Browsing by Subject "STAR-FORMATION"

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  • Vardoulaki, E.; Andrade, E. F. Jimenez; Karim, A.; Novak, M.; Leslie, S. K.; Tisanic, K.; Smolcic, V.; Schinnerer, E.; Sargent, M. T.; Bondi, M.; Zamorani, G.; Magnelli, B.; Bertoldi, F.; Ruiz, N. Herrera; Mooley, K. P.; Delhaize, J.; Myers, S. T.; Marchesi, S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Gozaliasl, G.; Finoguenov, A.; Middleberg, E.; Ciliegi, P. (2019)
    Context. Given the unprecedented depth achieved in current large radio surveys, we are starting to probe populations of radio sources that have not been studied in the past. However, identifying and categorising these objects, differing in size, shape and physical properties, is becoming a more difficult task. Aims. In this data paper we present and characterise the multi-component radio sources identified in the VLA-COSMOS Large Project at 3 GHz (0.75 arcsec resolution, 2.3 mu Jy beam(-1) rms), i.e. the radio sources which are composed of two or more radio blobs. Methods. The classification of objects into multi-components was done by visual inspection of 351 of the brightest and most extended blobs from a sample of 10,899 blobs identified by the automatic code BLOBCAT. For that purpose we used multi-wavelength information of the field, such as the 1.4 GHz VLA-COSMOS data and the Ultra Deep Survey with the VISTA telescope (UltraVISTA) stacked mosaic available for COSMOS. Results. We have identified 67 multi-component radio sources at 3 GHz: 58 sources with active galactic nucleus (AGN) powered radio emission and nine star-forming galaxies. We report eight new detections that were not observed by the VLA-COSMOS Large Project at 1.4 GHz, due to the slightly larger area coverage at 3 GHz. The increased spatial resolution of 0.75 arcsec has allowed us to resolve (and isolate) multiple emission peaks of 28 extended radio sources not identified in the 1.4 GHz VLA-COSMOS map. We report the multi-frequency flux densities (324 MHz, 325 MHz, 1.4 GHz & 3 GHz), star formation rates, and stellar masses of these objects. We find that multi-component objects at 3 GHz VLA-COSMOS inhabit mainly massive galaxies (>10(10.5)M(circle dot)). The majority of the multi-component AGN lie below the main sequence of star-forming galaxies (SFGs), in the green valley and the quiescent region. Furthermore, we provide detailed descriptions of the objects and find that amongst the AGN there are two head-tail, ten corelobe, nine wide-angle-tail (WAT), eight double-double or Z-/X-shaped, three bent-tail radio sources, and 26 symmetric sources, while amongst the SFGs we find the only star-forming ring seen in radio emission in COSMOS. Additionally, we report a large number (32 out of 58) of disturbed/bent multi-component AGN, 18 of which do not lie within X-ray groups in COSMOS (redshift range 0.08 Conclusion. The high angular resolution and sensitivity of the 3 GHz VLA-COSMOS data set give us the opportunity to identify peculiar radio structures and sub-structures of multi-component objects, and relate them to physical phenomena such as AGN or star-forming galaxies. This study illustrates the complexity of the mu Jy radio-source population; at the sensitivity and resolution of 3 GHz VLA-COSMOS, the radio structures of AGN and SFG both emitting radio continuum emission, become comparable in the absence of clear, symmetrical jets. Thus, disentangling the AGN and SFG contributions using solely radio observations can be misleading in a number of cases. This has implications for future surveys, such as those done by square kilometre array (SKA) and precursors, which will identify hundreds of thousands of multi-component objects.
  • Feher, O.; Juvela, M.; Lunttila, T.; Montillaud, J.; Ristorcelli, I.; Zahorecz, S.; Toth, L. V. (2017)
    Context. The physical state of cold cloud clumps has a great impact on the process and efficiency of star formation and the masses of the forming stars inside these objects. The sub-millimetre survey of the Planck space observatory and the far-infrared follow-up mapping of the Herschel space telescope provide an unbiased, large sample of these cold objects. Aims. We have observed (CO)-C-12(1-0) and (CO)-C-13(1-0) emission in 35 high-density clumps in 26 Herschel fields sampling different environments in the Galaxy. Here, we aim to derive the physical properties of the objects and estimate their gravitational stability. Methods. The densities and temperatures of the clumps were calculated from both the dust continuum and the molecular line data. Kinematic distances were derived using (CO)-C-13(1-0) line velocities to verify previous distance estimates and the sizes and masses of the objects were calculated by fitting 2D Gaussian functions to their optical depth distribution maps on 250 mu m. The masses and virial masses were estimated assuming an upper and lower limit on the kinetic temperatures and considering uncertainties due to distance limitations. Results. The derived excitation temperatures are between 8.5-19.5 K, and for most clumps between 10 15 K, while the Herschel-derived dust colour temperatures are more uniform, between 12 16 K. The sizes (0.1-3 pc), (CO)-C-13 column densities (0.5-44 x 10(15) cm(-2)) and masses (from less than 0.1 M-circle dot to more than 1500 M-circle dot) of the objects all span broad ranges. We provide new kinematic distance estimates, identify gravitationally bound or unbound structures and discuss their nature. Conclusions. The sample contains objects on a wide scale of temperatures, densities and sizes. Eleven gravitationally unbound clumps were found, many of them smaller than 0.3 pc, but large, parsec-scale clouds with a few hundred solar masses appear as well. Colder clumps have generally high column densities but warmer objects appear at both low and higher column densities. The clump column densities derived from the line and dust observations correlate well, but are heavily affected by uncertainties of the dust properties, varying molecular abundances and optical depth effects.
  • Hsu, Shih-Ying; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Liu, Tie; Sahu, Dipen; Hirano, Naomi; Lee, Chin-Fei; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Kim, Gwanjeong; Juvela, Mika; Sanhueza, Patricio; He, Jinhua; Johnstone, Doug; Qin, Sheng-Li; Bronfman, Leonardo; Chen, Huei-Ru Vivien; Dutta, Somnath; Eden, David J.; Jhan, Kai-Syun; Kim, Kee-Tae; Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Kwon, Woojin; Lee, Chang Won; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Moraghan, Anthony; Rawlings, M. G.; Shang, Hsien; Soam, Archana; Thompson, M. A.; Traficante, Alessio; Wu, Yuefang; Yang, Yao-Lun; Zhang, Qizhou (2020)
    We report the detection of four new hot corino sources, G211.47-19.27S, G208.68-19.20N1, G210.49-19.79W, and G192.12-11.10, from a survey study of Planck Galactic Cold Clumps in the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex with the Atacama Compact Array. Three sources had been identified as low-mass Class 0 protostars in the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey. One source in the lambda Orionis region is first reported as a protostellar core. We have observed abundant complex organic molecules (COMs), primarily methanol but also other oxygen-bearing COMs (in G211.47-19.27S and G208.68-19.20N1) and the molecule of prebiotic interest NH2CHO (in G211.47-19.27S), signifying the presence of hot corinos. While our spatial resolution is not sufficient to resolve most of the molecular emission structure, the large line width and high rotational temperature of COMs suggest that they likely reside in the hotter and innermost region immediately surrounding the protostar. In G211.47-19.27S, the D/H ratio of methanol ([CH2DOH]/[CH3OH]) and the(12)C/C-13 ratio of methanol ([CH3OH]/[(CH3OH)-C-13]) are comparable to those of other hot corinos. Hydrocarbons and long-carbon-chain molecules such as c-C(3)H(2)and HCCCN are also detected in the four sources, likely tracing the outer and cooler molecular envelopes.
  • Allevato, V.; Viitanen, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Civano, F.; Suh, H.; Shankar, F.; Bongiorno, A.; Ferrara, A.; Gilli, R.; Miyaji, T.; Marchesi, S.; Cappelluti, N.; Salvato, M. (2019)
    Aims. We perform clustering measurements of 800 X-ray selected Chandra COSMOS Legacy (CCL) Type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGN) with known spectroscopic redshift to probe the halo mass dependence on AGN host galaxy properties, such as galaxy stellar mass M-star, star formation rate (SFR), and specific black hole accretion rate (BHAR; lambda(BHAR)) in the redshift range z;=;[0-3]. Methods. We split the sample of AGN with known spectroscopic redshits according to M-star, SFR and lambda(BHAR), while matching the distributions in terms of the other parameters, including redshift. We measured the projected two-point correlation function w(p)(r(p)) and modeled the clustering signal, for the different subsamples, with the two-halo term to derive the large-scale bias b and corresponding typical mass of the hosting halo. Results. We find no significant dependence of the large-scale bias and typical halo mass on galaxy stellar mass and specific BHAR for CCL Type 2 AGN at mean z;similar to;1, while a negative dependence on SFR is observed, i.e. lower SFR AGN reside in richer environment. Mock catalogs of AGN, matched to have the same X-ray luminosity, stellar mass, lambda(BHAR), and SFR of CCL Type 2 AGN, almost reproduce the observed M-star - M-h, lambda(BHAR) - M-h and SFR-M-h relations, when assuming a fraction of satellite AGN f(AGN)(sat) similar to 0.15fAGNsat similar to 0.15$ f_{\mathrm{AGN}}{\mathrm{sat}} \sim 0.15 $. This corresponds to a ratio of the probabilities of satellite to central AGN of being active Q;similar to;2. Mock matched normal galaxies follow a slightly steeper M-star - M-h relation, in which low mass mock galaxies reside in less massive halos than mock AGN of similar mass. Moreover, matched mock normal galaxies are less biased than mock AGN with similar specific BHAR and SFR, at least for Q > 1.
