Browsing by Subject "SSC"

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  • Maseide, Ragnhild J.; Berntorp, Erik; Nummi, Vuokko; Lassila, Riitta; Tjonnfjord, Geir E.; Holme, Pal A. (2021)
    Introduction Predicting the bleeding phenotype is crucial for the management of patients with moderate haemophilia. Global coagulation assays evaluate haemostasis more comprehensively than conventional methods. Aim To explore global coagulation assays and the bleeding phenotype of patients with moderate haemophilia A (MHA) and B (MHB). Methods The MoHem study is a cross-sectional, multicentre study covering Nordic patients with MHA and MHB. Thromboelastometry in whole blood and thrombin generation (TG) in platelet-poor plasma (1, 2.5 and 5 pM tissue factor (TF)) were compared with joint health (Haemophilia Joint Health Score (HJHS)) and treatment modality. Results We report on 61 patients from Oslo and Helsinki: 24 MHA and 37 MHB. By TG (2.5 pM TF), patients who had been without replacement therapy during the previous 12 months depicted higher endogenous thrombin potential (P = .03). In contrast, those who had low ETP (< median) captured higher HJHS (P = .02). Patients who had undergone orthopaedic surgery generated least thrombin (P = .02). By thromboelastometry, those without the need of factor consumption had short clotting times, and quick times to maximum velocity (< median values) (P = .03). Factor VIII/factor IX activity (FVIII/FIX:C) did not align with the bleeding phenotype, but FIX:C Conclusion TG differentiated patients with moderate haemophilia according to HJHS, annual factor consumption, and whether orthopaedic surgery had been performed. Thromboelastometry differentiated according to factor consumption only. Global coagulation assays may assist predicting the bleeding phenotype in moderate haemophilia.
  • Rodeghiero, Francesco; Pabinger, Ingrid; Ragni, Margaret; Abdul-Kadir, Rezan; Berntorp, Erik; Blanchette, Victor; Bodo, Imre; Casini, Alessandro; Gresele, Paolo; Lassila, Riitta; Leebeek, Frank; Lillicrap, David; Mezzano, Diego; Noris, Patrizia; Srivastava, Alok; Tosetto, Alberto; Windyga, Jerzy; Zieger, Barbara; Makris, Mike; Key, Nigel (2019)
    Healthy subjects frequently report minor bleedings that are frequently 'background noise' of normality rather than a true disorder. Nevertheless, unexpected or unusual bleeding may be alarming. Thus, the distinction between normal and pathologic bleeding is critical. Understanding the underlying pathologic mechanism in patients with an excessive bleeding is essential for their counseling and treatment. Most of these patients with significant bleeding will result affected by non-severe inherited bleeding disorders (BD), collectively denominated mild or moderate BD for their relatively benign course. Unfortunately, practical recommendations for the management of these disorders are still lacking due to the current state of fragmented knowledge of pathophysiology and lack of a systematic diagnostic approach. To address this gap, an International Working Group (IWG) was established by the European Hematology Association (EHA) to develop consensus-based guidelines on these disorders. The IWG agreed that grouping these disorders by their clinical phenotype under the single category of mild-to-moderate bleeding disorders (MBD) reflects current clinical practice and will facilitate a systematic diagnostic approach. Based on standardized and harmonized definitions a conceptual unified framework is proposed to distinguish normal subjects from affected patients. The IWG proposes a provisional comprehensive patient-centered initial diagnostic approach that will result in classification of MBD into distinct clinical-pathological entities under the overarching principle of clinical utility for the individual patient. While we will present here a general overview of the global management of patients with MBD, this conceptual framework will be adopted and validated in the evidence-based, disease-specific guidelines under development by the IWG.