Browsing by Subject "SHIFT WORK"

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  • Bauer, Michael; Glenn, Tasha; Alda, Martin; Andreassen, Ole A.; Angelopoulos, Elias; Ardau, Raffaella; Ayhan, Yavuz; Baethge, Christopher; Bauer, Rita; Baune, Bernhard T.; Becerra-Palars, Claudia; Bellivier, Frank; Belmaker, Robert H.; Berk, Michael; Bersudsky, Yuly; Bicakci, Sule; Birabwa-Oketcho, Harriet; Bjella, Thomas D.; Cabrera, Jorge; Cheung, Eric Y. Wo; Del Zompo, Maria; Dodd, Seetal; Donix, Markus; Etain, Bruno; Fagiolini, Andrea; Fountoulakis, Kostas N.; Frye, Mark A.; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Gottlieb, John F.; Grof, Paul; Harima, Hirohiko; Henry, Chantal; Isometsä, Erkki T.; Janno, Sven; Kapczinski, Flavio; Kardell, Mathias; Khaldi, Slim; Kliwicki, Sebastian; Konig, Barbara; Kot, Timur L.; Krogh, Rikke; Kunz, Mauricio; Lafer, Beny; Landen, Mikael; Larsen, Erik R.; Lewitzka, Ute; Licht, Rasmus W.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; MacQueen, Glenda; Manchia, Mirko; Marsh, Wendy; Martinez-Cengotitabengoa, Monica; Melle, Ingrid; Meza-Urzua, Fatima; Ming, Mok Yee; Monteith, Scott; Morken, Gunnar; Mosca, Enrica; Mozzhegorova, Anton A.; Munoz, Rodrigo; Mythri, Starlin V.; Nacef, Fethi; Nadella, Ravi K.; Nery, Fabiano G.; Nielsen, Rene E.; O'Donovan, Claire; Omrani, Adel; Osher, Yamima; Sorensen, Helle Ostermark; Ouali, Uta; Ruiz, Yolanda Pica; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Pinna, Marco; da Ponte, Francisco D. R.; Quiroz, Danilo; Ramesar, Raj; Rasgon, Natalie; Reddy, M. S.; Reif, Andreas; Ritter, Philipp; Rybakowski, Janusz K.; Sagduyu, Kemal; Raghuraman, Bharathram Sathur; Scippa, Angela M.; Severus, Emanuel; Simhandl, Christian; Stackhouse, Paul W.; Stein, Dan J.; Strejilevich, Sergio; Subramaniam, Mythily; Sulaiman, Ahmad Hatim; Suominen, Kirsi; Tagata, Hiromi; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Tondo, Leonardo; Torrent, Carla; Vaaler, Arne E.; Vares, Edgar; Veeh, Julia; Vieta, Eduard; Viswanath, Biju; Yoldi-Negrete, Maria; Zetina, Mark; Zgueb, Yosra; Whybrow, Peter C. (2019)
    In many international studies, rates of completed suicide and suicide attempts have a seasonal pattern that peaks in spring or summer. This exploratory study investigated the association between solar insolation and a history of suicide attempt in patients with bipolar I disorder. Solar insolation is the amount of electromagnetic energy from the Sun striking a surface area on Earth. Data were collected previously from 5536 patients with bipolar I disorder at 50 collection sites in 32 countries at a wide range of latitudes in both hemispheres. Suicide related data were available for 3365 patients from 310 onset locations in 51 countries. 1047 (31.1%) had a history of suicide attempt. There was a significant inverse association between a history of suicide attempt and the ratio of mean winter solar insolation/mean summer solar insolation. This ratio is smallest near the poles where the winter insolation is very small compared to the summer insolation. This ratio is largest near the equator where there is relatively little variation in the insolation over the year. Other variables in the model that were positively associated with suicide attempt were being female, a history of alcohol or substance abuse, and being in a younger birth cohort. Living in a country with a state-sponsored religion decreased the association. (All estimated coefficients p <0.01). In summary, living in locations with large changes in solar insolation between winter and summer may be associated with increased suicide attempts in patients with bipolar disorder. Further investigation of the impacts of solar insolation on the course of bipolar disorder is needed.
