Browsing by Subject "SINGLE-CELL"

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  • Conesa, Ana; Madrigal, Pedro; Tarazona, Sonia; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Cervera Taboada, Alejandra; McPherson, Andrew; Szczesniak, Michal Wojciech; Gaffney, Daniel J.; Elo, Laura L.; Zhang, Xuegong; Mortazavi, Ali (2016)
    RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) has a wide variety of applications, but no single analysis pipeline can be used in all cases. We review all of the major steps in RNA-seq data analysis, including experimental design, quality control, read alignment, quantification of gene and transcript levels, visualization, differential gene expression, alternative splicing, functional analysis, gene fusion detection and eQTL mapping. We highlight the challenges associated with each step. We discuss the analysis of small RNAs and the integration of RNA-seq with other functional genomics techniques. Finally, we discuss the outlook for novel technologies that are changing the state of the art in transcriptomics.
  • Alanko, Jarno; Alipanahi, Bahar; Settle, Jonathen; Boucher, Christina; Gagie, Travis (2021)
    Motivation: The de Bruijn graph has become a ubiquitous graph model for biological data ever since its initial introduction in the late 1990s. It has been used for a variety of purposes including genome assembly (Zerbino and Birney, 2008; Bankevich et al., 2012; Peng et al., 2012), variant detection (Alipanahi et al., 2020b; Iqbal et al., 2012), and storage of assembled genomes (Chikhi et al., 2016). For this reason, there have been over a dozen methods for building and representing the de Bruijn graph and its variants in a space and time efficient manner. Results: With the exception of a few data structures (Muggli et al., 2019; Holley and Melsted, 2020; Crawford et al.,2018), compressed and compact de Bruijn graphs do not allow for the graph to be efficiently updated, meaning that data can be added or deleted. The most recent compressed dynamic de Bruijn graph (Alipanahi et al., 2020a), relies on dynamic bit vectors which are slow in theory and practice. To address this shortcoming, we present a compressed dynamic de Bruijn graph that removes the necessity of dynamic bit vectors by buffering data that should be added or removed from the graph. We implement our method, which we refer to as BufBOSS, and compare its performance to Bifrost, DynamicBOSS, and FDBG. Our experiments demonstrate that BufBOSS achieves attractive trade-offs compared to other tools in terms of time, memory and disk, and has the best deletion performance by an order of magnitude. (C) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Research Network of Computational and Structural Biotechnology.
  • Madissoon, Elo; Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Tohonen, Virpi; Krjutskov, Kaarel; Petropoulos, Sophie; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Linnarssons, Sten; Lanner, Fredrik; Mansson, Robert; Hovatta, Outi; Burglin, Thomas R.; Katayama, Shintaro; Kere, Juha (2016)
    PAIRED (PRD)-like homeobox genes belong to a class of predicted transcription factor genes. Several of these PRD-like homeobox genes have been predicted in silico from genomic sequence but until recently had no evidence of transcript expression. We found recently that nine PRD-like homeobox genes, ARGFX, CPHX1, CPHX2, DPRX, DUXA, DUXB, NOBOX, TPRX1 and TPRX2, were expressed in human preimplantation embryos. In the current study we characterized these PRD-like homeobox genes in depth and studied their functions as transcription factors. We cloned multiple transcript variants from human embryos and showed that the expression of these genes is specific to embryos and pluripotent stem cells. Overexpression of the genes in human embryonic stem cells confirmed their roles as transcription factors as either activators (CPHX1, CPHX2, ARGFX) or repressors (DPRX, DUXA, TPRX2) with distinct targets that could be explained by the amino acid sequence in homeodomain. Some PRD-like homeodomain transcription factors had high concordance of target genes and showed enrichment for both developmentally important gene sets and a 36 bp DNA recognition motif implicated in Embryo Genome Activation (EGA). Our data implicate a role for these previously uncharacterized PRD-like homeodomain proteins in the regulation of human embryo genome activation and preimplantation embryo development.
  • Anttonen, Tommi; Belevich, Ilya; Laos, Maarja; Herranen, Anni; Jokitalo, Eija; Brakebusch, Cord; Pirvola, Ulla (2017)
    Wound healing in the inner ear sensory epithelia is performed by the apical domains of supporting cells (SCs). Junctional F-actin belts of SCs are thin during development but become exceptionally thick during maturation. The functional significance of the thick belts is not fully understood. We have studied the role of F-actin belts during wound healing in the developing and adult cochlea of mice in vivo. We show that the thick belts serve as intracellular scaffolds that preserve the positions of surviving cells in the cochlear sensory epithelium. Junctions associated with the thick F-actin belts did not readily disassemble during wound healing. To compensate for this, basolateral membranes of SCs participated in the closure of surface breach. Because not only neighboring but also distant SCs contributed to wound healing by basolateral protrusions, this event appears to be triggered by contact-independent diffusible signals. In the search for regulators of wound healing, we inactivated RhoA in SCs, which, however, did not limit wound healing. RhoA inactivation in developing outer hair cells (OHCs) caused myosin II delocalization from the perijunctional domain and apical cell-surface enlargement. These abnormalities led to the extrusion of OHCs from the epithelium. These results demonstrate the importance of stability of the apical domain, both in wound repair by SCs and in development of OHCs, and that only this latter function is regulated by RhoA. Because the correct cytoarchitecture of the cochlear sensory epithelium is required for normal hearing, the stability of cell apices should be maintained in regenerative and protective interventions.