  • Saajasto, M.; Juvela, M.; Dobashi, K.; Shimoikura, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Montillaud, J.; Marshall, D. J.; Malinen, J.; Pelkonen, V. -M.; Feher, O.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Toth, L. V.; Montier, L.; Bernard, J. -Ph.; Onishi, T. (2017)
    Context. The combination of line and continuum observations can provide vital insight into the formation and fragmentation of filaments and the initial conditions for star formation. We have carried out line observations to map the kinematics of an evolved, actively star forming filament G82.65-2.00. The filament was first identified from the Planck data as a region of particularly cold dust emission and was mapped at 100-500 mu m as a part of the Herschel key program Galactic Cold Cores. The Herschel observations cover the central part of the filament, corresponding to a filament length of similar to 12 pc at the assumed distance of 620 pc.& para;& para;Aims. CO observations show that the filament has an intriguing velocity field with several velocity components around the filament. In this paper, we study the velocity structure in detail, to quantify possible mass accretion rate onto the filament, and study the masses of the cold cores located in the filament.& para;& para;Methods. We have carried out line observations of several molecules, including CO isotopologues, HCO+, HCN, and CS with the Osaka 1.85 m telescope and the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. The spectral line data are used to derive velocity and column density information.& para;& para;Results. The observations reveal several velocity components in the field, with strongest line emission concentrated to velocity range similar to[3,5] km s(-1). The column density of molecular hydrogen along the filament varies from 1.0 to 2.3 x 10(22) cm(2). We have examined six cold clumps from the central part of the filament. The clumps have masses in the range 10-20 M circle dot (similar to 70 M circle dot in total) and are close to or above the virial mass. Furthermore, the main filament is heavily fragmented and most of the substructures have a mass lower than or close to the virial mass, suggesting that the filament is dispersing as a whole. Position-velocity maps of (CO)-C-12 and (CO)-C-13 lines indicate that at least one of the striations is kinematically connected to two of the clumps, potentially indicating mass accretion from the striation onto the main filament. We tentatively estimate the accretion rate to be M = 2.23 x 10(-6) M circle dot/yr.& para;& para;Conclusions. Our line observations have revealed two or possibly three velocity components connected to the filament G82.65-2.00 and putative signs of mass accretion onto the filament. The line observations combined with Herschel and WISE maps suggest a possible collision between two cloud components.
  • Harju, Jorma; Sipilä, Olli; Brunken, Sandra; Schlemmer, Stephan; Caselli, Paola; Juvela, Mika; Menten, Karl M.; Stutzki, Juergen; Asvany, Oskar; Kaminski, Tomasz; Okada, Yoko; Higgins, Ronan (2017)
    We report on the detection of the ground-state rotational line of ortho-D2H+ at 1.477 THz (203 mu m) using the German REceiver for Astronomy at Terahertz frequencies (GREAT) on. board the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The line is seen in absorption against. far-infrared continuum from the protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422 in Ophiuchus. The para-D2H+ line at 691.7 GHz was not detected with the APEX telescope toward this position. These D2H+ observations complement our previous detections of para-H2D+ and ortho-H2D+ using SOFIA and APEX. By modeling chemistry and radiative transfer in the dense core surrounding the protostars, we find that the ortho-D2H+ and para-H2D+ absorption features mainly originate in the cool (T <18 K) outer envelope of the core. In contrast, the ortho-H2D+ emission from the core is significantly absorbed by the ambient molecular cloud. Analyses of the combined D2H+ and H2D+ data result in an age estimate of similar to 5. x. 10(5) yr for the core, with an uncertainty of similar to 2. x. 10(5) yr. The core material has probably been pre-processed for another 5. x. 10(5) years in conditions corresponding to those in the ambient molecular cloud. The inferred timescale is more than 10 times the age of the embedded protobinary. The D2H+ and H2D+ ions have large and nearly equal total (ortho+ para) fractional abundances of similar to 10(-9) in the outer envelope. This confirms the central role of H-3 + in the deuterium chemistry in cool, dense gas, and adds support to the prediction of chemistry models that also D-3(+) should be abundant in these conditions.
  • Juvela, Mika; Neha, Sharma; Mannfors, Emma; Saajasto, Mika; Ysard, Nathalie; Pelkonen, Veli-Matti (2020)
    Context. LDN 1642 is a rare example of a star-forming, high-latitude molecular cloud. The dust emission of LDN 1642 has already been studied extensively in the past, but its location also makes it a good target for studies of light scattering.Aims. We wish to study the near-infrared (NIR) light scattering in LDN 1642, its correlation with the cloud structure, and the ability of dust models to simultaneously explain observations of sub-millimetre dust emission, NIR extinction, and NIR scattering.Methods. We used observations made with the HAWK-I instrument to measure the NIR surface brightness and extinction in LDN 1642. These data were compared with Herschel observations of dust emission and, with the help of radiative transfer modelling, with the predictions calculated for different dust models.Results. We find, for LDN 1642, an optical depth ratio tau (250 mu m)/tau (J) approximate to 10(-3), confirming earlier findings of enhanced sub-millimetre emissivity. The relationships between the column density derived from dust emission and the NIR colour excesses are linear and consistent with the shape of the standard NIR extinction curve. The extinction peaks at A(J) = 2.6 mag, and the NIR surface brightness remains correlated with N(H-2) without saturation. Radiative transfer models are able to fit the sub-millimetre data with any of the tested dust models. However, these predict an NIR extinction that is higher and an NIR surface brightness that is lower than based on NIR observations. If the dust sub-millimetre emissivity is rescaled to the observed value of tau (250 mu m)/tau (J), dust models with high NIR albedo can reach the observed level of NIR surface brightness. The NIR extinction of the models tends to be higher than in the direct extinction measurements, which is also reflected in the shape of the NIR surface brightness spectra.Conclusions. The combination of emission, extinction, and scattering measurements provides strong constraints on dust models. The observations of LDN 1642 indicate clear dust evolution, including a strong increase in the sub-millimetre emissivity, which has not been fully explained by the current dust models yet.