  • Oksanen, Tuula; Kawachi, Ichiro; Subramanian, S. V.; Kim, Daniel; Shirai, Kokoro; Kouvonen, Anne; Pentti, Jaana; Salo, Paula; Virtanen, Marianna; Vahtera, Jussi; Kivimaki, Mika (2013)
  • Virtanen, Marianna; Oksanen, Tuula; Batty, G. David; Ala-Mursula, Leena; Salo, Paula; Elovainio, Marko; Pentti, Jaana; Lyback, Katinka; Vahtera, Jussi; Kivimaki, Mika (2014)
  • Ervasti, Jenni; Kivimaki, Mika; Pentti, Jaana; Salo, Paula; Oksanen, Tuula; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Marianna (2016)
    Objective: The proportion of aging employees with cardiometabolic diseases, such as heart or cerebrovascular disease, diabetes and chronic hypertension is on the rise. We explored the extent to which health- and work-related factors were associated with the risk of disability pension among individuals with such cardiometabolic disease. Methods: A cohort of 4798 employees with and 9716 employees without a cardiometabolic disease were followed up for 7 years (2005-2011) for disability pension. For these participants, register and survey data (from 2004) were linked to records on disability pensions. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used for estimating the hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Individuals with heart or cerebrovascular disease had 2.88-fold (95% CI = 2.50-331) higher risk of all cause disability pension compared to employees with no cardiometabolic disease. Diabetes was associated with a 1.84-fold (95% CI = 1.52-2.23) and hypertension a 1.50-fold (95% CI = 131-1.72) increased risk of disability pension. Obesity in cases of diabetes and hypertension (15%) and psychological distress in cases of heart or cerebrovascular disease (9%) were the strongest contributing factors. All 12 health- and work-related risk factors investigated accounted for 24% of the excess work disability in hypertension, 28% in diabetes, and 11% in heart or cerebrovascular disease. Cause-specific analyses (disability pension due to mental, musculoskeletal and circulatory system diseases) yielded similar results. Conclusions: In this study, modifiable risk factors, such as obesity and mental comorbidity, predicted permanent exit from the labor market due to disability in individuals with cardiometabolic disease. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Puhkala, Jatta; Kukkonen-Harjula, Katriina; Mansikkamaki, Kirsi; Aittasalo, Minna; Hublin, Christer; Karmeniemi, Paula; Olkkonen, Seppo; Partinen, Markku; Sallinen, Mikael; Tokola, Kari; Fogelholm, Mikael (2015)
    Objectives We conducted a randomized trial among overweight long-distance drivers to study the effects of structured lifestyle counseling on body weight and cardiometabolic risk factors. Methods Men with waist circumference > 100 cm were randomized into a lifestyle counseling (LIFE, N=55) and a reference (REF, N=58) group. The LIFE group participated in monthly counseling on nutrition, physical activity, and sleep for 12 months aiming at 10% weight loss. After 12 months, the REF group participated in 3-month counseling. Assessments took place at 0, 12, and 24 months. Between-group differences in changes were analyzed by generalized linear modeling. Metabolic risk (Z score) was calculated from components of metabolic syndrome. Results The mean body weight change after 12 months was -3.4 kg in LIFE (N=47) and 0.7 kg in REF (N=48) [net difference -4.0 kg, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) -1.9- -6.2]. Six men in LIFE reduced body weight by >= 10%. Changes in waist circumference were -4.7 cm in LIFE and -0.1 cm in REF (net -4.7 cm, 95% CI -6.6- -2.7). Metabolic risk decreased more in the LIFE than REF group (net -1.2 points, 95% CI -0.6- -2.0). After 24 months follow-up, there were no between-group differences in changes in body weight (net -0.5 kg, 95% CI -3.8-2.9) or metabolic risk score (net 0.1 points; 95% CI -0.8-1.0) compared to baseline. Conclusions Weight reduction and decreases in cardiometabolic risk factors were clinically meaningful after 12 months of counseling.
