (DS) were determined with the Beck Depression Inventory (a 10 points) and the psychiatric diagnosis confirmed with a diagnostic interview (M.I.N.I.). Severity of depression was evaluated using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). LTPA was assessed using a self reported questionnaire. Use of health services was counted from participant's health care records. Results: Of the 447 depressed patients, 25% reported their LTPA level as low, 41% as moderate and 34% as high. Among depressed patients, higher levels of LTPA were linearly associated with lower BDI (p <0.001), MADRS (p = 0.002), BMI (p = 0.005), triglyceride (p = 0.025) and higher HDL (p = 0.002) values. LTPA level was not related to health care utilization among depressed patients. The health services most used were physician services. Conclusions: According to this study, the level of LTPA in baseline does not predict the future use of health care services among depressed patients in Finnish adult population. Although higher levels of LTPA are positively associated with many health-related factors, promoting PA alone is not enough when aiming to manage and modify HCU among depressed patients.
  • Rydland, Håvard T.; Fjær, Erlend L.; Eikemo, Terje A.; Eikemo, Terje A.; Bambra, Clare; Wendt, Claus; Kulhánová, Ivana; Martikainen, Pekka; Dibben, Chris; Kalėdienė, Ramunė; Borrell, Carme; Leinsalu, Mall; Bopp, Matthias; Mackenbach, Johan P. (2020)
    Background Educational inequalities in health and mortality in European countries have often been studied in the context of welfare regimes or political systems. We argue that the healthcare system is the national level feature most directly linkable to mortality amenable to healthcare. In this article, we ask to what extent the strength of educational differences in mortality amenable to healthcare vary among European countries and between European healthcare system types. Methods This study uses data on mortality amenable to healthcare for 21 European populations, covering ages 35–79 and spanning from 1998 to 2006. ISCED education categories are used to calculate relative (RII) and absolute inequalities (SII) between the highest and lowest educated. The healthcare system typology is based on the latest available classification. Meta-analysis and ANOVA tests are used to see if and how they can explain between-country differences in inequalities and whether any healthcare system types have higher inequalities. Results All countries and healthcare system types exhibited relative and absolute educational inequalities in mortality amenable to healthcare. The low-supply and low performance mixed healthcare system type had the highest inequality point estimate for the male (RII = 3.57; SII = 414) and female (RII = 3.18; SII = 209) population, while the regulation-oriented public healthcare systems had the overall lowest (male RII = 1.78; male SII = 123; female RII = 1.86; female SII = 78.5). Due to data limitations, results were not robust enough to make substantial claims about typology differences. Conclusions This article aims at discussing possible mechanisms connecting healthcare systems, social position, and health. Results indicate that factors located within the healthcare system are relevant for health inequalities, as inequalities in mortality amenable to medical care are present in all healthcare systems. Future research should aim at examining the role of specific characteristics of healthcare systems in more detail.
  • Wu, Zhuochun; Viisainen, Kirsi; Wang, Ying; Hemminki, Elina (2011)
  • Bosqui, Tania; O'Reilly, Dermot; Vaananen, Ari; Patel, Kishan; Donnelly, Michael; Wright, David; Close, Ciara; Kouvonen, Anne (2019)
    PurposeThere is a recent and growing migrant population in Northern Ireland. However, rigorous research is absent regarding access to mental health care by different migrant groups. In order to address this knowledge gap, this study aimed to identify the relative use of psychotropic medication between the largest first generation migrant groups in Northern Ireland and the majority population.MethodsCensus (2011) data was linked to psychotropic prescriptions for the entire enumerated population of Northern Ireland using data linkage methodology through the Administrative Data Research Centre Northern Ireland (ADRC-NI).ResultsLower prescription dispensation for all psychotropic medication types, particularly antidepressants (OR=0.35, CI 95% 0.33-0.36) and anxiolytics (OR=0.42, CI 95% 0.40-0.44), was observed for all migrant groups with the exception of migrants from Germany.ConclusionsIt is likely that the results reflect poorer access to services and indicate a need to improve access and the match between resources, services and the health and social care needs of migrants. Further research is required to identify barriers to accessing primary care and mental health services.