  • Schirmer, T.; Abergel, A.; Verstraete, L.; Ysard, N.; Juvela, M.; Jones, A. P.; Habart, E. (2020)
    Context. Micro-physical processes on interstellar dust surfaces are tightly connected to dust properties (i.e. dust composition, size, and shape) and play a key role in numerous phenomena in the interstellar medium (ISM). The large disparity in physical conditions (i.e. density and gas temperature) in the ISM triggers an evolution of dust properties. The analysis of how dust evolves with the physical conditions is a stepping stone towards a more thorough understanding of interstellar dust.Aims. We highlight dust evolution in the Horsehead nebula photon-dominated region.Methods. We used Spitzer/IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8 mu m) and Spitzer/MIPS (24 mu m) together with Herschel/PACS (70 and 160 mu m) and Herschel/SPIRE (250, 350 and 500 mu m) to map the spatial distribution of dust in the Horsehead nebula over the entire emission spectral range. We modelled dust emission and scattering using the THEMIS interstellar dust model together with the 3D radiative transfer code SOC.Results. We find that the nano-grain dust-to-gas ratio in the irradiated outer part of the Horsehead is 6-10 times lower than in the diffuse ISM. The minimum size of these grains is 2-2.25 times larger than in the diffuse ISM, and the power-law exponent of their size distribution is 1.1-1.4 times lower than in the diffuse ISM. In the denser part of the Horsehead nebula, it is necessary to use evolved grains (i.e. aggregates, with or without an ice mantle).Conclusions. It is not possible to explain the observations using grains from the diffuse medium. We therefore propose the following scenario to explain our results. In the outer part of the Horsehead nebula, all the nano-grain have not yet had time to re-form completely through photo-fragmentation of aggregates and the smallest of the nano-grain that are sensitive to the radiation field are photo-destroyed. In the inner part of the Horsehead nebula, grains most likely consist of multi-compositional mantled aggregates.
  • Euclid Collaboration; Adam, R.; Kurki-Suonio, H. (2019)
    Galaxy cluster counts in bins of mass and redshift have been shown to be a competitive probe to test cosmological models. This method requires an efficient blind detection of clusters from surveys with a well-known selection function and robust mass estimates, which is particularly challenging at high redshift. The Euclid wide survey will cover 15 000 deg(2) of the sky, avoiding contamination by light from our Galaxy and our solar system in the optical and near-infrared bands, down to magnitude 24 in the H-band. The resulting data will make it possible to detect a large number of galaxy clusters spanning a wide-range of masses up to redshift similar to 2 and possibly higher. This paper presents the final results of the Euclid Cluster Finder Challenge (CFC), fourth in a series of similar challenges. The objective of these challenges was to select the cluster detection algorithms that best meet the requirements of the Euclid mission. The final CFC included six independent detection algorithms, based on different techniques, such as photometric redshift tomography, optimal filtering, hierarchical approach, wavelet and friend-of-friends algorithms. These algorithms were blindly applied to a mock galaxy catalog with representative Euclid-like properties. The relative performance of the algorithms was assessed by matching the resulting detections to known clusters in the simulations down to masses of M-200 similar to 10(13.25) M-circle dot. Several matching procedures were tested, thus making it possible to estimate the associated systematic effects on completeness to 80% completeness for a mean purity of 80% down to masses of 10(14) M-circle dot and up to redshift z = 2. Based on these results, two algorithms were selected to be implemented in the Euclid pipeline, the Adaptive Matched Identifier of Clustered Objects (AMICO) code, based on matched filtering, and the PZWav code, based on an adaptive wavelet approach.
