Browsing by Subject "SIGNAL-TRANSDUCTION"

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  • Riederer, Monika; Ojala, Pauli J.; Hrzenjak, Andelko; Tritscher, Michaela; Hermansson, Martin; Watzer, Bernhard; Schweer, Horst; Desoye, Gernot; Heinemann, Akos; Frank, Sasa (2010)
  • Leino, Teppo O.; Turku, Ainoleena; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari Tapani; Kukkonen, Jyrki P.; Xhaard, Henri; Wallén, Erik A. A. (2018)
    A library of 70 000 synthetically accessible azulene-based compounds was virtually screened at the OX2 receptor. Based on the results, a series of azulene derivatives was synthesized and the binding to and activation of both orexin receptor subtypes were assessed. Two most promising binders were determined to have inhibition constants in the 3-9 mu M range and two other compounds showed weak OX2 receptor agonism. Furthermore, three compounds exhibited a concentration-dependent potentiation of the response to orexin-A at the OX1 but not the OX2 receptors. Altogether this data opens new approaches for further development of antagonists, agonists, and potentiators of orexin response based on the azulene scaffold. (C) 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.
  • Hontani, Yusaku; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Baloban, Mikhail; Zhu, Jingyi; Verkhusha, Vladislav; Kennis, John T. M. (2016)
    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins (NIR FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes (BphPs) are of great interest for in vivo imaging. They utilize biliverdin (BV) as a chromophore, which is a heme degradation product, and therefore they are straightforward to use in mammalian tissues. Here, we report on fluorescence properties of NIR FPs with key alterations in their BV binding sites. BphP1-FP, iRFP670 and iRFP682 have Cys residues in both PAS and GAF domains, rather than in the PAS domain alone as in wild-type BphPs. We found that NIR FP variants with Cys in the GAF or with Cys in both PAS and GAF show blue-shifted emission with long fluorescence lifetimes. In contrast, mutants with Cys in the PAS only or no Cys residues at all exhibit red-shifted emission with shorter lifetimes. Combining these results with previous biochemical and BphP1-FP structural data, we conclude that BV adducts bound to Cys in the GAF are the origin of bright blue-shifted fluorescence. We propose that the long fluorescence lifetime follows from (i) a sterically more constrained thioether linkage, leaving less mobility for ring A than in canonical BphPs, and (ii) that pi-electron conjugation does not extend on ring A, making excited-state deactivation less sensitive to ring A mobility.
  • Brelsford, Craig; Morales Suarez, Luis Orlando; Nezval, Jakub; Kotilainen, Titta Katariina; Hartikainen, Saara Maria; Aphalo, Pedro J.; Robson, Thomas Matthew (2019)
    We studied how plants acclimated to growing conditions that included combinations of blue light (BL) and ultraviolet (UV)-A radiation, and whether their growing environment affected their photosynthetic capacity during and after a brief period of acute high light (as might happen during an under-canopy sunfleck). Arabidopsis thaliana Landsberg erecta wild-type were compared with mutants lacking functional blue light and UV photoreceptors: phototropin 1, cryptochromes (CRY1 and CRY2) and UV RESISTANT LOCUS 8 (uvr8). This was achieved using light-emitting-diode (LED) lamps in a controlled environment to create treatments with or without BL, in a split-plot design with or without UV-A radiation. We compared the accumulation of phenolic compounds under growth conditions and after exposure to 30 min of high light at the end of the experiment (46 days), and likewise measured the operational efficiency of photosystem II (phi PSII, a proxy for photosynthetic performance) and dark-adapted maximum quantum yield (F-v/F-m to assess PSII damage). Our results indicate that cryptochromes are the main photoreceptors regulating phenolic compound accumulation in response to BL and UV-A radiation, and a lack of functional cryptochromes impairs photosynthetic performance under high light. Our findings also reveal a role for UVR8 in accumulating flavonoids in response to a low UV-A dose. Interestingly, phototropin 1 partially mediated constitutive accumulation of phenolic compounds in the absence of BL. Low-irradiance BL and UV-A did not improve phi PSII and F-v/F-m upon our acute high-light treatment; however, CRYs played an important role in ameliorating high-light stress.