  • Karppinen, Heimo; Hänninen, Maria; Valsta, Lauri Tapani (2018)
    Given the high percentage of private forest ownership in Finland, family forest owners have an important role in mitigating climate change. The study aims to explore Finnish family forest owners' perceptions on climate change and their opinions on increasing carbon storage in their forests through new kinds of management activities and policy instruments. The data consists of thematic face-to-face interviews among Helsinki metropolitan area forest owners (n = 15). These city-dwellers were expected to be more aware of and more interested in climate change mitigation than forest owners at large. Forests as carbon fluxes appear to be a familiar concept to most of the forest owners, but carbon storage in their own forests was a new idea. Four types concerning forest owners' view on storing carbon in their forests could be identified. The Pioneer utilizes forestland versatilely and has already adopted practices to mitigate climate change. The Potential is concerned about climate change, but this is not seen in forest practices applied. The Resistant is generally aware of climate change but sees a fundamental contradiction between carbon storing and wood production. The Indifferent Owner believes that climate change is taking place but does not acknowledge a relation between climate change and the owner's forests.
  • Elovainio, Marko; Hakulinen, Christian; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Aalto, Anna-Mari; Virtanen, Marianna; Partonen, Timo; Suvisaari, Jaana (2020)
    The short versions of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-6), and Mental Health Index (MHI-5) are all valid and reliable measures of general psychological distress, depressive symptoms, and anxiety. We tested the psychometric properties of the scales, their overlap, and their ability to predict mental health service use using both regression and machine learning (ML, random forest) approaches. Data were from the population-based FinHealth-2017 Study of adults (N = 4270) with data on all of the evaluated instruments. Constructive validity, internal consistency, invariance, and optimal cut-off points in predicting mental health services were tested. Constructive validity was acceptable and all instruments measured their own distinct phenomenon. Some of the item scoring in BDI-6 was not optimal, and the sensitivity and specificity of all scales were relatively weak in predicting service use. Small gender differences emerged in optimal cut-off points. ML did not improve model predictions. GHQ-12, BDI-6, and MHI-5 may be interpreted to measure different constructs of psychological health symptoms, but are not particularly useful predictors of service use.
  • Nurmela, Kirsti; Mattila, Aino; Heikkinen, Virpi; Uitti, Jukka; Ylinen, Aarne; Virtanen, Pekka (2018)
    The study explores whether clinical screening targeted at work disabilities among long-term unemployed people reveals eligible individuals for a disability pension and the importance of depression in granting the disability pensions. A total of 364 participants of the screening project were considered as eligible to apply for disability pension. Among them, 188 were diagnosed as clinically depressed. They were classified into those with earlier depression diagnosis (n = 85), those whose depression had not been diagnosed earlier (n = 103), and those without diagnosed depression (n = 176). The association of this Depression identification pattern' with being granted a disability pension was explored by logistic regression analyses. Compared to those with earlier diagnosis, those whose depression had not been diagnosed earlier were granted disability pension more commonly (72% vs. 54% OR 2.2, p = 0.012). Corresponding figures of the undepressed were 73%, OR 2.3, p = 0.002. The adjustments did not affect the results. Clinical examination of the long-term unemployed people in terms of work disability seems to be worthwhile. In particular, the examination reveals new depression diagnoses, which contribute more to the award of disability pension than depression diagnosed earlier by regular health care. Novel ways to detect depression among the unemployed should be implemented in the health and employment services.
  • Laurila-Pant, Mirka; Mäntyniemi, Samu; Venesjärvi, Riikka; Lehikoinen, Annukka (2019)
    Participatory modelling increases the transparency of environmental planning and management processes and enhances the mutual understanding among different parties. We present a sequential probabilistic approach to involve stakeholders' views in the formal decision support process. A continuous Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) model is used to estimate population parameters for stakeholder groups, based on samples of individual value judgements. The approach allows quantification and visualization of the variability in views among and within stakeholder groups. Discrete BBN is populated with these parameters, to summarize and visualize the information and to link it to a larger decision analytic influence diagram (ID). As part of ID, the resulting discrete BBN element serves as a distribution-form decision criteria in probabilistic evaluation of alternative management strategies, to help find a solution that represents the optimal compromise in the presence of potentially conflicting objectives. We demonstrate our idea using example data from the field of marine spatial planning. However, this approach is applicable to many types of management cases. We suggest that by advancing the mutual understanding and concrete participation this approach can further facilitate the stakeholder involvement also during the various stages of the environmental management process. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Ignatius, Suvi Helka Maria; Haapasaari, Päivi Elisabet (2018)
    The ecosystem approach to fisheries management requires ecosystems to be perceived in a holistic way, including the dynamics not only within an ecosystem but also between the ecosystem and society. This implies that people involved in decision-making processes should understand why fish and fisheries are important for society, that is, be aware of the socio-cultural values that people associate with fisheries. In this paper, the justification theory of Boltanski and Thevenot is applied to material collected through a literature review to identify sociocultural values relating to Baltic salmon, and the potential of the approach for fisheries governance is discussed. The analysis demonstrates that fish resources can have multiple meanings to society. Justification theory is found useful for identifying socio-cultural values related to fisheries, since it suggests shifting attention from opposing interests to the common good. Agreeing on the common good is crucial for the legitimacy of governance. However, because the common good can be defined in multiple ways, these definitions have to be made transparent through empirical analysis so that they can be further deliberated, evaluated and agreed upon by governors, stakeholders and others involved.
