Browsing by Subject "SUBSTANCE USE"

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  • Kinnunen, Jaana M.; Lindfors, Pirjo; Rimpela, Arja; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Rathmann, Katharina; Perelman, Julian; Federico, Bruno; Richter, Matthias; Kunst, Anton E.; Lorant, Vincent (2016)
    It is well established that poor academic performance is related to smoking, but the association between academic well-being and smoking is less known. We measured academic well-being by school burnout and schoolwork engagement and studied their associations with smoking among 14- to 17-year-old schoolchildren in Belgium, Germany, Finland, Italy, the Netherlands, and Portugal. A classroom survey (2013 SILNE survey, N = 11,015) was conducted using the Short School Burnout Inventory and the Schoolwork Engagement Inventory. Logistic regression, generalized linear mixed models, and ANOVA were used. Low schoolwork engagement and high school burnout increased the odds for daily smoking in all countries. Academic performance was correlated with school burnout and schoolwork engagement, and adjusting for it slightly decreased the odds for smoking. Adjusting for socioeconomic factors and school level had little effect. Although high school burnout and low schoolwork engagement correlate with low academic performance, they are mutually independent risk factors for smoking. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents.
  • Mustonen, Antti; Alakokkare, Anni-Emilia; Salom, Caroline; