Browsing by Subject "STRENGTH"

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  • Stape, Thiago Henrique Scarabello; Seseogullari-Dirihan, Roda; Tjäderhane, Leo; Abunas, Gabriel; Marcondes Martins, Luis Roberto; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu (2018)
    In dentistry, the wet-bonding approach relies on water to maintain demineralized collagen expanded for proper resin infiltration; nevertheless, hydrolytic instability of the resin-dentin interface is inevitable with current bonding techniques. Considering dimethyl sulfoxide's (DMSO) ability to "biomodify" collagen and precipitate enzymes, the aim was to test whether the use of DMSO would permit adequate resin bonding to H3PO4-etched dehydrated dentin and assess its impact on collagen degradation by host-derived enzymes. Etched dentin surfaces from extracted sound human molars were randomly bonded in wet or dry conditions using aqueous or ethanolic DMSO solutions as pretreatments and bonding resins with or without DMSO. Bonded teeth were sectioned into resin-dentin slabs for confocal in situ zymography and beams for microtensile bond strength test. Demineralized powdered dentin was incubated in the tested DMSO -media and a hydroxyproline assay evaluated dissolution of collagen peptides. Zymography was performed on protein extracts obtained from dry and wet H3PO4-ecthed dentin powder treated with the DMSO- media. The correlative biochemical analysis demonstrated that reduction of water content during dentin hybridization by the innovative dry-bonding approaches with DMSO is effective to inactivate host-derived MMP-2 and MMP-9 and thus reduce collagen degradation while simultaneously optimizing resin-dentin bonding.
  • Ajdary, Rubina; Huan, Siqi; Zanjanizadeh Ezazi, Nazanin; Xiang, Wenchao; Grande, Rafael; Santos, Hélder A.; Rojas, Orlando J. (2019)
    Nanocellulose has been demonstrated as a suitable material for cell culturing, given its similarity to extracellular matrices. Taking advantage of the shear thinning behavior, nanocellulose suits three-dimensional (3D) printing into scaffolds that support cell attachment and proliferation. Here, we propose aqueous suspensions of acetylated nanocellulose of a low degree of substitution for direct ink writing (DM). This benefits from the heterogeneous acetylation of precursor cellulosic fibers, which eases their deconstruction and confers the characteristics required for extrusion in DIW. Accordingly, the morphology of related 3D printed architectures and their performance during drying and rewetting as well as interactions with living cells are compared with those produced from typical unmodified and TEMPO-oxidized nanocelluloses. We find that a significantly lower concentration of acetylated nanofibrils is needed to obtain bioinks of similar performance, affording more porous structures. Together with their high surface charge and axial aspect, acetylated nanocellulose produces dimensionally stable monolithic scaffolds that support drying and rewetting, required for packaging and sterilization. Considering their potential uses in cardiac devices, we discuss the interactions of the scaffolds with cardiac myoblast cells. Attachment, proliferation, and viability for 21 days are demonstrated. Overall, the performance of acetylated nanocellulose bioinks opens the possibility for reliable and scaleup fabrication of scaffolds appropriate for studies on cellular processes and for tissue engineering.
  • Kulmala, Juha-Pekka; Korhonen, Marko T.; Ruggiero, Luca; Kuitunen, Sami; Suominen, Harri; Heinonen, Ari; Mikkola, Aki; Avela, Janne (2020)
    Age-related reduction in muscle force generation capacity is similarly evident across different lower limb muscle groups, yet decline in locomotor performance with age has been shown to depend primarily on reduced ankle extensor muscle function. To better understand why ageing has the largest detrimental effect on ankle joint function during locomotion, we examined maximal ankle and knee extensor force development during a two-leg hopping test in older and young men, and used these forces as a reference to calculate relative operating efforts for the knee and ankle extensors as participants walked, ran and sprinted. We found that, across locomotion modes in both age groups, ankle extensors operated at a greater relative effort compared to knee extensors; however, slightly less pronounced differences between ankle and knee extensor muscle efforts were present among older men, mainly due to a reduction in the ankle extensor force generation during locomotion modes. We consider these findings as evidence that reduced ankle push-off function in older age is driven by a tendency to keep ankle extensor effort during locomotion lower than it would otherwise be, which, in turn, may be an important self-optimisation strategy to prevent locomotor-induced fatigue of ankle extensor muscles.
