Browsing by Subject "SHOCKS"

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  • Ala-Lahti, Matti; Kilpua, Emilia K. J.; Soucek, Jan; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Dimmock, Andrew P. (2019)
    We report on a statistical analysis of the occurrence and properties of Alfven ion cyclotron (AIC) waves in sheath regions driven by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). We have developed an automated algorithm to identify AIC wave events from magnetic field data and apply it to investigate 91 ICME sheath regions recorded by the Wind spacecraft. Our analysis focuses on waves generated by the ion cyclotron instability. AIC waves are observed to be frequent structures in ICME-driven sheaths, and their occurrence is the highest in the vicinity of the shock. Together with previous studies, our results imply that the shock compression has a crucial role in generating wave activity in ICME sheaths. AIC waves tend to have their frequency below the ion cyclotron frequency, and, in general, occur in plasma that is stable with respect to the ion cyclotron instability and has lower ion beta(parallel to) than mirror modes. The results suggest that the ion beta anisotropy beta(perpendicular to)/beta(parallel to) > 1 appearing in ICME sheaths is regulated by both ion cyclotron and mirror instabilities.
  • Saajasto, M.; Juvela, M.; Dobashi, K.; Shimoikura, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Montillaud, J.; Marshall, D. J.; Malinen, J.; Pelkonen, V. -M.; Feher, O.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Toth, L. V.; Montier, L.; Bernard, J. -Ph.; Onishi, T. (2017)
    Context. The combination of line and continuum observations can provide vital insight into the formation and fragmentation of filaments and the initial conditions for star formation. We have carried out line observations to map the kinematics of an evolved, actively star forming filament G82.65-2.00. The filament was first identified from the Planck data as a region of particularly cold dust emission and was mapped at 100-500 mu m as a part of the Herschel key program Galactic Cold Cores. The Herschel observations cover the central part of the filament, corresponding to a filament length of similar to 12 pc at the assumed distance of 620 pc.& para;& para;Aims. CO observations show that the filament has an intriguing velocity field with several velocity components around the filament. In this paper, we study the velocity structure in detail, to quantify possible mass accretion rate onto the filament, and study the masses of the cold cores located in the filament.& para;& para;Methods. We have carried out line observations of several molecules, including CO isotopologues, HCO+, HCN, and CS with the Osaka 1.85 m telescope and the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. The spectral line data are used to derive velocity and column density information.& para;& para;Results. The observations reveal several velocity components in the field, with strongest line emission concentrated to velocity range similar to[3,5] km s(-1). The column density of molecular hydrogen along the filament varies from 1.0 to 2.3 x 10(22) cm(2). We have examined six cold clumps from the central part of the filament. The clumps have masses in the range 10-20 M circle dot (similar to 70 M circle dot in total) and are close to or above the virial mass. Furthermore, the main filament is heavily fragmented and most of the substructures have a mass lower than or close to the virial mass, suggesting that the filament is dispersing as a whole. Position-velocity maps of (CO)-C-12 and (CO)-C-13 lines indicate that at least one of the striations is kinematically connected to two of the clumps, potentially indicating mass accretion from the striation onto the main filament. We tentatively estimate the accretion rate to be M = 2.23 x 10(-6) M circle dot/yr.& para;& para;Conclusions. Our line observations have revealed two or possibly three velocity components connected to the filament G82.65-2.00 and putative signs of mass accretion onto the filament. The line observations combined with Herschel and WISE maps suggest a possible collision between two cloud components.
  • Herwartz, Helmut; Maxand, Simone; Walle, Yabibal (2019)
    Time-varying volatility and linear trends are common features of several macroeconomic time series. Recent articles have proposed panel unit root tests (PURTs) that are pivotal in the presence of volatility shifts, excluding linear trends, however. This article proposes a new PURT that works well for data that is both heteroskedastic and trending. Under the null hypothesis, the test statistic has a limiting Gaussian distribution. We derive the local asymptotic power to underpin the consistency of the test statistic. Simulation results reveal that the test performs well in small samples. As an empirical illustration, we examine the stationarity of energy use per capita in OECD economies. While the series are in general difference stationary, they could also be considered as trend stationary for specific time spans.
  • Palmen, Olli (2020)
    Did sovereign default risk affect macroeconomic activity through firms' access to credit during the European sovereign debt crisis? We investigate this question by a estimating a structural panel vector autoregressive model for Italy, Spain, Portugal, and Ireland, where the sovereign risk shock is identified using sign restrictions. The results suggest that the decline in the creditworthiness of the sovereign contributed to a fall in private lending and economic activity in several euro-area countries by reducing the value of banks' assets and crowding out private lending. (C) 2020 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.