  • Euclid Collaboration; Guglielmo, Christopher G.; Gozaliasl, G.; Keihanen, E.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Kirkpatrick IV, C.C. (2020)
    The Complete Calibration of the Colour-Redshift Relation survey (C3R2) is a spectroscopic e ffort involving ESO and Keck facilities designed specifically to empirically calibrate the galaxy colour-redshift relation - P(z jC) to the Euclid depth (iAB = 24 :5) and is intimately linked to the success of upcoming Stage IV dark energy missions based on weak lensing cosmology. The aim is to build a spectroscopic calibration sample that is as representative as possible of the galaxies of the Euclid weak lensing sample. In order to minimise the number of spectroscopic observations necessary to fill the gaps in current knowledge of the P(z jC), self-organising map (SOM) representations of the galaxy colour space have been constructed. Here we present the first results of an ESO@VLT Large Programme approved in the context of C3R2, which makes use of the two VLT optical and near-infrared multi-object spectrographs, FORS2 and KMOS. This data release paper focuses on high-quality spectroscopic redshifts of high-redshift galaxies observed with the KMOS spectrograph in the near-infrared H- and K-bands. A total of 424 highly-reliable redshifts are measured in the 1:3 2 galaxies.
  • Georgakakis, A.; Comparat, J.; Merloni, A.; Ciesla, L.; Aird, J.; Finoguenov, A. (2019)
    A semi-empirical model is presented that describes the distribution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on the cosmicweb. It populates dark-matter haloes in N-body simulations (MultiDark) with galaxy stellar masses using empirical relations based on abundance matching techniques, and then paints accretion events on these galaxies using state-of-the-art measurements of the AGN occupation of galaxies. The explicit assumption is that the large-scale distribution of AGN is independent of the physics of black hole fuelling. The model is shown to be consistent with current measurements of the two-point correlation function of AGN samples. It is then used to make inferences on the halo occupation of the AGN population. Mock AGNs are found in haloes with a broad distribution of masses with a mode of approximate to 10(12) h(-1) M-circle dot and a tail extending to cluster-size haloes. The clustering properties of the model AGN depend only weakly on accretion luminosity and redshift. The fraction of satellite AGN in the model increases steeply toward more massive haloes, in contrast with some recent observational results. This discrepancy, if confirmed, could point to a dependence of the halo occupation of AGN on the physics of black hole fuelling.
  • Juvela, M.; Malinen, J.; Montillaud, J.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Ristorcelli, I.; Tóth, L. V. (2018)
    Context. The Galactic Cold Cores (GCC) project has made Herschel photometric observations of interstellar clouds where Planck detected compact sources of cold dust emission. The fields are in different environments and stages of star formation. Aims. Our aim is to characterise the structure of the clumps and their parent clouds, and to study the connections between the environment and the formation of gravitationally bound objects. We also examine the accuracy to which the structure of dense clumps can be determined from sub-millimetre data. Methods. We use standard statistical methods to characterise the GCC fields. Individual clumps are extracted using column density thresholding. Based on sub-millimetre measurements, we construct a three-dimensional radiative transfer (RT) model for each field. These are used to estimate the relative radiation field intensities, to probe the clump stability, and to examine the uncertainty of column density estimates. We examine the structural parameters of the clumps, including their radial column density profiles. Results. In the GCC fields, the structure noise follows the relations previously established at larger scales and in lower-density clouds. The fractal dimension has no significant dependence on column density and the values D-p = 1.25 +/- 0.07 are only slightly lower than in typical molecular clouds. The column density probability density functions (PDFs) exhibit large variations, for example, in the case of externally compressed clouds. At scales r > 0.1 pc, the radial column density distributions of the clouds follow an average relation of N similar to r(-1). In spite of a great variety of clump morphologies (and a typical aspect ratio of 1.5), clumps tend to follow a similar N similar to r(-1) relation below r similar to 0.1 pc. RT calculations indicate only factor 2.5 variation in the local radiation field intensity. The fraction of gravitationally bound clumps increases significantly in regions with A v > 5 mag but most bound objects appear to be pressure-confined. Conclusions. The host clouds of the cold clumps in the GCC sample have statistical properties similar to general molecular clouds. The gravitational stability, peak column density, and clump orientation are connected to the cloud background while most other statistical clump properties (e.g. D-p and radial profiles) are insensitive to the environment. The study of clump morphology should be continued with a comparison with numerical simulations.
  • McAlpine, Stuart; Harrison, Chris M.; Rosario, David J.; Alexander, David M.; Ellison, Sara L.; Johansson, Peter H.; Patton, David R. (2020)
    We investigate the connection between galaxy-galaxy mergers and enhanced black hole (BH) growth using the cosmological hydrodynamical EAGLE simulation. We do this via three methods of analysis, investigating: the merger fraction of AGN, the AGN fraction of merging systems, and the AGN fraction of galaxies with close companions. In each case, we find an increased abundance of AGN within merging systems relative to control samples of inactive or isolated galaxies (by up to a factor of approximate to 3 depending on the analysis method used), confirming that mergers are enhancing BH accretion rates for at least a subset of the galaxy population. The greatest excess of AGN triggered via a merger are found in lower mass (M-* similar to 10(10) M-circle dot) gas rich (f(gas) > 0.2) central galaxies with lower mass BHs (M-BH similar to 10(7) M-circle dot) at lower redshifts (z <1). We find no enhancement of AGN triggered via mergers in more massive galaxies (M-* greater than or similar to 10(11) M-circle dot). The enhancement of AGN is not uniform throughout the phases of a merger, and instead peaks within the early remnants of merging systems (typically lagging approximate to 300 Myr post-coalescence of the two galaxies at z = 0.5). We argue that neither major (M-*,M-1/M-*,M-2 = 1/4) nor minor mergers (1/10 <M-*,M-1/M-*,M-2 <1/4) are statistically relevant for enhancing BH masses globally. Whilst at all redshifts the galaxies experiencing a merger have accretion rates that are on average 2-3 times that of isolated galaxies, the majority of mass that is accreted on to BHs occurs outside the periods of a merger. We compute that on average no more than 15 per cent of a BHs final day mass comes from the enhanced accretion rates triggered via a merger.