  • Minato, Yuichi; Ueda, Takumi; Machiyama, Asako; Iwai, Hideo; Shimada, Ichio (2017)
    Bacteria utilize thermotaxis signal transduction proteins, including CheA, and CheY, to switch the direction of the cell movement. However, the thermally responsive machinery enabling warm-seeking behavior has not been identified. Here we examined the effects of temperature on the structure and dynamics of the full-length CheA and CheY complex, by NMR. Our studies revealed that the CheA-CheY complex exists in equilibrium between multiple states, including one state that is preferable for the autophosphorylation of CheA, and another state that is preferable for the phosphotransfer from CheA to CheY. With increasing temperature, the equilibrium shifts toward the latter state. The temperature-dependent population shift of the dynamic domain arrangement of the CheA-CheY complex induced changes in the concentrations of phosphorylated CheY that are comparable to those induced by chemical attractants or repellents. Therefore, the dynamic domain arrangement of the CheA-CheY complex functions as the primary thermally responsive machinery in warm-seeking behavior.
  • Mobarak, Edouard; Håversen, Liliana; Manna, Moutusi; Rutberg, Mikael; Levin, Malin; Perkins, Rosie; Rog, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Boren, Jan (2018)
    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is activated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which drives the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Earlier studies have indicated that cholesterol-and glycosphingolipid-rich subregions of the plasma membrane (lipid domains) are important for TLR4-mediated signaling. We report that inhibition of glucosylceramide (GluCer) synthase, which resulted in decreased concentrations of the glycosphingolipid GluCer in lipid domains, reduced the LPS-induced inflammatory response in both mouse and human macrophages. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the TLR4 dimer complex (with and without LPS in its MD-2 binding pockets) in membranes (in the presence and absence of GluCer) showed that: (1) LPS induced a tilted orientation of TLR4 and increased dimer integrity; (2) GluCer did not affect the integrity of the LPS/TLR4 dimer but reduced the LPS-induced tilt; and (3) GluCer increased electrostatic interactions between the membrane and the TLR4 extracellular domain, which could potentially modulate the tilt. We also showed that GCS inhibition reduced the interaction between TLR4 and the intracellular adaptor protein Mal. We conclude that the GluCer-induced effects on LPS/TLR4 orientation may influence the signaling capabilities of the LPS/TLR4 complex by affecting its interaction with downstream signaling proteins.
  • Rai, Neha; Neugart, Susanne; Yan, Yan; Wang, Fang; Siipola, Sari M.; Lindfors, Anders V.; Winkler, Jana Barbro; Albert, Andreas; Brosche, Mikael; Lehto, Tarja; Morales, Luis O.; Aphalo, Pedro J. (2019)
    Cryptochromes (CRYs) and UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) photoreceptors perceive UV-A/blue (315-500 nm) and UV-B (280-315 nm) radiation in plants, respectively. While the roles of CRYs and UVR8 have been studied in separate controlled-environment experiments, little is known about the interaction between these photoreceptors. Here, Arabidopsis wild-type Ler, CRYs and UVR8 photoreceptor mutants (uvr8-2, cry1cry2 and cry1cry2uvr8-2), and a flavonoid biosynthesis-defective mutant (tt4) were grown in a sun simulator. Plants were exposed to filtered radiation for 17 d or for 6 h, to study the effects of blue, UV-A, and UV-B radiation. Both CRYs and UVR8 independently enabled growth and survival of plants under solar levels of UV, while their joint absence was lethal under UV-B. CRYs mediated gene expression under blue light. UVR8 mediated gene expression under UV-B radiation, and in the absence of CRYs, also under UV-A. This negative regulation of UVR8-mediated gene expression by CRYs was also observed for UV-B. The accumulation of flavonoids was also consistent with this interaction between CRYs and UVR8. In conclusion, we provide evidence for an antagonistic interaction between CRYs and UVR8 and a role of UVR8 in UV-A perception.
