Browsing by Subject "SF-36"

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  • Haywood, Kirstie L.; Pearson, Nathan; Morrison, Laurie J.; Castren, Maaret; Lilja, Gisela; Perkins, Gavin D. (2018)
    Aim: High quality evidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) can measure the long-term impact of CA. The aim of this study was to critically appraise the evidence of psychometric quality and acceptability of measures used in the assessment of HRQoL in cardiac arrest survivors. Methods: Systematic literature searches (2004-2017) and named author searches to identify articles pertaining to the measurement of HRQoL. Data on study quality, measurement and practical properties were extracted and assessed against international standards. Results: From 356 reviewed abstracts, 69 articles were assessed in full. 25 provided evidence for 10 measures of HRQoL: one condition-specific; three generic profile measures; two generic index; and four utility measures. Although limited, evidence for measurement validity was strongest for the HUI3 and SF-36. However, evidence for reliability, content validity, responsiveness and interpretability and acceptability was generally limited or not available in the CA population for all measures. Conclusions: This review has demonstrated that a measure of quality of life specific to OHCA survivors is not available. Limited evidence of validity exists for one utility measure - the HUI3 - and a generic profile - the SF-36. Robust evidence of the quality and acceptability of HRQoL measures in OHCA was limited or not available. Future collaborative research must seek to urgently establish the relevance and acceptability of these measures to OHCA survivors, to establish robust evidence of essential measurement and practical properties over the short and long-term, and to inform future HRQoL assessment in the OHCA population. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Lallukka, Tea; Sivertsen, Borge; Kronholm, Erkki; Bin, Yu Sun; Overland, Simon; Glozier, Nick (2018)
    Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the interaction of two key determinants of sleep health, quantity and quality, with physical, emotional, and social functioning, in the general population. Design: Nationally-representative Australian cross-sectional study. Setting: General population. Participants: 14,571 people aged 15 or older in Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) in 2013. Measurements: The associations of sleep quality (good/poor) in combination with mid-range (6-8 hours), short (8) sleep duration with functioning, determined from the SF-36, were evaluated using logistic regression adjusting for sociodemographic, relationships, health behaviors, obesity, pain, and mental and physical illness confounders. Results: After adjusting for gender, and age, poor sleep quality in combination with short, mid-range and long sleep was associated with worse physical, emotional and social functioning. Pain and comorbid illness explained much of these associations, while attenuation from other covariates was minor. The associations of poor sleep quality with worse functioning remained after full adjustment regardless of sleep duration, while among people with good quality sleep, only those with long sleep duration reported poorer functioning. Conclusions: Poor sleep quality has robust associations with worse functioning regardless of total duration in the general population. There appears to be a substantial number of functional short sleepers with good quality sleep. (c) 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Manty, Minna; Kouvonen, Anne; Lallukka, Tea; Lahti, Jouni; Lahelma, Eero; Rahkonen, Ossi (2015)
    Objectives The aim this study was to examine the effect of changes in physical and psychosocial working conditions on physical health functioning among ageing municipal employees. Methods Follow-up survey data were collected from midlife employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland, at three time points: wave 1(2000-2002), wave 2(2007), and wave 3 (2012). Changes in physical and psychosocial working conditions were assessed between waves 1 and 2. Physical health functioning was measured by the physical component summary (PCS) of the Short-Form 36 questionnaire at each of the three waves. In total, 2784 respondents (83% women) who remained employed over the follow-up were available for the analyses. Linear mixed-effect models were used to assess the associations and adjust for key covariates (age, gender, obesity, chronic diseases, and health behaviors). Results Repeated and increased exposure to adverse physical working conditions was associated with greater decline in physical health functioning over time. In contrast, decrease in exposures reduced the decline Of the psychosocial working conditions, changes in job demands had no effects on physical health functioning. However, decreased job control was associated with greater decline and repeated high or increased job control reduced the decline in physical health functioning over time. Conclusions Adverse changes in physical working conditions and job control were associated with greater decline in physical health functioning over time, whereas favorable changes in these exposures reduced the decline. Preventing deterioration and promoting improvement of working conditions are likely to help maintain better physical health functioning among ageing employees.