  • Bulut, N.; Roncero, O.; Aguado, A.; Loison, J-C; Navarro-Almaida, D.; Wakelam, V.; Fuente, A.; Roueff, E.; Le Gal, R.; Caselli, P.; Gerin, M.; Hickson, K. M.; Spezzano, S.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Alonso-Albi, T.; Bachiller, R.; Jimenez-Serra, Izaskun; Kramer, C.; Tercero, B.; Rodriguez-Baras, M.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Trevino-Morales, S. P.; Esplugues, G.; Cazaux, S.; Commercon, B.; Laas, J.; Kirk, J.; Lattanzi, M.; Martin-Domenech, R.; Munoz-Caro, G.; Pineda, J.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Tafalla, M.; Marcelino, N.; Malinen, J.; Friesen, R.; Giuliano, B. M.; Agundez, M.; Hacar, A. (2021)
    Context. Carbon monosulphide (CS) is among the most abundant gas-phase S-bearing molecules in cold dark molecular clouds. It is easily observable with several transitions in the millimeter wavelength range, and has been widely used as a tracer of the gas density in the interstellar medium in our Galaxy and external galaxies. However, chemical models fail to account for the observed CS abundances when assuming the cosmic value for the elemental abundance of sulfur. Aims. The CS+O -> CO + S reaction has been proposed as a relevant CS destruction mechanism at low temperatures, and could explain the discrepancy between models and observations. Its reaction rate has been experimentally measured at temperatures of 150-400 K, but the extrapolation to lower temperatures is doubtful. Our goal is to calculate the CS+O reaction rate at temperatures Methods. We performed ab initio calculations to obtain the three lowest potential energy surfaces (PES) of the CS+O system. These PESs are used to study the reaction dynamics, using several methods (classical, quantum, and semiclassical) to eventually calculate the CS + O thermal reaction rates. In order to check the accuracy of our calculations, we compare the results of our theoretical calculations for T similar to 150-400 K with those obtained in the laboratory. Results. Our detailed theoretical study on the CS+O reaction, which is in agreement with the experimental data obtained at 150-400 K, demonstrates the reliability of our approach. After a careful analysis at lower temperatures, we find that the rate constant at 10 K is negligible, below 10(-15) cm(3) s(-1), which is consistent with the extrapolation of experimental data using the Arrhenius expression. Conclusions. We use the updated chemical network to model the sulfur chemistry in Taurus Molecular Cloud 1 (TMC 1) based on molecular abundances determined from Gas phase Elemental abundances in Molecular CloudS (GEMS) project observations. In our model, we take into account the expected decrease of the cosmic ray ionization rate, zeta(H2), along the cloud. The abundance of CS is still overestimated when assuming the cosmic value for the sulfur abundance.
  • Fuente, A.; Navarro, D. G.; Caselli, P.; Gerin, M.; Kramer, C.; Roueff, E.; Alonso-Albi, T.; Bachiller, R.; Cazaux, S.; Commercon, B.; Friesen, R.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Giuliano, B. M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Gratier, P.; Hacar, A.; Jimenez-Serra, Izaskun; Kirk, J.; Lattanzi, Fernando Alfredo; Loison, J. C.; Malinen, J.; Marcelino, N.; Martin-Domenech, R.; Munoz-Caro, G.; Pineda, J.; Tafalla, M.; Tercero, B.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Trevino-Morales, S. P.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Roncero, O.; Vidal, T.; Ballester, M. Y. (2019)
    GEMS is an IRAM 30 m Large Program whose aim is determining the elemental depletions and the ionization fraction in a set of prototypical star-forming regions. This paper presents the first results from the prototypical dark cloud Taurus molecular cloud (TMC) 1. Extensive millimeter observations have been carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope (3 and 2mm) and the 40 m Yebes telescope (1.3 cm and 7 mm) to determine the fractional abundances of CO, HCO+, HCN, CS, SO, HCS+, and N2H+ in three cuts which intersect the dense filament at the well-known positions TMC 1-CP, TMC 1-NH3, and TMC 1-C, covering a visual extinction range from A(v) similar to 3 to similar to 20 mag. Two phases with differentiated chemistry can be distinguished: (i) the translucent envelope with molecular hydrogen densities of 1-5 x 10(3) cm(-3); and (ii) the dense phase, located at A(v) > 10 mag, with molecular hydrogen densities >10(4) cm(-3). Observations and modeling show that the gas phase abundances of C and O progressively decrease along the C+/C/CO transition zone (A(v) similar to 3 mag) where C/H similar to 8 x 10(-5) and C/O similar to 0.8-1, until the beginning of the dense phase at A(v) similar to 10 mag. This is consistent with the grain temperatures being below the CO evaporation temperature in this region. In the case of sulfur, a strong depletion should occur before the translucent phase where we estimate an S/H similar to (0.4-2.2) x 10(-6), an abundance similar to 7-40 times lower than the solar value. A second strong depletion must be present during the formation of the thick icy mantles to achieve the values of S/H measured in the dense cold cores (S/H similar to 8 x 10(-8)). Based on our chemical modeling, we constrain the value of zeta(H2) to similar to(0.5-1.8) x 10(-16) s(-1) in the translucent cloud.