  • Beltagy, Marwa S.; Pentti, Jaana; Vahtera, Jussi; Kivimaki, Mika (2018)
    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the status of night work as a risk factor for common mental disorders (CMD). Methods A cohort study with three data waves was conducted on populations of social and healthcare employees for a duration of eight years (total N=46 010). Data were analyzed as a non-randomized pseudo trial to examine (i) whether moving from non-night work to night work is associated with the development of CMD, (ii) the extent to which moving back to non-night work biases this association and (iii) whether moving from night to non-night work is associated with the recovery from CMD. Results According to logistic regression with generalized estimating equation and without bias-correction, changing to night work was not associated with the odds of acquiring CMD [odds ratio (OR) 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82-1.30]. However, night workers with CMD had higher odds of recovery from CMD when changing to non-night work compared to continuing night work (1.99, 95% CI 1.20-3.28). When night workers developed CMD, the odds of moving back to non-night work increased by 68%. In analyses corrected for this bias, changing from non-night to night work was associated with a 1.25-fold (95% CI 1.03-1.52) increased odds of acquiring CMD. Conclusions A change from non-night to night work may increase the risk of CMD, while moving back from night to non-night work increased recovery from CMD.
  • Haljas, Kadri; Hakaste, Liisa; Lahti, Jari; Isomaa, Bo; Groop, Leif; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Räikkönen, Katri (2019)
    Background: Seasonal variation in glucose metabolism might be driven by changes in daylight. Melatonin entrains circadian regulation and is directly associated with daylight. The relationship between melatonin receptor 1B gene variants with glycemic traits and type 2 diabetes is well established. We studied if daylight length was associated with glycemic traits and if it modified the relationship between melatonin receptor 1B gene rs10830963 variant and glycemic traits. Materials: A population-based sample of 3422 18-78-year-old individuals without diabetes underwent an oral glucose tolerance test twice, an average 6.8 years (SD = 0.9) apart and were genotyped for rs10830963. Daylight data was obtained from the Finnish Meteorological Institute. Results: Cross-sectionally, more daylight was associated with lower fasting glucose, but worse insulin sensitivity and secretion at follow-up. Longitudinally, individuals studied on lighter days at follow-up than at baseline showed higher glucose values during the oral glucose tolerance test and lower Corrected Insulin Response at follow-up. GG genotype carriers in the rs10830963 became more insulin resistant during follow-up if daylight length was shorter at follow-up than at baseline. Conclusions: Our study shows that individual glycemic profiles may vary according to daylight, MTNR1B genotype and their interaction. Future studies may consider taking daylight length into account.Key messages In Western Finland, the amount daylight follows an extensive annual variation ranging from 4 h 44 min to 20 h 17 min, making it ideal to study the associations between daylight and glycemic traits. Moreover, this allows researchers to explore if the relationship between the melatonin receptor 1B gene rs10830963 variant and glycemic traits is modified by the amount of daylight both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. This study shows that individuals, who participated in the study on lighter days at the follow-up than at the baseline, displayed to a greater extent worse glycemic profiles across the follow-up. Novel findings from the current study show that in the longitudinal analyses, each addition of the minor G allele of the melatonin receptor 1B gene rs10830963 was associated with worsening of fasting glucose values and insulin secretion across the 6.8-year follow-up. Importantly, this study shows that in those with the rs10830963 GG genotype, insulin sensitivity deteriorated the most significantly across the 6.8-year follow-up if the daylight length on the oral glucose tolerance testing date at the follow-up was shorter than at the baseline. Taken together, the current findings suggest that the amount of daylight may affect glycemic traits, especially fasting glucose and insulin secretion even though the effect size is small. The association can very according to the rs10830963 risk variant. Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms behind these associations.