  • Alexandridis, Nikolaos; Marion, Glenn; Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca; Dainese, Matteo; Ekroos, Johan; Grab, Heather; Jonsson, Mattias; Karp, Daniel S.; Meyer, Carsten; O'Rourke, Megan E.; Pontarp, Mikael; Poveda, Katja; Seppelt, Ralf; Smith, Henrik G.; Martin, Emily A.; Clough, Yann (2021)
    Natural control of invertebrate crop pests has the potential to complement or replace conventional insecticide based practices, but its mainstream application is hampered by predictive unreliability across agroecosystems. Inconsistent responses of natural pest control to changes in landscape characteristics have been attributed to ecological complexity and system-specific conditions. Here, we review agroecological models and their potential to provide predictions of natural pest control across agricultural landscapes. Existing models have used a multitude of techniques to represent specific crop-pest-enemy systems at various spatiotemporal scales, but less wealthy regions of the world are underrepresented. A realistic representation of natural pest control across systems appears to be hindered by a practical trade-off between generality and realism. Nonetheless, observations of context-sensitive, trait-mediated responses of natural pest control to land-use gradients indicate the potential of ecological models that explicitly represent the underlying mechanisms. We conclude that modelling natural pest control across agroecosystems should exploit existing mechanistic techniques towards a framework of contextually bound generalizations. Observed similarities in causal relationships can inform the functional grouping of diverse agroecosystems worldwide and the development of the respective models based on general, but context-sensitive, ecological mechanisms. The combined use of qualitative and quantitative techniques should allow the flexible integration of empirical evidence and ecological theory for robust predictions of natural pest control across a wide range of agroecological contexts and levels of knowledge availability. We highlight challenges and promising directions towards developing such a general modelling framework.
  • Malin, Maarit; Jaakkola, Nina; Luukkonen, Ritva; Heloma, Antero; Lamminpaa, Anne; Reijula, Kari (2020)
    Objectives: Occupational health (OH) professionals could play a prominent role in smoking cessation treatment and support (SCTS) and help individuals and workplaces become smoke free. However, their role has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to assess differences between OH professionals' perceptions of their role in SCTS by measuring three groups of OH professionals' attitudes, knowledge, and motivation concerning SCTS. Methods: We collected data through an online survey completed by a cross-sectional sample of OH professionals: OH physicians (n = 182), OH nurses (n = 296), and OH physiotherapists (n = 96), collected from national trade union registers. The differences between the OH professional groups were analyzed using ANOVA, the Kruskal-Wallis, and chi-square tests. Results: The OH professionals had a positive attitude toward offering SCTS and were highly motivated to enhance their knowledge of this topic and acquire further training. The OH physicians and OH nurses assessed their current knowledge as sufficient. Conversely, the OH physiotherapists' level of knowledge was seen as insufficient. Traditionally, OH physicians and OH nurses have been responsible for carrying out SCTS, but the majority of the OH physiotherapists thought that SCTS should also be included in their job description. Conclusions: All the OH professionals were highly motivated to deepen their knowledge of SCTS. The barriers between different professionals need to be recognized in occupational health services (OHS). OHS should organize its SCTS more effectively, strengthen their contributions to smoking cessation programs, and recognize the potential of OH physiotherapists for providing SCTS and enable them to expand their training.