  • Hammaren, Henrik M.; Virtanen, Anniina T.; Abraham, Bobin George; Peussa, Heidi; Hubbard, Stevan R.; Silvennoinen, Olli (2019)
    Background: Janus kinases (JAKs; JAK1 to JAK3 and tyrosine kinase 2) mediate cytokine signals in the regulation of hematopoiesis and immunity. JAK2 clinical mutations cause myeloproliferative neoplasms and leukemia, and the mutations strongly concentrate in the regulatory pseudokinase domain Janus kinase homology (JH) 2. Current clinical JAK inhibitors target the tyrosine kinase domain and lack mutation and pathway selectivity. Objective: We sought to characterize mechanisms and differences for pathogenic and cytokine-induced JAK2 activation to enable design of novel selective JAK inhibitors. Methods: We performed a systematic analysis of JAK2 activation requirements using structure-guided mutagenesis, cell-signaling assays, microscopy, and biochemical analysis. Results: Distinct structural requirements were identified for activation of different pathogenic mutations. Specifically, the predominant JAK2 mutation, V617F, is the most sensitive to structural perturbations in multiple JH2 elements (C helix [aC], Src homology 2-JH2 linker, and ATP binding site). In contrast, activation of K539L is resistant to most perturbations. Normal cytokine signaling shows distinct differences in activation requirements: JH2 ATP binding site mutations have only a minor effect on signaling, whereasJH2aCmutations reduce homomeric (JAK2-JAK2) erythropoietin signaling and almost completely abrogate heteromeric (JAK2-JAK1) IFN-gamma signaling, potentially by disrupting a dimerization interface on JH2. Conclusions: These results suggest that therapeutic approaches targeting the JH2 ATP binding site and aC could be effective in inhibiting most pathogenic mutations. JH2 ATP site targeting has the potential for reduced side effects by retaining erythropoietin and IFN-gamma functions. Simultaneously, however, we identified the JH2 aC interface as a potential target for pathway-selective JAK inhibitors in patients with diseases with unmutated JAK2, thus providing new insights into the development of novel pharmacologic interventions.
  • Akhgari, Amir; Laakso, Into; Maaheimo, Hannu; Choi, Young Hae; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Rischer, Heiko (2019)
    Methyl jasmonate is capable of initiating or improving the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in plants and therefore has opened up a concept for the biosynthesis of valuable constituents. In this study, the effect of different doses of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicitation on the accumulation of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) in the hairy root cultures of the medicinal plant, Rhazya stricta throughout a time course (one-seven days) was investigated. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses were carried out for targeted ten major non-polar alkaloids. Furthermore, overall alterations in metabolite contents in elicited and control cultures were investigated applying proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-1 NMR) spectroscopy. Methyl jasmonate caused dosage- and time course-dependent significant rise in the accumulation of TIAs as determined by GC-MS. The contents of seven alkaloids including eburenine, quebrachamine, fluorocarpamine, pleiocarpamine, tubotaiwine, tetrahydroalstonine, and ajmalicine increased compared to non-elicited cultures. However, MeJA-elicitation did not induce the accumulation of vincanine, yohimbine (isomer II), and vallesiachotamine. Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) of H-1 NMR metabolic profiles revealed a discrimination between elicited hairy roots and control cultures with significant increase in total vindoline-type alkaloid content and elevated levels of organic and amino acids. In addition, elicited and control samples had different sugar and fatty acid profiles, suggesting that MeJA also influences the primary metabolism of R. stricta hairy roots. It is evident that methyl jasmonate is applicable for elevating alkaloid accumulation in "hairy root" organ cultures of R. strica.