  • Vaatainen, Saku; Cederberg, Henna; Roine, Risto; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Saramies, Jouko; Uusitalo, Hannu; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Martikainen, Janne (2016)
    Objectives Present study examines the relationship between the estimated risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We quantify the association between Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) and HRQoL, and examine the potential use of FINDRISC as tool to evaluate HRQoL indirectly. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study comprising 707 Finnish people without a diagnosis of T2D between the ages of 51 and 75 years. The risk of developing T2D was assessed using the validated and widely used FINDRISC (range 0-26 points), and quality of life was measured using two preference-based HRQoL instruments (15D and SF-6D) and one health profile instrument (SF-36). Effects of the individual FINDRISC items and demographic and clinical characteristics, such as co-morbidities, on HRQoL were studied using multivariable Tobit regression models. Results Low HRQoL was significantly and directly associated with the estimated risk of developing T2D. An approximate 4-5 point change in FINDRISC score was observed to be associated with clinically noticeable changes in the preference-based instrument HRQoL index scores. The association between HRQoL and the risk of developing T2D was also observed for most dimensions of HRQoL in all applied HRQoL instruments. Overall, old age, lack of physical activity, obesity, and history of high blood glucose were the FINDRISC factors most prominently associated with lower HRQoL. Conclusions The findings may help the health care professionals to substantiate the possible improvement in glucose metabolism and HRQoL potentially achieved by lifestyle changes, and better convince people at high risk of T2D to take action towards healthier lifestyle habits. FINDRISC may also provide an accurate proxy for HRQoL, and thus by estimating the risk of T2D with the FINDRISC, information about patients' HRQoL may also be obtained indirectly, when it is not feasible to use HRQoL instruments.
  • Strandberg, T.; Levalahti, E.; Ngandu, T.; Solomon, A.; Kivipelto, M.; Lehtisalo, J.; Laatikainen, T.; Soininen, H.; Antikainen, R.; Jula, A.; Tuomilehto, J.; Peltonen, M.; Lindstrom, J.; Rauramaa, R.; Pajala, S.; Hanninen, T.; Solomon, A.; Paajanen, T.; Mangialasche, F.; FINGER Study Grp (2017)
    Introduction: The Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) successfully demonstrated that multidomain lifestyle intervention can improve or maintain cognitive functioning in at-risk individuals. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was a secondary endpoint. Methods: The intervention (n = 631) aimed at healthy diet, increased physical activity, cognitive training, and vascular risk management. The control group (n = 629) was given general health advice. HRQoL was assessed at baseline, 12, and 24 months using validated RAND-36 (SF-36) instrument with 8 scales. Results: During the 2-year intervention period, mean scores in all scales decreased in the control group, but increased in the intervention group for vitality (12 months), social function (12 months), and especially general health at both 12 and 24 months. There was a statistically significant beneficial effect of intervention on the change in general health and physical function at 12 and 24 months. Conclusion: Multidomain lifestyle intervention improved also important dimensions of HRQoL. (C) 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS and European Union Geriatric Medicine Society. All rights reserved.
  • Mehl, Cathrin Vano; Hollund, Ingrid Marie Husby; Iversen, Johanne Marie; Lydersen, Stian; Mork, Paul Jarle; Kajantie, Eero; Evensen, Kari Anne (2022)
    Background Individuals born small for gestational age (SGA) have an increased risk of several adverse health outcomes, but their health-related quality of life (HRQoL) across young adulthood has yet to be studied. The main aim of this study was to investigate if being born SGA at term is associated with poor HRQoL at 32 years of age. A second aim was to explore longitudinal changes in HRQoL from age 20 to 32 years. Methods In the prospective NTNU Low Birth Weight in a Lifetime Perspective study, 56 participants born SGA and 68 non-SGA control participants completed the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) at age 32 years to assess HRQoL. The SF-36 was also administrated at age 20 and 28 years. Longitudinal changes in the eight SF-36 domains and the two component summaries from 20 to 32 years were analyzed by linear mixed models. In total, 82 adults born SGA and 98 controls participated at least once and were included in the longitudinal analyses. Results At age 32 years the participants born SGA scored 14.8 (95% CI 4.7 to 25.3) points lower in the SF-36 role-physical domain compared with the control group, i.e. more problems with work or other daily activities due to physical health problems. The longitudinal analyses showed significant group differences from 20 to 32 years in the role-emotional domain, and in the physical and mental component summaries. Among participants born SGA, the physical component summary decreased from age 20 to 28 years (-3.2, 95% CI -5.0 to -1.8), while the mental component summary (6.0, 95% CI 2.9 to 8.6) and role-emotional domain score (19.3, 95% CI 9.9 to 30.3) increased, but there were no further changes from 28 to 32 years. There were no longitudinal changes in the control group from 20 to 32 years. Conclusion Overall, individuals born SGA at term reported similar HRQoL at age 32 years compared with non-SGA controls. Self-perceived mental health improved during young adulthood among individuals born SGA, while self-perceived physical health deteriorated. The latter findings warrant further investigation.
  • Lahelma, Eero; Pietiläinen, Olli; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahti, Jouni; Lallukka, Tea (BioMed Central, 2016)
    Abstract Background Mental symptoms are prevalent among populations, but their associations with premature mortality are inadequately understood. We examined whether mental symptoms contribute to cause-specific mortality among midlife employees, while considering key covariates. Methods Baseline mail survey data from 2000–02 included employees, aged 40–60, of the City of Helsinki, Finland (n = 8960, 80 % women, response rate 67 %). Mental symptoms were measured by the General Health Questionnaire 12-item version (GHQ-12) and the Short Form 36 mental component summary (MCS). Covariates included sex, marital status, social support, health behaviours, occupational social class and limiting long-standing illness. Causes of death by the end of 2013 were obtained from Statistics Finland (n = 242) and linked individually to survey data pending consent (n = 6605). Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) were calculated using Cox regression analysis. Results For all-cause mortality, only MCS showed a weak association before adjustments. For natural mortality, no associations were found. For unnatural mortality (n = 21), there was a sex adjusted association with GHQ (HR = 1.96, 95 % CI = 1.45–2.64) and MCS (2.30, 95 % CI = 1.72–3.08). Among unnatural causes of death suicidal mortality (n = 11) was associated with both GHQ (2.20, 95 % CI = 1.47–3.29) and MCS (2.68, 95 % CI = 1.80–3.99). Of the covariates limiting long-standing illness modestly attenuated the associations. Conclusions Two established measures of mental symptoms, i.e. GHQ-12 and SF-36 MCS, were both associated with subsequent unnatural, i.e. accidental and violent, as well as suicidal mortality. No associations were found for natural mortality due to diseases. These findings need to be corroborated in further populations. Supporting mental health through workplace measures may help counteract subsequent suicidal and other unnatural mortality among midlife employees.
  • Lahelma, Eero; Pietilainen, Olli; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahti, Jouni; Lallukka, Tea (2016)
    Background: Mental symptoms are prevalent among populations, but their associations with premature mortality are inadequately understood. We examined whether mental symptoms contribute to cause-specific mortality among midlife employees, while considering key covariates. Methods: Baseline mail survey data from 2000-02 included employees, aged 40-60, of the City of Helsinki, Finland ( n = 8960, 80 % women, response rate 67 %). Mental symptoms were measured by the General Health Questionnaire 12-item version ( GHQ-12) and the Short Form 36 mental component summary ( MCS). Covariates included sex, marital status, social support, health behaviours, occupational social class and limiting long-standing illness. Causes of death by the end of 2013 were obtained from Statistics Finland ( n = 242) and linked individually to survey data pending consent ( n = 6605). Hazard ratios ( HR) and 95 % confidence intervals ( 95 % CI) were calculated using Cox regression analysis. Results: For all-cause mortality, only MCS showed a weak association before adjustments. For natural mortality, no associations were found. For unnatural mortality ( n = 21), there was a sex adjusted association with GHQ ( HR = 1.96, 95 % CI = 1.45-2.64) and MCS ( 2.30, 95 % CI = 1.72-3.08). Among unnatural causes of death suicidal mortality ( n = 11) was associated with both GHQ ( 2.20, 95 % CI = 1.47-3.29) and MCS ( 2.68, 95 % CI = 1.80-3.99). Of the covariates limiting long-standing illness modestly attenuated the associations. Conclusions: Two established measures of mental symptoms, i.e. GHQ-12 and SF-36 MCS, were both associated with subsequent unnatural, i.e. accidental and violent, as well as suicidal mortality. No associations were found for natural mortality due to diseases. These findings need to be corroborated in further populations. Supporting mental health through workplace measures may help counteract subsequent suicidal and other unnatural mortality among midlife employees.
