Browsing by Subject "STRIATUM"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-6 of 6
  • Orjatsalo, Maija; Partinen, Eemil; Wallukat, Gerd; Alakuijala, Anniina; Partinen, Markku (2021)
    Study objectives: Narcolepsy type 1 is a rare hypersomnia of central origin, which is caused by loss of hypothalamic neurons that produce the neuropeptides hypocretin-1 and -2. Hypocretin-containing nerve terminals are found in areas known to play a central role in autonomic control and in pain signaling. Cholinergic M2 receptors are found in brain areas involved with the occurrence of hallucinations and cataplexy. In addition to classical symptoms of narcolepsy, the patients suffer frequently from autonomic dysfunction, chronic pain, and hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations. We aimed to test whether narcolepsy type 1 patients have autoantibodies against autonomic beta 2 adrenergic receptor, M2 muscarinic receptors, or nociception receptors. Methods: We tested the serum of ten narcolepsy type 1 patients (five female) for activating beta 2 adrenergic receptor autoantibodies, M2 muscarinic receptor autoantibodies, and nociception receptor autoantibodies. Results: Ten of ten patients were positive for muscarinic M2 receptor autoantibodies (P <0.001), 9/10 were positive for autoantibodies against nociception receptors (P <0.001), and 5/10 were positive for beta 2 adrenergic receptor autoantibodies (P <0.001). Conclusions: Narcolepsy type 1 patients harbored activating autoantibodies against M2 muscarinic receptors, nociception receptors, and beta 2 adrenergic receptors. M2 receptor autoantibodies may be related to the occurrence of cataplexy and, moreover, hallucinations in narcolepsy since they are found in the same brain areas that are involved with these symptoms. The occurrence of nociception receptor autoantibodies strengthens the association between narcolepsy type 1 and pain. The connection between narcolepsy type 1, autonomic complaints, and the presumed cardiovascular morbidity might be associated with the occurrence of beta 2 adrenergic receptor autoantibodies. On the other hand, the presence of the autoantibodies may be secondary to the destruction of the hypocretin pathways. (C) 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Leino, Sakari; Koski, Sini K.; Hänninen, Raisa; Tapanainen, Tuukka; Rannanpää, Saara; Salminen, Outi (2018)
    Preclinical studies suggest the involvement of various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC). We studied for the first time the effects of alpha 5 nicotinic receptor subunit gene deletion on motor behavior and neurodegeneration in mouse models of Parkinson's disease and levodopa-induced dyskinesia. Unilateral dopaminergic lesions were induced in wild-type and alpha 5-KO mice by 6-hydroxydopamine injections into the striatum or the medial forebrain bundle. Subsequently, rotational behavior induced by dopaminergic drugs was measured. A subset of animals received chronic treatments with levodopa and nicotine to assess levodopa-induced dyskinesia and antidyskinetic effects by nicotine. SNC lesion extent was assessed with tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry and stereological cell counting. Effects of alpha 5 gene deletion on the dopaminergic system were investigated by measuring ex vivo striatal dopamine transporter function and protein expression, dopamine and metabolite tissue concentrations and dopamine receptor mRNA expression. Hemiparkinsonian alpha 5-KO mice exhibited attenuated rotational behavior after amphetamine injection and attenuated levodopa-induced dyskinesia. In the intrastriatal lesion model, dopaminergic cell loss in the medial cluster of the SNC was less severe in alpha 5-KO mice. Decreased striatal dopamine uptake in alpha 5-KO animals suggested reduced dopamine transporter function as a mechanism of attenuated neurotoxicity. Nicotine reduced dyskinesia severity in wild-type but not alpha 5-KO mice. The attenuated dopaminergic neurodegeneration and motor dysfunction observed in hemiparkinsonian alpha 5KO mice suggests potential for alpha 5 subunit-containing nicotinic receptors as a novel target in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. (C) 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
  • Heininen, Juho; Julku, Ulrika; Myöhänen, Timo; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto (2021)
    We developed a new multiplexed reversed phase liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method. The method is based on isobaric labeling with a tandem mass tag (TMT10-plex) and stable isotope-labeled internal standards, and was used to analyze amino acids in mouse brain microdialysis samples. The TMT10-plex labeling of amino acids allowed analysis of ten samples in one LC-MS/MS run, significantly increasing the sample throughput. The method provides good chromatographic performance (peak half-width between 0.04-0.12 min), allowing separation of all TMTlabeled amino acids with acceptable resolution and high sensitivity (limits of detection typically around 10 nM). The use of stable isotope-labeled internal standards, together with TMT10-plex labeling, ensured good repeatability (relative standard deviation 0.994), indicating good quantitative performance of the multiplexed method. The method was applied to study the effect of d-amphetamine microdialysis perfusion on amino acid concentrations in the mouse brain. All amino acids were reliably detected and quantified, indicating that the method is sensitive enough to detect low concentrations of amino acids in brain microdialysis samples. (c) 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ )
  • McWilliams, Thomas; Barini, Erica; Pohjolan-Pirhonen, Risto; Brooks, Simon P.; Singh, François; Burel, Sophie; Balk, Kristin; Kumar, Atul; Montava-Garriga, Lambert; Prescott, Alan R.; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Mouton-Liger, François; Ball, Graeme; Hills, Rachel; Knebel, Axel; Ulusoy, Ayse; Di Monte, Donato A.; Tamjar, Jevgenia; Antico, Odetta; Fears, Kyle; Smith, Laura; Brambilla, Riccardo; Palin, Eino; Valori, Miko; Eerola-Rautio, Johanna; Tienari, Pentti; Corti, Olga; Dunnett, Stephen B.; Ganley, Ian G.; Suomalainen, Anu; Muqit, Miratul M.K. (2018)
    Mutations in PINK1 and Parkin result in autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). Cell culture and in vitro studies have elaborated the PINK1-dependent regulation of Parkin and defined how this dyad orchestrates the elimination of damaged mitochondria via mitophagy. PINK1 phosphorylates ubiquitin at serine 65 (Ser65) and Parkin at an equivalent Ser65 residue located within its N-terminal ubiquitin-like domain, resulting in activation; however, the physiological significance of Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation in vivo in mammals remains unknown. To address this, we generated a Parkin Ser65Ala (S65A) knock-in mouse model. We observe endogenous Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation and activation in mature primary neurons following mitochondrial depolarization and reveal this is disrupted in ParkinS65A/S65A neurons. Phenotypically, ParkinS65A/S65A mice exhibit selective motor dysfunction in the absence of any overt neurodegeneration or alterations in nigrostriatal mitophagy. The clinical relevance of our findings is substantiated by the discovery of homozygous PARKIN (PARK2) p.S65N mutations in two unrelated patients with PD. Moreover, biochemical and structural analysis demonstrates that the ParkinS65N/S65N mutant is pathogenic and cannot be activated by PINK1. Our findings highlight the central role of Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation in health and disease.
  • Julku, Ulrika H.; Panhelainen, Anne E.; Tiilikainen, Saija E.; Svarcbahs, Reinis; Tammimäki, Anne E.; Piepponen, T. Petteri; Savolainen, Mari H.; Myöhänen, Timo T. (2018)
    Alpha-synuclein is the main component of Lewy bodies, a histopathological finding of Parkinson's disease. Prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP) is a serine protease that binds to alpha-synuclein and accelerates its aggregation in vitro. PREP enzyme inhibitors have been shown to block the alpha-synuclein aggregation process in vitro and in cellular models, and also to enhance the clearance of alpha-synuclein aggregates in transgenic mouse models. Moreover, PREP inhibitors have induced alterations in dopamine and metabolite levels, and dopamine transporter immunoreactivity in the nigrostriatal tissue. In this study, we characterized the role of PREP in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic and GABAergic systems of wild-type C57Bl/6 and PREP knockout mice, and the effects of PREP overexpression on these systems. Extracellular concentrations of dopamine and protein levels of phosphorylated dopamine transporter were increased and dopamine reuptake was decreased in the striatum of PREP knockout mice, suggesting increased internalization of dopamine transporter from the presynaptic membrane. Furthermore, PREP overexpression increased the level of dopamine transporters in the nigrostriatal tissue but decreased phosphorylated dopamine transporters in the striatum in wild-type mice. Our results suggest that PREP regulates the function of dopamine transporter, possibly by controlling the phosphorylation and transport of dopamine transporter into the striatum or synaptic membrane.
  • Zhurakovskaya, Ekaterina; Leikas, Juuso; Pirttimaki, Tiina; Mon, Francesc Casas; Gynther, Mikko; Aliev, Rubin; Rantamaki, Tomi; Tanila, Heikki; Forsberg, Markus M.; Gröhn, Olli; Paasonen, Jaakko; Jalkanen, Aaro J. (2019)
    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the gradual degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, leading to striatal dopamine depletion. A partial unilateral striatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion causes 40-60% dopamine depletion in the lesioned rat striatum, modeling the early stage of PD. In this study, we explored the connectivity between the brain regions in partially 6-OHDA lesioned male Wistar rats under urethane anesthesia using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 5 weeks after the 6-OHDA infusion. Under urethane anesthesia, the brain fluctuates between the two states, resembling rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM sleep states. We observed clear urethane-induced sleep-like states in 8/19 lesioned animals and 8/18 control animals. 6-OHDA lesioned animals exhibited significantly lower functional connectivity between the brain regions. However, we observed these differences only during the REM-like sleep state, suggesting the involvement of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway in REM sleep regulation. Corticocortical and corticostriatal connections were decreased in both hemispheres, reflecting the global effect of the lesion. Overall, this study describes a promising model to study PD-related sleep disorders in rats using fMRI.