  • Ford, E. Darragh; Laigle, C.; Gozaliasl, G.; Pichon, C.; Devriendt, J.; Slyz, A.; Arnouts, S.; Dubois, Y.; Finoguenov, A.; Griffiths, R.; Kraljic, K.; Pan, H.; Peirani, S.; Sarron, F. (2019)
    Cosmic filaments are the channel through which galaxy groups assemble their mass. Cosmic connectivity, namely the number of filaments connected to a given group, is therefore expected to be an important ingredient in shaping group properties. The local connectivity is measured in COSMOS around X-ray-detected groups between redshift 0.5 and 1.2. To this end, large-scale filaments are extracted using the accurate photometric redshifts of the COSMOS2015 catalogue in two-dimensional slices of thickness 120 comoving Mpc centred on the group's redshift. The link between connectivity, group mass, and the properties of the brightest group galaxy (BGG) is investigated. The same measurement is carried out on mocks extracted from the light-cone of the hydrodynamical simulation HORIZON-AGN in order to control systematics. More massive groups are on average more connected. At fixed group mass in low-mass groups, BGG mass is slightly enhanced at high connectivity, while in high-mass groups BGG mass is lower at higher connectivity. Groups with a star-forming BGG have on average a lower connectivity at given mass. From the analysis of the HORIZON-AGN simulation, we postulate that different connectivities trace different paths of group mass assembly: at high group mass, groups with higher connectivity are more likely to have grown through a recent major merger, which might be in turn the reason for the quenching of the BGG. Future large-field photometric surveys, such as Euclid and LSST, will be able to confirm and extend these results by probing a wider mass range and a larger variety of environment.
  • Haines, C. P.; Finoguenov, A.; Smith, G. P.; Babul, A.; Egami, E.; Mazzotta, P.; Okabe, N.; Pereira, M. J.; Bianconi, M.; Mcgee, S. L.; Ziparo, F.; Campusano, L. E.; Loyola, C. (2018)
    Galaxy clusters are expected to form hierarchically in a Lambda cold dark matter (Lambda CDM) universe, growing primarily through mergers with lower mass clusters and the continual accretion of group-mass haloes. Galaxy clusters assemble late, doubling their masses since z similar to 0.5, and so the outer regions of clusters should be replete with accreting group-mass systems. We present an XMM-Newton survey to search for X-ray groups in the infall regions of 23 massive galaxy clusters (<M-200 > similar to 10(15)M(circle dot)) at z similar to 0.2, identifying 39 X-ray groups that have been spectroscopically confirmed to lie at the cluster redshift. These groups have mass estimates in the range 2 x 10(13)-7 x 10(14)M(circle dot), and group-to-cluster mass ratios as low as 0.02. The comoving number density of X-ray groups in the infall regions is similar to 25x higher than that seen for isolated X-ray groups from the XXL survey. The average mass per cluster contained within these X-ray groups is 2.2 x 10(14)M(circle dot), or 19 +/- 5 per cent of the mass within the primary cluster itself. We estimate that similar to 10(15)M(circle dot) clusters increase their masses by 16 +/- 4 per cent between z = 0.223 and the present day due to the accretion of groups with M-200 >= 10(13.2)M(circle dot). This represents about half of the expected mass growth rate of clusters at these late epochs. The other half is likely to come from smooth accretion of matter not bound within haloes. The mass function of the infalling X-ray groups appears significantly top heavy with respect to that of 'field' X-ray systems, consistent with expectations from numerical simulations, and the basic consequences of collapsed massive dark matter haloes being biased tracers of the underlying large-scale density distribution.
  • Auddy, Sayantan; Myers, Philip C.; Basu, Shantanu; Harju, Jorma; Pineda, Jaime E.; Friesen, Rachel K. (2019)
    We develop a new "core field structure" (CFS) model to predict the magnetic field strength and magnetic field fluctuation profile of dense cores using gas kinematics. We use spatially resolved observations of the nonthermal velocity dispersion from the Green Bank Ammonia survey along with column density maps from SCUBA-2 to estimate the magnetic field strength across seven dense cores located in the L1688 region of Ophiuchus. The CFS model predicts the profile of the relative field fluctuation, which is related to the observable dispersion in the direction of the polarization vectors. Within the context of our model, we find that all of the cores have a transcritical mass-to-flux ratio.
