Browsing by Subject "STRAW"

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  • Kinnunen, Niko; Laurén, Annamari (Ari); Pumpanen, Jukka; Nieminen, Tiina M.; Palviainen, Marjo (2021)
    A 96-h laboratory experiment was conducted to assess the potential of biochar as a water protection tool for acid sulfate soil runoff. Acid sulfate soils pose a risk to water bodies due to acid, metal-rich runoff, especially in drained peatland forests. New water protection methods, such as adsorption with biochar, are needed. We investigated the capability of spruce and birch biochar to adsorb metals and reduce acidity in the water. Water from an acid sulfate site was stirred with biochar, biochar with lime, and biochar with ash. We determined water Al, S, Fe, Cu, Co, Cd, Ni, and Zn concentrations periodically, as well as pH and total organic carbon at the beginning and the end of the experiment. The studied substances are considered the most abundant and environmentally harmful elements in the acid sulfate soils in Finland. Biochar surface characteristics were analyzed with FTIR spectroscopy. Concentration changes were used to parametrize adsorption kinetics models. Biochar adsorbed metals and increased pH, but lime and ash additives did not always improve the adsorption. Spruce biochar and ash addition had generally higher adsorption than birch biochar and lime addition. The adsorption was dominated by Al and Fe at lower pH, while increasing pH improved the adsorption of Cd and Zn. The results show that biochar can increase the water pH, as well as adsorb Al, Fe, Co, Cd, Ni, and Zn. Further work could include an actual-scale biochar reactor in a laboratory and field conditions.
  • Valros, Anna; Pedersen, Lene Juul; Pöytäkangas, Merja; Jensen, Margit Bak (2017)
    There are very few studies on the need to perform exploratory behaviour of sows around farrowing and during lactation, except for during the nest-building period. Exploratory behaviour in pigs may reflect appetitive foraging motivated by hunger, or appetitive behaviour related to other motivations, such as nest building. However, exploration may also be motivated by curiosity, stimulated by novelty or search for novelty. The aim of this study was to test novel methods of evaluating exploratory motivation in sows around farrowing and during lactation. We used ten second or third parity sows, housed in conventional crates from day 8 before expected farrowing until weaning, on day 28 after farrowing. Motivation to perform exploratory behaviour was evaluated by measuring the use of a manipulable and chewable object (a wooden device, MCO) and responses during a novel object test (NO). In addition, we studied if exploratory motivation is related to the energy status of the sow, measured as sow weight change during lactation, piglet weight gain, and leptin level in saliva. The exploratory motivation of sows appeared to change during the period of study. Although all sows used the MCO, the use was very low throughout the study (below 3 g per day on average), and almost non-existent during the first weeks after farrowing. The latency to touch the object in the NO test was correlated between test days before and after farrowing, while the sow showed more interest in the object before than after farrowing. MCO use during the last week of lactation was higher in sows with a lower weight after weaning, suggesting a link between explorative motivation and energy status in the sow. These results indicate a need for further studies on how to best meet the possible exploratory need of sows during their time in the farrowing room.
  • Mattila, Hans Kristian; Kačar, Dina; Mali, Tuulia Leena Elina; Lundell, Taina Kristina (2018)
    The Polyporales phlebioid white rot fungus Phlebia radiata is efficient in decomposing the wood main components, and in producing ethanol from lignocelluloses and waste materials. Based to these qualifications, the fungus was adopted for design of a consolidated bioprocess method to convert wood waste materials into ethanol without pretreatments. Higher ethanol yield was aimed by introducing collaborative fungal cultivations including isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, other yeasts, and a brown rot fungus. Various waste lignocellulose materials such as wheat and barley straw, recycled wood-fiber based core board, recycled construction waste wood, spruce saw dust, and birch wood were applied to represent wood and non-wood waste lignocellulose of different origin, chemical content and structure. In solid-state single cultivations with the white rot fungus P. radiata, both core board and barley straw turned out as suitable substrates for the consolidated bioprocess. Up to 32.4 ± 4.5 g/L of ethanol accumulated in the solid-state core board cultivation in 30 days whereas with barley straw, 7.0 ± 0.01 g/L of ethanol was obtained. Similar concentrations of ethanol were produced in increased-volume and higher gravity bioreactor cultivations without chemical, physical or enzymatic pretreatment. In all, our consolidated method adopting a white rot fungus is a promising and economic alternative for second generation bioethanol production from waste and residual lignocelluloses.