Browsing by Subject "STOMATAL RESPONSE"

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  • Cui, Fuqiang; Wu, Hongpo; Safronov, Omid; Zhang, Panpan; Kumar, Rajeev; Kollist, Hannes; Salojärvi, Jarkko Tapani; Panstruga, Ralph; Overmyer, Kirk Loren (2018)
    The atmospheric pollutant ozone (O-3) is a strong oxidant that causes extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, has significant ecological relevance, and is used here as a non-invasive ROS inducer to study plant signalling. Previous genetic screens identified several mutants exhibiting enhanced O-3 sensitivity, but few with enhanced tolerance. We found that loss-of-function mutants in Arabidopsis MLO2, a gene implicated in susceptibility to powdery mildew disease, exhibit enhanced dose-dependent tolerance to O-3 and extracellular ROS, but a normal response to intracellular ROS. This phenotype is increased in a mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 triple mutant, reminiscent of the genetic redundancy of MLO genes in powdery mildew resistance. Stomatal assays revealed that enhanced O-3 tolerance in mlo2 mutants is not caused by altered stomatal conductance. We explored modulation of the mlo2-associated O-3 tolerance, powdery mildew resistance, and early senescence phenotypes by genetic epistasis analysis, involving mutants with known effects on ROS sensitivity or antifungal defence. Mining of publicly accessible microarray data suggests that these MLO proteins regulate accumulation of abiotic stress response transcripts, and transcript accumulation of MLO2 itself is O-3 responsive. In summary, our data reveal MLO2 as a novel negative regulator in plant ROS responses, which links biotic and abiotic stress response pathways.
  • Grossiord, Charlotte; Sevanto, Sanna; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Meir, Patrick; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Pangle, Robert E.; Pockman, William T.; Salmon, Yann; Zweifel, Roman; McDowell, Nate G. (2018)
    Tree transpiration depends on biotic and abiotic factors that might change in the future, including precipitation and soil moisture status. Although short-term sap flux responses to soil moisture and evaporative demand have been the subject of attention before, the relative sensitivity of sap flux to these two factors under long-term changes in soil moisture conditions has rarely been determined experimentally. We tested how long-term artificial change in soil moisture affects the sensitivity of tree-level sap flux to daily atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and soil moisture variations, and the generality of these effects across forest types and environments using four manipulative sites in mature forests. Exposure to relatively long-term (two to six years) soil moisture reduction decreases tree sap flux sensitivity to daily VPD and relative extractable water (REW) variations, leading to lower sap flux even under high soil moisture and optimal VPD. Inversely, trees subjected to long-term irrigation showed a significant increase in their sensitivity to daily VPD and REW, but only at the most water-limited site. The ratio between the relative change in soil moisture manipulation and the relative change in sap flux sensitivity to VPD and REW variations was similar across sites suggesting common adjustment mechanisms to long-term soil moisture status across environments for evergreen tree species. Overall, our results show that long-term changes in soil water availability, and subsequent adjustments to these novel conditions, could play a critical and increasingly important role in controlling forest water use in the future.
  • Kollist, Hannes; Zandalinas, Sara I.; Sengupta, Soham; Nuhkat, Maris; Kangasjarvi, Jaakko; Mittler, Ron (2019)
    Plants grow and reproduce within a highly dynamic environment that can see abrupt changes in conditions, such as light intensity, temperature, humidity, or interactions with biotic agents. Recent studies revealed that plants can respond within seconds to some of these conditions, engaging many different metabolic and molecular networks, as well as rapidly altering their stomatal aperture. Some of these rapid responses were further shown to propagate throughout the entire plant via waves of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca2+ that are possibly mediated through the plant vascular system. Here, we propose that the integration of these signals is mediated through pulses of gene expression that are coordinated throughout the plant in a systemic manner by the ROS/Ca+2 waves.