  • Lahti, Anna-Maria; Mikkola, Tuija M.; Salonen, Minna; Wasenius, Niko; Sarvimäki, Anneli; Eriksson, Johan G.; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B. (2021)
    Senior houses provide social interaction and support, potentially supporting older people's physical and mental functioning. Few studies have investigated functioning of senior house residents. The aim was to compare functioning between senior house residents and community-dwelling older adults in Finland. We compared senior house residents (n = 336, 69% women, mean age 83 years) to community-dwelling older adults (n = 1139, 56% women, mean age 74 years). Physical and mental functioning were assessed using the SF 36-Item Health Survey. Loneliness and frequency of social contacts were self-reported. The analyses were adjusted for age, socioeconomic factors and diseases. Physical functioning was lower among men in senior houses compared to community-dwelling men (mean 41.1 vs. 46.4, p = 0.003). Mental functioning or the frequency of social contacts did not differ between type of residence in either sex. Loneliness was higher among women in senior houses compared to community-dwelling women (OR = 1.67, p = 0.027). This was not observed in men. Results suggest that women in senior houses had similar physical and mental functioning compared to community-dwelling women. Male senior house residents had poorer physical functioning compared to community-dwelling men. Women living in senior houses were lonelier than community-dwelling women despite the social environment.
  • Svard, Anna; Lahti, Jouni; Roos, Eira; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahelma, Eero; Lallukka, Tea; Manty, Minna (2017)
    Background: Studies suggest an association between weight change and subsequent poor physical health functioning, whereas the association with mental health functioning is inconsistent. We aimed to examine whether obesity and change of body mass index among normal weight, overweight and obese women and men associate with changes in physical and mental health functioning. Methods: The Helsinki Health Study cohort includes Finnish municipal employees aged 40 to 60 in 2000-02 (phase 1, response rate 67%). Phase 2 mail survey (response rate 82%) took place in 2007 and phase 3 in 2012 (response rate 76%). This study included 5668 participants (82% women). Seven weight change categories were formed based on body mass index (BMI) (phase 1) and weight change (BMI change >= 5%) (phase 1-2). The Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) measured physical and mental health functioning. The change in health functioning (phase 1-3) score was examined with repeated measures analyses. Covariates were age, sociodemographic factors, health behaviours, and somatic ill-health. Results: Weight gain was common among women (34%) and men (25%). Weight-gaining normal weight (-1.3 points), overweight (-1.3 points) and obese (-3.6 points) women showed a greater decline in physical component summary scores than weight-maintaining normal weight women. Among weight-maintainers, only obese (-1.8 points) women showed a greater decline than weight-maintaining normal weight women. The associations were similar, but statistically non-significant for obese men. No statistically significant differences in the change in mental health functioning occurred. Conclusion: Preventing weight gain likely helps maintaining good physical health functioning and work ability.
  • Päivärinne, V.; Kautiainen, H.; Heinonen, A.; Kiviranta, I. (2018)
    To assess the relationship between physical activity (PA) in work, transport, domestic, and leisure-time domains (with sitting time included) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among young adult men. The long version of IPAQ and SF-36 Health Survey were used to assess PA and HRQoL, respectively, in 1425 voluntary 20- to 40-year-old Finnish male participants. Participants were divided into tertiles (MET-h/week): Lowest tertile (100 MET-h/week). The IPAQ domain leisure-time PA predicted positively the Physical Component Summary (PCS) (=0.11, 95% CI: 0.06 to 0.16) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) (=0.11, 95% CI: 0.05 to 0.16) dimensions. Occupational PA predicted negative relationships in the PCS (=-0.13, 95% CI: -0.19 to -0.07), and sitting time predicted negative relationships in the MCS dimension (=-0.13, 95% CI: -0.18 to -0.07). In addition, a linear relationship was found between total PA level (including sitting time) and all of the IPAQ domains (
  • Strandberg, Timo E.; Urtamo, Annele; Kähärä, Juuso; Strandberg, Arto Y.; Pitkälä, Kaisu H.; Kautiainen, Hannu (2018)
    Background: Statin treatment is common among 80+ people, but little is known about statin effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in this oldest age group. Methods: In the Helsinki Businessmen Study (HBS), men born from 1919 to 1934 (original n = 3,490), have been followed-up since the 1960s. In 2015, a questionnaire about lifestyle, diseases, and medications, and including RAND-36/SF-36 HRQoL instrument was mailed to survivors. About 612 men (72.6%) responded, 530 of them reporting their medications (98% community-living). Propensity score analysis was used to compare statin users and nonusers for HRQoL. Results: We compared 229 current statin users (median age 85 years, interquartile range 84-88 years) with 301 nonusers (86; 84-89 years). Current statin users had had significantly higher serum cholesterol level in midlife (p <.001), but current lifestyle-related characteristics were similar in users and nonusers. Statin users reported more hypertension (61.1%, p <.001), diabetes (23.6%, p Conclusions: Our study suggests that statin treatment has no significant effect on health-related quality of life among octogenarian, community-dwelling men. The results contradict concerns about statin treatment in the oldest-old, and may caution against deprescribing of statins due to old age alone.