  • Bjorkman, Mikko P.; Pitkala, Kaisu H.; Jyvakorpi, Satu; Strandberg, Timo E.; Tilvis, Reijo S. (2019)
    Objectives: To assess the prognostic significance of various characteristics and measurements of sarcopenia and physical functioning on all-cause mortality among home-dwelling older people with or at-risk of sarcopenia. Design: Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Setting: Porvoo sarcopenia trial in open care. Participants: Community-dwelling people aged 75 and older (N = 428, of which 182 were re-examined at one year) with four years of follow-up. Measurements: Body mass index (BMI), physical functioning (physical component of the RAND-36) and physical performance tests (Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB)), hand grip strength, walking speed, Charlson Comorbity Index, bioimpedance-based surrogates for muscle mass: Single Frequency Skeletal Muscle Index (SF-SMI), and Calf Intracellular Resistance Skeletal Muscle Index (CRi-SMI). Date of death was retrieved from central registers. Survival analyses were performed using Life-Table analyses and Cox models. Results: Most test variables (except BMI) were associated with four-year mortality in a dose-dependent fashion. After controlling for age, gender and co-morbidity, physical performance and functioning (both SPPB and RAND36), muscle strength (hand grip strength) and CRi-SMI appeared to be independent mortality risk indicators (p <0.001) whereas SF-SMI was not. When CRi-SMI values were grouped by gender-specific cut-off points, the probability of surviving for four years decreased by 66% among the older people with low CRi-SMI (HR = 0.34, 95%CI 0.15-0.78, p = 0.011). When low CRi-SMI was further controlled for SPPB, the prognostic significance remained significant (HR = 0.55, 95%CI 0.33-0.92, p = 0.021). After controlling for age, gender, comorbidity, and CRi-SMI, the physical component of the RAND-36 (p = 0.007), SPPB (p <0,001) and hand grip strength (p = 0.009) remained significant mortality predictors. Twelve-month changes were similarly associated with allcause mortality during the follow-up period. Conclusion: CRi-SMI, muscle strength, physical performance and physical functioning are each strong independent predictors of all-cause mortality among home-dwelling older people. Compared to these indicators, BMI seemed to be clearly inferior. Of two bioimpedance-based muscle indices, CRi SMI was better predictor of mortality than SF-SMI. In this regard, muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance are all suitable targets for the prevention of sarcopenia-related over-mortality.
  • Juonala, Markus; Pitkänen, Niina; Tolonen, Sanna; Laaksonen, Marika; Sievänen, Harri; Jokinen, Eero; Laitinen, Tomi; Sabin, Matthew A.; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Taittonen, Leena; Jula, Antti; Loo, Britt-Marie; Impivaara, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Magnussen, Costan G.; Viikari, Jorma S. A.; Raitakari, Olli T. (2019)
    Context: Passive smoke exposure has been linked to the risk of osteoporosis in adults. Objective: We examined the independent effects of childhood passive smoke exposure on adult bone health. Design/Setting: Longitudinal, the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Participants: The study cohort included 1422 individuals followed for 28 years since baseline in 1980 (age 3 to 18 years). Exposure to passive smoking was determined in childhood. In adulthood, peripheral bone traits were assessed with peripheral quantitative CT (pQCT) at the tibia and radius, and calcaneal mineral density was estimated with quantitative ultrasound. Fracture data were gathered by questionnaires. Results: Parental smoking in childhood was associated with lower pQCT-derived bone sum index in adulthood (beta +/- SE, -0.064 +/- 0.023 per smoking parent; P= 0.004) in multivariate models adjusted for age, sex, active smoking, body mass index, serum 25-OH vitamin D concentration, physical activity, and parental socioeconomic position. Similarly, parental smoking was associated with lower heel ultrasound estimated bone mineral density in adulthood (beta +/- SE, -0.097 +/- 0.041 per smoking parent; P = 0.02). Parental smoking was also associated with the incidence of low-energy fractures (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.62). Individuals with elevated cotinine levels (3 to 20 ng/mL) in childhood had lower bone sum index with pQCT (beta +/- SE, -0.206 +/- 0.057; P = 0.0003). Children whose parents smoked and had high cotinine levels (3 to 20 ng/mL) had significantly lower pQCT-derived bone sum index compared with those with smoking parents but had low cotinine levels ( Conclusions and Relevance: Children of parents who smoke have evidence of impaired bone health in adulthood.
