Browsing by Subject "SODIUM"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-4 of 4
  • Dugan, Hilary A.; Summers, Jamie C.; Skaff, Nicholas K.; Krivak-Tetley, Flora E.; Doubek, Jonathan P.; Burke, Samantha M.; Bartlett, Sarah L.; Arvola, Lauri; Jarjanazi, Hamdi; Korponai, Jnos; Kleeberg, Andreas; Monet, Ghislaine; Monteith, Don; Moore, Karen; Rogora, Michela; Hanson, Paul C.; Weathers, Kathleen C. (2017)
    Anthropogenic sources of chloride in a lake catchment, including road salt, fertilizer, and wastewater, can elevate the chloride concentration in freshwater lakes above background levels. Rising chloride concentrations can impact lake ecology and ecosystem services such as fisheries and the use of lakes as drinking water sources. To analyze the spatial extent and magnitude of increasing chloride concentrations in freshwater lakes, we amassed a database of 529 lakes in Europe and North America that had greater than or equal to ten years of chloride data. For each lake, we calculated climate statistics of mean annual total precipitation and mean monthly air temperatures from gridded global datasets. We also quantified land cover metrics, including road density and impervious surface, in buffer zones of 100 to 1,500m surrounding the perimeter of each lake. This database represents the largest global collection of lake chloride data. We hope that long-term water quality measurements in areas outside Europe and North America can be added to the database as they become available in the future.
  • Golda-Cepa, Monika; Riedlova, Kamila; Kulig, Waldemar; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Kotarba, Andrzej (2020)
    Interactions at the solid-body fluid interfaces play a vital role in bone tissue formation at the implant surface. In this study, fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate interactions between the physiological components of body fluids (Ca2+, HPO42-, H2PO4-, Na+, Cl-, and H2O) and functionalized parylene C surface. In comparison to the native parylene C (-Cl surface groups), the introduction of -OH, -CHO, and -COOH surface groups significantly enhances the interactions between body fluid ions and the polymeric surface. The experimentally observed formation of calcium phosphate nanocrystals is discussed in terms of MD simulations of the calcium phosphate clustering. Surface functional groups promote the clustering of calcium and phosphate ions in the following order: -OH > -CHO > -Cl (parent parylene C) approximate to -COO-. This promoting role of surface functional groups is explained as stimulating the number of Ca2+ and HPO42- surface contacts as well as ion chemisorption. The molecular mechanism of calcium phosphate cluster formation at the functionalized parylene C surface is proposed.
  • Li, Kun-Mou; Wilkinson, Craig; Kellosalo, Juho; Tsai, Jia-Yin; Kajander, Tommi; Jeuken, Lars J. C.; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Goldman, Adrian (2016)
    Membrane-bound pyrophosphatases (M-PPases), which couple proton/sodium ion transport to pyrophosphate synthesis/hydrolysis, are important in abiotic stress resistance and in the infectivity of protozoan parasites. Here, three M-PPase structures in different catalytic states show that closure of the substrate-binding pocket by helices 5-6 affects helix 13 in the dimer interface and causes helix 12 to move down. This springs a 'molecular mousetrap', repositioning a conserved aspartate and activating the nucleophilic water. Corkscrew motion at helices 6 and 16 rearranges the key ionic gate residues and leads to ion pumping. The pumped ion is above the ion gate in one of the ion-bound structures, but below it in the other. Electrometric measurements show a single-turnover event with a non-hydrolysable inhibitor, supporting our model that ion pumping precedes hydrolysis. We propose a complete catalytic cycle for both proton and sodium-pumping M-PPases, and one that also explains the basis for ion specificity.
  • Valiev, R. R.; Berezhnoy, A. A.; Gritsenko, I. S.; Merzlikin, B. S.; Cherepanov, Viktor N.; Kurten, Theo; Wöhler, Chrisitan (2020)
    We calculated the cross sections of photolysis of OH, LiO, NaO, KO, HCl, LiCl, NaCl, KCl, HF, LiF, NaF, and KF molecules using quantum chemistry methods. The maximal values for photolysis cross sections of alkali metal monoxides are on the order of 10(-18) cm(2). The lifetimes of photolysis for quiet Sun at 1 astronomical unit are estimated as 2.0 x 10(5), 28, 5, 14, 2.1 x 10(5), 225, 42, 52, 2 x 10(6), 35 400, 486, and 30 400 s for OH, LiO, NaO, KO, HCl, LiCl, NaCl, KCl, HF, LiF, NaF, and KF, respectively. We performed a comparison between values of photolysis lifetimes obtained in this work and in previous studies. Based on such a comparison, our estimations of photolysis lifetimes of OH, HCl, and HF have an accuracy of about a factor of 2. We determined typical kinetic energies of main peaks of photolysis-generated metal atoms. Impact-produced LiO, NaO, KO, NaCl, and KCl molecules are destroyed in the lunar and Hermean exospheres almost completely during the first ballistic flight, while other considered molecules are more stable against destruction by photolysis.