  • Soam, Archana; Liu, Tie; Andersson, B-G; Lee, Chang Won; Liu, Junhao; Juvela, Mika; Li, Pak Shing; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Zhang, Qizhou; Koch, Patrick M.; Kim, Kee-Tae; Qiu, Keping; Evans, Neal J.; Johnstone, Doug; Thompson, Mark; Ward-Thompson, Derek; Di Francesco, James; Tang, Ya-Wen; Montillaud, Julien; Kim, Gwanjeong; Mairs, Steve; Sanhueza, Patricio; Kim, Shinyoung; Berry, David; Gordon, Michael S.; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Pattle, Kate; Eden, David; McGehee, Peregrine M.; Wang, Ke; Ristorcelli, I.; Graves, Sarah F.; Alina, Dana; Lacaille, Kevin M.; Montier, Ludovic; Park, Geumsook; Kwon, Woojin; Chung, Eun Jung; Pelkonen, Veli-Matti; Micelotta, Elisabetta R.; Saajasto, Mika; Fuller, Gary (2019)
    We present the B-fields mapped in IRDC G34.43+0.24 using 850 mu m polarized dust emission observed with the POL-2 instrument at the James Clerk Maxwell telescope. We examine the magnetic field geometries and strengths in the northern, central, and southern regions of the filament. The overall field geometry is ordered and aligned closely perpendicular to the filament's main axis, particularly in regions containing the central clumps MM1 and MM2, whereas MM3 in the north has field orientations aligned with its major axis. The overall field orientations are uniform at large (POL-2 at 14 '' and SHARP at 10 '') to small scales (TADPOL at 2 ''.5 and SMA at 1 ''.5) in the MM1 and MM2 regions. SHARP/CSO observations in MM3 at 350 mu m from Tang et al. show a similar trend as seen in our POL-2 observations. TADPOL observations demonstrate a well-defined field geometry in MM1/MM2 consistent with MHD simulations of accreting filaments. We obtained a plane-of-sky magnetic field strength of 470 +/- 190 mu G, 100 +/- 40 mu G, and 60 +/- 34 mu G in the central, northern, and southern regions of G34, respectively, using the updated Davis-Chandrasekhar-Fermi relation. The estimated value of field strength, combined with column density and velocity dispersion values available in the literature, suggests G34 to be marginally critical with criticality parameter lambda values 0.8 +/- 0.4, 1.1 +/- 0.8, and 0.9 +/- 0.5 in the central, northern, and southern regions, respectively. The turbulent motions in G34 are sub-AlfvEnic with Alfvenic Mach numbers of 0.34 +/- 0.13, 0.53 +/- 0.30, and 0.49 +/- 0.26 in the three regions. The observed aligned B-fields in G34.43+0.24 are consistent with theoretical models suggesting that B-fields play an important role in guiding the contraction of the cloud driven by gravity.
  • Deshev, Boris; Haines, Christopher; Hwang, Ho Seong; Finoguenov, Alexis; Taylor, Rhys; Orlitova, Ivana; Einasto, Maret; Ziegler, Bodo (2020)
    Aims. We qualitatively assess and map the relative contribution of pre-processing and cluster related processes to the build-up of A963, a massive cluster at z=0.2 showing an unusually high fraction of star forming galaxies in its interior.Methods. We use Voronoi binning of positions of cluster members on the plane of the sky in order to map the 2D variations of galaxy properties in the centre and infall region of A963. We map four galaxy parameters (fraction of star forming galaxies, specific star formation rate, HI deficiency and age of the stellar population) based on full SED fitting, 21 cm imaging and optical spectroscopy.Results. We find an extended region dominated by passive galaxies along a north-south axis crossing the cluster centre, possibly associated with known filaments of the large-scale structure. There are signs that the passive galaxies in this region were quenched long before their arrival in the vicinity of the cluster. Contrary to that, to the east and west of the cluster centre lie regions of recent accretion dominated by gas rich, actively star forming galaxies not associated with any substructure or filament. The few passive galaxies in this region appear to be recently quenched, and some gas rich galaxies show signs of ongoing ram-pressure stripping. We report the first tentative observations at 21 cm of ongoing ram-pressure stripping at z=0.2, as well as observed inflow of low-entropy gas into the cluster along filaments of the large-scale structure.Conclusions. The observed galaxy content of A963 is a result of strongly anisotropic accretion of galaxies with different properties. Gas rich, star forming galaxies are being accreted from the east and west of the cluster and these galaxies are being quenched at r<R-200, likely by ram-pressure stripping. The bulk of the accretion onto the cluster, containing multiple groups, happens along the north-south axis and brings mostly passive galaxies, likely quenched before entering A963.