  • Caetano-Lopes, Joana; Nery, Ana M.; Canhao, Helena; Duarte, Joana; Cascao, Rita; Rodrigues, Ana; Perpetuo, Ines P.; Abdulghani, Saba; Amaral, Pedro M.; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Konttinen, Yrjo T.; Graca, Luis; Vaz, Maria F.; Fonseca, Joao E. (2010)
  • Valadbeigi, Younes; Kurten, Theo (2019)
    HClO4 is an important catalyst in organic chemistry, and also acts as a reservoir or sink species in atmospheric chlorine chemistry. In this study, we computationally investigate the interactions of Bronsted (H2SO4, HClO4, HNO3) and Lewis acids (BH3, BF3, BCl3, BBr3, B(OH)(3)) with HClO4 using the omega B97xD method and the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. Different isomers of clusters with up to 4 molecules (tetramer) were optimized, and the most stable structures were determined. The enthalpies, Delta H, and Gibbs free energies, Delta G, of cluster formation were calculated in the gas phase at 298 K. Atoms in molecules (AIM) calculations find B-O bond critical points only in the (BH3)(n)HClO4 clusters, while formation of other clusters was based on hydrogen bonding interactions. (H2SO4)HClO4 and (B(OH)(3))HClO4, with formation enthalpies of -14.1 and -12.0 kcal mol(-1), were the most stable, and (BCl3)HClO4 with a formation enthalpy of -2.9 kcal mol(-1), was the least stable cluster among the dimers. Clustering of the Lewis and Bronsted acids with HClO4 enhanced its acidity, so that clustering of four HClO4 molecules and formation of (HClO4)(4) increases the acidity of HClO4 by about 35 kcal mol(-1). The most acidic dimer cluster found in the study was (BBr3)HClO4, with Delta H-acid of 275 kcal mol(-1); 26 kcal mol(-1) stronger than that of the HClO4 monomer.
  • Tanaka, Atsushi; Khakalo, Alexey; Hauru, Lauri; Korpela, Antti; Orelma, Hannes (2018)
    In this study, we investigate the “chemical welding” of paper with the ionic liquid (IL) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM]OAc) using a two-step process. First, the IL is transported into the structure of the paper as a water solution. Then, partial dissolution is achieved by activation with heat (80–95 °C), where the water evaporates and the surfaces of the fibres partially dissolve. The activated paper is washed with water to remove IL, and dried to fuse fibre surfaces into each other. The “chemically welded” paper structure has both elevated dry and wet strength. The treatment conditions can be adjusted to produce both paper-like materials and films. The most severe treatment conditions produce films that are fully transparent and their oxygen and grease barrier properties are excellent. As an all-cellulose material, the “chemically welded” paper is fully biodegradable and is a potential alternative to fossil fuel-based plastics.
  • Uutela, Toini I.; Kautiainen, Hannu J.; Häkkinen, Arja H. (2018)
    Objectives Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation has a detrimental effect on muscle strength. Our objective was to analyse the association between muscle performance and different disease activity levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Method A total of 199 consecutive outpatients were subject to cross-sectional assessment. Measurements of grip strength, endurance of the upper and lower limbs and trunk strength were combined as a muscle performance composite score (MPCS), using a standardised method. The disease activity for 28 joints (DAS28), radiographs of small joints (Larsen score), rheumatoid factor, body mass index (BMI), comorbidities and anti-rheumatic drugs were verified. Patients questionnaires included sociodemographic information, pain level, global disease activity, the Beck Depression Inventory, the mental and physical component scores of Short Form-36 and physical activity level. Results Of the 199 patients, 36%, 17% and 47% patients had remission, low/moderate and high DAS28, respectively. The patients in remission had significantly shorter disease duration, better parameters in terms of pain, physicians assessment, Larsen, Beck or physical component score of Short Form-36, and they were more physically active than other patients. After adjustments for age, sex, RA duration, radiographs and BMI, the decreasing MPCS associated linearly with the increasing DAS28 activity levels (linearity, P Conclusion Poorer MPCS is clearly associated with higher disease activity in patients with RA. Muscle performance is a modifiable risk factor. The findings suggest evaluating muscle performance in clinical practice as a part of patient care.