  • Mukherjee, Kingshuk; Rossi, Massimiliano; Salmela, Leena; Boucher, Christina (2021)
    Genome wide optical maps are high resolution restriction maps that give a unique numeric representation to a genome. They are produced by assembling hundreds of thousands of single molecule optical maps, which are called Rmaps. Unfortunately, there are very few choices for assembling Rmap data. There exists only one publicly-available non-proprietary method for assembly and one proprietary software that is available via an executable. Furthermore, the publicly-available method, by Valouev et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103(43):15770-15775, 2006), follows the overlap-layout-consensus (OLC) paradigm, and therefore, is unable to scale for relatively large genomes. The algorithm behind the proprietary method, Bionano Genomics' Solve, is largely unknown. In this paper, we extend the definition of bi-labels in the paired de Bruijn graph to the context of optical mapping data, and present the first de Bruijn graph based method for Rmap assembly. We implement our approach, which we refer to as rmapper, and compare its performance against the assembler of Valouev et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103(43):15770-15775, 2006) and Solve by Bionano Genomics on data from three genomes: E. coli, human, and climbing perch fish (Anabas Testudineus). Our method was able to successfully run on all three genomes. The method of Valouev et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103(43):15770-15775, 2006) only successfully ran on E. coli. Moreover, on the human genome rmapper was at least 130 times faster than Bionano Solve, used five times less memory and produced the highest genome fraction with zero mis-assemblies. Our software, rmapper is written in C++ and is publicly available under GNU General Public License at .
  • Ambers, Angie; Turnbough, Meredith; Benjamin, Robert; Gill-King, Harrell; King, Jonathan; Sajantila, Antti; Budowle, Bruce (2016)
    Forensic and ancient DNA samples often are damaged and in limited quantity as a result of exposure to harsh environments and the passage of time. Several strategies have been proposed to address the challenges posed by degraded and low copy templates, including a PCR based whole genome amplification method called degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR). This study assessed the efficacy of four modified versions of the original DOP-PCR primer that retain at least a portion of the 5' defined sequence and alter the number of bases on the 3' end. The use of each of the four modified primers resulted in improved STR profiles from environmentally-damaged bloodstains, contemporary human skeletal remains, American Civil War era bone samples, and skeletal remains of WWII soldiers over those obtained by previously described DOP-PCR methods and routine STR typing. Additionally, the modified DOP-PCR procedure allows for a larger volume of DNA extract to be used, reducing the need to concentrate the sample and thus mitigating the effects of concurrent concentration of inhibitors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
  • Rumyantsev, Konstantin A.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Verkhusha, Vladislav (2016)
    Bioluminescence imaging became a widely used technique for noninvasive study of biological processes in small animals. Bioluminescent probes with emission in near-infrared (NIR) spectral region confer the advantage of having deep tissue penetration capacity. However, there are a very limited number of currently available luciferases that exhibit NIR bioluminescence. Here, we engineered two novel chimeric probes based on RLuc8 luciferase fused with iRFP670 and iRFP720 NIR fluorescent proteins. Due to an intramolecular bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between RLuc8 and iRFPs, the chimeric luciferases exhibit NIR bioluminescence with maxima at 670 nm and 720 nm, respectively. The 50 nm spectral shift between emissions of the two iRFP chimeras enables combined multicolor bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and the respective multicolor fluorescence imaging (FLI) of the iRFPs. We show that for subcutaneously implanted cells, NIR bioluminescence provided a 10-fold increase in sensitivity compared to NIR FLI. In deep tissues, NIR BLI enabled detection of as low as 10(4) cells. Both BLI and FLI allowed monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis from early to late stages. Multimodal imaging, which combines concurrent BLI and FLI, provides continuous spatiotemporal analysis of metastatic cells in animals, including their localization and quantification.
  • Tohonen, Virpi; Katayama, Shintaro; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Sheikhi, Mona; Madissoon, Elo; Filippini-Cattaneo, Giuditta; Jaconi, Marisa; Johnsson, Anna; Burglin, Thomas R.; Linnarsson, Sten; Hovatta, Outi; Kere, Juha (2015)
    Transcriptional program that drives human preimplantation development is largely unknown. Here, by using single-cell RNA sequencing of 348 oocytes, zygotes and single blastomeres from 2- to 3-day-old embryos, we provide a detailed analysis of the human preimplantation transcriptome. By quantifying transcript far 50-ends (TFEs), we include in our analysis transcripts that derive from alternative promoters. We show that 32 and 129 genes are transcribed during the transition from oocyte to four-cell stage and from four-to eight-cell stage, respectively. A number of identified transcripts originates from previously unannotated genes that include the PRD-like homeobox genes ARGFX, CPHX1, CPHX2, DPRX, DUXA, DUXB and LEUTX. Employing de novo promoter motif extraction on sequences surrounding TFEs, we identify significantly enriched gene regulatory motifs that often overlap with Alu elements. Our high-resolution analysis of the human transcriptome during preimplantation development may have important implications on future studies of human pluripotent stem cells and cell reprograming.