Browsing by Subject "SPATIAL-PATTERNS"

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  • Lucena-Moya, Paloma; Duggan, Ian C. (2017)
    We tested whether variability in zooplankton assemblages was consistent with the categories of estuarine environments proposed by the 'Estuary Environment Classification' system (EEC) (Hume et al., 2007) across a variety of North Island, New Zealand, estuaries. The EEC classifies estuaries in to eight categories (A to F) based primarily on a combination of three abiotic controlling factors: ocean forcing, river forcing and basin morphometry. Additionally, we tested whether Remane's curve, which predicts higher diversities of benthic macrofauna and high and low salinities, can be applied to zooplankton assemblages. We focused on three of the eight EEC categories (B, D and F), which covered the range of estuaries with river inputs dominating (B) to ocean influence dominating (F). Additionally, we included samples from river (FW) and sea (MW) to encompass the entire salinity range. Zooplankton assemblages varied across the categories examined in accordance with a salinity gradient predicted by the EEC. Three groups of zooplankton were distinguishable: the first formed by the most freshwater categories, FW and B, and dominated by rotifers (primarily Bdelloidea) and estuarine copepods (Gladioferans pectinatus), a second group formed by categories D and F, of intermediate salinity, dominated by copepods (Euterpina acutifrons), and a final group including the purely marine category MW and dominated also by E. acutifrons along with other marine taxa. Zooplankton diversity responded to the salinity gradient in a manner expected from Remane's curve. The results of this study support others which have shown salinity to be the main factor driving zooplankton community composition and diversity. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Lehtovirta, S.; Mäkitie, R. E.; Casula, V.; Haapea, M.; Niinimäki, J.; Niinimäki, T.; Peuna, A.; Lammentausta, E.; Mäkitie, O.; Nieminen, M.T. (2019)
    Objective: WNT signaling is of key importance in chondrogenesis and defective WNT signaling may contribute to the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and other cartilage diseases. Biochemical composition of articular cartilage in patients with aberrant WNT signaling has not been studied. Our objective was to assess the knee articular cartilage in WNT1 mutation-positive individuals using a 3.0T MRI unit to measure cartilage thickness, relaxation times, and texture features. Design: Cohort comprised mutation-positive (N = 13; age 17-76 years) and mutation-negative (N = 13; 16-77 years) subjects from two Finnish families with autosomal dominant WNT1 osteoporosis due to a heterozygous missense mutation c.652T>G (p.C218G) in WNT1. All subjects were imaged with a 3.0T MRI unit and assessed for cartilage thickness, T2 and T1 rho relaxation times, and T2 texture features contrast, dissimilarity and homogeneity of T2 relaxation time maps in six regions of interest (ROIs) in the tibiofemoral cartilage. Results: All three texture features showed opposing trends with age between the groups in the medial tibiofemoral cartilage (P = 0.020-0.085 for the difference of the regression coefficients), the mutation-positive individuals showing signs of cartilage preservation. No significant differences were observed in the lateral tibiofemoral cartilage. Cartilage thickness and means of T2 relaxation time did not differ between groups. Means of T1r relaxation time were significantly different in one ROI but the regression analysis displayed no differences. Conclusions: Our results show less age-related cartilage deterioration in the WNT1 mutation-positive than the mutation-negative subjects. This suggests, that the WNT1 mutation may alter cartilage turnover and even have a potential cartilage-preserving effect. (C) 2019 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Kärnä, Olli-Matti; Heino, Jani; Grönroos, Mira; Hjort, Jan (2018)
    Geodiversity, i.e. the variety of the abiotic environment, is considered to be positively correlated to biodiversity. In streams, the importance of physical heterogeneity for biodiversity variation is well known, but the usefulness of explicitly measured geodiversity indices to account for biodiversity has not been tested. We developed a technique to measure in-stream geodiversity, based on different types of stream flow, geomorphological processes and landforms observed from photographs taken during the field work, and substrates based on traditional field observations. We further tested the utility of these geodiversity measures in explaining variation in the biodiversity of macroinvertebrates in near-pristine streams. Our specific objective was to examine the explanatory power of geodiversity compared to traditional environmental variables, such as water chemistry, depth and current velocity. While most biodiversity indices correlated more strongly with traditional environmental variables, the influence of geodiversity on biodiversity was also evident. Unique effect of flow richness on species richness and that of total geodiversity on functional richness were higher than those of the traditional environmental variables. Our findings suggested that in-stream geodiversity offers a valuable concept for characterizing stream habitats. If further developed and tested, in-stream geodiversity can be used as a cost-efficient proxy to explain variation in biodiversity in stream environments.