  • Scarabello Stape, Thiago Henrique; Tjaderhane, Leo; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Fujiwara Yanikian, Cristiane Rumi; Szesz, Anna Luiza; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Marcondes Martins, Luis Roberto (2016)
    Objective. This study evaluated a new approach, named dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-wet bonding, to produce more desirable long-term prospects for the ultrafine interactions between synthetic polymeric biomaterials and the inherently hydrated dentin substrate. Methods. Sound third molars were randomly restored with/without DMSO pretreatment using a total-etch (Scocthbond Multipurpose: SBMP) and a self-etch (Clearfil SE Bond: CF) adhesive systems. Restored teeth (n = 10)/group were sectioned into sticks and submitted to different analyses: micro-Raman determined the degree of conversion inside the hybrid layer (DC); resin dentin microtensile bond strength and fracture pattern analysis at 24 h, 1 year and 2 years of aging; and nanoleakage evaluation at 24h and 2 years. Results. DMSO-wet bonding produced significantly higher 24 h bond strengths for SBMP that were sustained over the two-year period, with significantly less adhesive failures. Similarly, DMSO-treated CF samples presented significantly higher bond strength than untreated samples at two years. Both adhesives had significant less adhesive failures at 2 years with DMSO. DMSO had no effect on DC of SBMP, but significantly increased the DC of CE DMSO-treated SBMP samples presented reduced silver uptake compared to untreated samples after aging. Significance. Biomodification of the dentin substrate by the proposed strategy using DMSO is a suitable approach to produce more durable hybrid layers with superior ability to withstand hydrolytic degradation over time. Although the active role of DMSO on dentin bond improvement may vary according to monomer composition, its use seems to be effective on both self-etch and etch-and-rinse bonding mechanisms. (C) 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Rontu, Ville; Nolvi, Anton; Hokkanen, Ari; Haeggström, Edward; Kassamakov, Ivan; Franssila, Sami (2018)
    We have investigated elastic and fracture properties of amorphous Al2O3 thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with bulge test technique using a free-standing thin film membrane and extended applicability of bulge test technique. Elastic modulus was determined to be 115 GPa for a 50 nm thick film and 170 GPa for a 15 nm thick film. Residual stress was 142 MPa in the 50 nm Al2O3 film while it was 116 MPa in the 15 nm Al2O3 film. Density was 3.11 g cm(-3) for the 50 nm film and 3.28 g cm(-3) for the 15 nm film. Fracture strength at 100 hPa s(-1) pressure ramp rate was 1.72 GPa for the 50 nm film while for the 15 nm film it was 4.21 GPa, almost 2.5-fold. Fracture strength was observed to be positively strain-rate dependent. Weibull moduli of these films were very high being around 50. The effective volume of a circular film in bulge test was determined from a FEM model enabling future comparison of fracture strength data between different techniques.
  • Lu, Eryang; Zhao, Junlei; Makkonen, Ilja; Mizohata, Kenichiro; Li, Zhiming; Hua, Mengyuan; Djurabekova, Flyura; Tuomisto, Filip (2021)
    We present evidence of homogenization of atomic diffusion properties caused by C and N interstitials in an equiatomic single-phase high entropy alloy (FeMnNiCoCr). This phenomenon is manifested by an unexpected interstitial-induced reduction and narrowing of the directly experimentally determined migration barrier distribution of mono-vacancy defects introduced by particle irradiation. Our observation by positron annihilation spectroscopy is explained by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations that predict preferential localization of C/N interstitials in regions rich in Mn and Cr, leading to a narrowing and reduction of the mono-vacancy size distribution in the random alloy. This phenomenon is likely to have a significant impact on the mechanical behavior under irradiation, as the local variations in elemental motion have a profound effect on the solute strengthening in high entropy alloys. (C) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Acta Materialia Inc.
  • Laakkonen, Eija K.; Soliymani, Rabah; Karvinen, Sira; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kujala, Urho M.; Baumann, Marc; Sipilä, Sarianna; Kovanen, Vuokko; Lalowski, Maciej (2017)
    Female middle age is characterized by a decline in skeletal muscle mass and performance, predisposing women to sarcopenia, functional limitations, and metabolic dysfunction as they age. Menopausal loss of ovarian function leading to low circulating level of 17-estradiol has been suggested as a contributing factor to aging-related muscle deterioration. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown and thus far androgens have been considered as a major anabolic hormone for skeletal muscle. We utilized muscle samples from 24 pre- and postmenopausal women to establish proteome-wide profiles, associated with the difference in age (30-34 years old vs. 54-62 years old), menopausal status (premenopausal vs. postmenopausal), and use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT; user vs. nonuser). None of the premenopausal women used hormonal medication while the postmenopausal women were monozygotic (MZ) cotwin pairs of whom the other sister was current HRT user or the other had never used HRT. Label-free proteomic analyses resulted in the quantification of 797 muscle proteins of which 145 proteins were for the first time associated with female aging using proteomics. Furthermore, we identified 17-estradiol as a potential upstream regulator of the observed differences in muscle energy pathways. These findings pinpoint the underlying molecular mechanisms of the metabolic dysfunction accruing upon menopause, thus having implications for understanding the complex functional interactions between female reproductive hormones and health.