  • Rai, Neha; Morales, Luis Orlando; Aphalo, Pedro Jose (2021)
    About 95% of the ultraviolet (UV) photons reaching the Earth's surface are UV-A (315-400 nm) photons. Plant responses to UV-A radiation have been less frequently studied than those to UV-B (280-315 nm) radiation. Most previous studies on UV-A radiation have used an unrealistic balance between UV-A, UV-B, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Consequently, results from these studies are difficult to interpret from an ecological perspective, leaving an important gap in our understanding of the perception of solar UV radiation by plants. Previously, it was assumed UV-A/blue photoreceptors, cryptochromes and phototropins mediated photomorphogenic responses to UV-A radiation and "UV-B photoreceptor" UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) to UV-B radiation. However, our understanding of how UV-A radiation is perceived by plants has recently improved. Experiments using a realistic balance between UV-B, UV-A, and PAR have demonstrated that UVR8 can play a major role in the perception of both UV-B and short-wavelength UV-A (UV-A(sw), 315 to similar to 350 nm) radiation. These experiments also showed that UVR8 and cryptochromes jointly regulate gene expression through interactions that alter the relative sensitivity to UV-B, UV-A, and blue wavelengths. Negative feedback loops on the action of these photoreceptors can arise from gene expression, signaling crosstalk, and absorption of UV photons by phenolic metabolites. These interactions explain why exposure to blue light modulates photomorphogenic responses to UV-B and UV-A(sw) radiation. Future studies will need to distinguish between short and long wavelengths of UV-A radiation and to consider UVR8's role as a UV-B/UV-A(sw) photoreceptor in sunlight.
  • Bautista, Godofredo; Pfisterer, Simon G.; Huttunen, Mikko J.; Ranjan, Sanjeev; Kanerva, Kristiina; Ikonen, Elina; Kauranen, Martti (2014)
  • Ehonen, Sanna; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Kollist, Hannes; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko (2019)
    Significance: Stomata sense the intercellular carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration (C-i) and water availability under changing environmental conditions and adjust their apertures to maintain optimal cellular conditions for photosynthesis. Stomatal movements are regulated by a complex network of signaling cascades where reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role as signaling molecules. Recent Advances: Recent research has uncovered several new signaling components involved in CO2- and abscisic acid-triggered guard cell signaling pathways. In addition, we are beginning to understand the complex interactions between different signaling pathways. Critical Issues: Plants close their stomata in reaction to stress conditions, such as drought, and the subsequent decrease in C-i leads to ROS production through photorespiration and over-reduction of the chloroplast electron transport chain. This reduces plant growth and thus drought may cause severe yield losses for agriculture especially in arid areas. Future Directions: The focus of future research should be drawn toward understanding the interplay between various signaling pathways and how ROS, redox, and hormonal balance changes in space and time. Translating this knowledge from model species to crop plants will help in the development of new drought-resistant crop species with high yields. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.
  • Kauppi, P; Lindblad-Toh, K; Sevon, P; Toivonen, H T T; Rioux, J D; Villapakkam, A; Laitinen, L A; Hudson, T J; Kere, J; Laitinen, T (2001)
  • Solman, Maja; Ligabue, Alessio; Blazevits, Olga; Jaiswal, Alok; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Hong; Lectez, Benoit; Kopra, Kari; Guzman, Camilo; Harma, Harri; Hancock, John F.; Aittokallio, Tero; Abankwa, Daniel (2015)
    Hotspot mutations of Ras drive cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Less frequent mutations in Ras are poorly characterized for their oncogenic potential. Yet insight into their mechanism of action may point to novel opportunities to target Ras. Here, we show that several cancer-associated mutations in the switch III region moderately increase Ras activity in all isoforms. Mutants are biochemically inconspicuous, while their clustering into nanoscale signaling complexes on the plasma membrane, termed nanocluster, is augmented. Nanoclustering dictates downstream effector recruitment, MAPK-activity, and tumorigenic cell proliferation. Our results describe an unprecedented mechanism of signaling protein activation in cancer.
  • Takala, Heikki; Edlund, Petra; Ihalainen, Janne A.; Westenhoff, Sebastian (2020)
    Phytochromes are ubiquitous photosensor proteins, which control the growth, reproduction and movement in plants, fungi and bacteria. Phytochromes switch between two photophysical states depending on the light conditions. In analogy to molecular machines, light absorption induces a series of structural changes that are transduced from the bilin chromophore, through the protein, and to the output domains. Recent progress towards understanding this structural mechanism of signal transduction has been manifold. We describe this progress with a focus on bacteriophytochromes. We describe the mechanism along three structural tiers, which are the chromophore-binding pocket, the photosensory module, and the output domains. We discuss possible interconnections between the tiers and conclude by presenting future directions and open questions. We hope that this review may serve as a compendium to guide future structural and spectroscopic studies designed to understand structural signaling in phytochromes.