  • Pitkälä, Kaisu; Raivio, Minna M.; Laakkonen, Marja-Liisa; Tilvis, Reijo S.; Kautiainen, Hannu; Strandberg, Timo E. (2010)
  • Silventoinen, Karri; Maia, José; Jelenkovic, Aline; Pereira, Sara; Gouveia, Élvio; Antunes, António; Thomis, Martine; Lefevre, Johan; Kaprio, Jaakko; Freitas, Duarte (2021)
    Objectives To analyze the influence of genetic and environmental factors on the variation in somatotype, physical fitness, and their mutual associations. Methods Twins from 214 pairs (87 monozygotic) of the Autonomous Region of Madeira, Portugal, from 3 to 18 years of age (51% girls) were assessed in anthropometry and physical fitness tests. We estimated endomorphy, mesomorphy, and ectomorphy based on anthropometric measures and physical fitness using the Eurofit test battery. Two age categories were analyzed: children (3-11 years) and adolescents (12-18 years). Genetic and environmental variations were estimated using quantitative genetic twin modeling. Results No genetic sex differences were found, thus boys and girls were pooled in all genetic analyses. Heritability estimates were high for somatotype (a(2)= 0.80-0.93), physical fitness traits (a(2)= 0.67-0.83), and largely similar in children and adolescents. Positive correlations were found for ectomorphy with motor ability and cardiorespiratory endurance as well as for endomorphy and mesomorphy with muscular strength (r= 0.25-0.37). In contrast, negative associations were found for ectomorphy with muscular strength, as well as for endomorphy and mesomorphy with motor ability and cardiorespiratory endurance (-0.46 to -0.26). Twin modeling indicated that these associations were explained mostly by genetic factors in common to the two associated traits (84% or more). Conclusions Associations between somatotype and physical fitness tests are mainly explained by common genetic background in children and adolescents. Therefore, interventions in youth should consider that a child's performance in physical fitness tests partly reflects their inherited physique.
  • Boraska, Vesna; Day-Williams, Aaron; Franklin, Christopher S.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Albrecht, Eva; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beilin, Lawrence J.; Bochud, Murielle; Cadby, Gemma; Ernst, Florian; Evans, David M.; Hayward, Caroline; Hicks, Andrew A.; Huffman, Jennifer; Huth, Cornelia; James, Alan L.; Klopp, Norman; Kolcic, Ivana; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Musk, Arthur W.; Pehlic, Marina; Pennell, Craig E.; Perry, John R. B.; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; St Pourcain, Beate; Ring, Susan M.; Salvi, Erika; Schipf, Sabine; Staessen, Jan A.; Teumer, Alexander; Timpson, Nicholas; Vitart, Veronique; Warrington, Nicole M.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; An, Ping; Anttila, Verneri; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Holmen, Jostein; Ntalla, Ioanna; Palotie, Aarno; Pietiläinen, Kirsi Hannele; Wedenoja, Juho; Winsvold, Bendik S.; Dedoussis, George V.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Province, Michael A.; Zwart, John-Anker; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Cusi, Daniele; Smith, George Davey; Frayling, Timothy M.; Gieger, Christian; Palmer, Lyle J.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rudan, Igor; Voelzke, Henry; Wichmann, H. Erich; Wright, Alan F.; Zeggini, Eleftheria (2012)
  • Tanner, Timo; Antikainen, Osmo; Ehlers, Henrik; Yliruusi, Jouko (2017)
    With modern tableting machines large amounts of tablets are produced with high output. Consequently, methods to examine powder compression in a high-velocity setting are in demand. In the present study, a novel gravitation-based method was developed to examine powder compression. A steel bar is dropped on a punch to compress microcrystalline cellulose and starch samples inside the die. The distance of the bar is being read by a high-accuracy laser displacement sensor which provides a reliable distance-time plot for the bar movement. In-die height and density of the compact can be seen directly from this data, which can be examined further to obtain information on velocity, acceleration and energy distribution during compression. The energy consumed in compact formation could also be seen. Despite the high vertical compression speed, the method was proven to be cost-efficient, accurate and reproducible. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Moreau, Juulia-Gabrielle; Kohout, Tomas; Wünnemann, Kai (2018)
    We studied shock-darkening in ordinary chondrites by observing the propagation of shock waves and melting through mixtures of metals and iron sulfides. We used the shock physics code iSALE at the mesoscale to simulate shock compression of modeled ordinary chondrites (using olivine, iron and troilite). We introduced FeS-FeNi eutectic properties and partial melting in a series of chosen configurations of iron and troilite grains mixtures in a sample plate. We observed, at a nominal pressure of 45 GPa, partial melting of troilite in all models. Only few of the models showed partial melting of iron (a phase difficult to melt in shock heating) due to the eutectic properties of the mixtures. Iron melting only occurred in models presenting either strong shock wave concentration effects or effects of heating by pore crushing, for which we provided more details. Further effects are discussed such as the frictional heating between iron and troilite and the heat diffusion in scenarios with strongly heated troilite. We also characterized troilite melting in the 32-60 GPa nominal pressure range. We concluded that specific dispositions of the iron and troilite grains in mixtures exist that lead to melting of iron and explain why it is possible to find a mix of metals and iron sulfides in shock-darkened ordinary chondrites.
  • Kiuru, O.; Sinervo, J.; Vähänikkilä, H.; Anttonen, V.; Tjäderhane, L. (2021)
    Objectives. Resin-dentin bond strength decreases over time. This reduction is related to the loss of hybrid layer integrity. Collagenolytic enzymes, especially matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), are responsible for the degradation of the collagen matrix of the hybrid layer. Various MMP inhibitors with the ability to prevent enzymatic degradation have been identified. This study aimed to systematically review the literature for studies which evaluated the effect of MMP inhibitors on the immediate and aged dentin bond strengths. Study SelectionScreening and analysis were carried out by two reviewers. Two databases were searched, and from a total of 740 articles, 43 were accepted for full review. 21 articles with 0.2%-2% chlorhexidine (CHX) treatments were included for meta-analysis. A risk of bias assessment was performed on all studies chosen for meta-analysis. A variety of MMP inhibitors have been studied, CHX being the most widely used. Conclusions. A clear trend for a lower loss of dentin bond strength was observed with different MMP inhibitors. In meta-analysis, no significant difference was seen between the CHX and control in the immediate bond strengths. Bond strengths in the CHX group were significantly higher than the control group after aging (P
  • Vienna, University; Renk, Oliver; Ghosh, Sanyukta; Mallik, Ramesh Chandra; Grytsiv, Andriy; Bursik, Jiri; Schafler, Erhard; Tuomisto, Filip; Bauer, Ernst; Rogl, Peter Franz (2021)
    The influence of shear strain on the microstructural, physical, and mechanical properties was studied on large bulk samples (diameter: 30 mm, thickness: 1 or 8 mm), which were consolidated by high-pressure torsion (HPT) from a commercial powder DD0.7Fe3CoSb12. Particularly, the thick sample (mass similar to 53 g) allowed measuring the thermoelectric (TE) properties with respect to various orientations of the specimen in the sample. All data were compared with those of a hot-pressed (HP) reference sample, prepared with the same powder. Transmission electron microscopy, as well as X-ray powder diffraction profile analyses, Hall measurements, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, supported these investigations. Furthermore, synchrotron data for the temperature range from 300 to 825 K were used to evaluate the changes in the grain size and dislocation density as well as the thermal expansion coefficient via the change in the lattice parameter during heating. In addition, hardness and direct thermal expansion measurements of the HPT samples were performed and compared with the HP reference sample's values. With the increase of the shear strain from the center to the rim of the sample, the electrical resistivity becomes higher, whereas the thermal conductivity becomes lower, but the Seebeck coefficient remained almost unchanged. For the thin as well as thick samples, the enhanced electrical resistivity was balanced out by a decreased thermal conductivity such that the maximum ZT values (ZT = 1.3-1.35 at 856 K) do not vary much as a function of the shear strain throughout the sample, however, all ZTs are higher than that of the HP sample. The thermal-electric conversion efficiencies are in the range of 14-15% (for 423-823 K). With similar high ZT values for the n-type skutterudites, fabricated in the same fast and sustainable way, these p- and n-type skutterudites may serve as legs for TE generators, directly cut from the big HPT bulks.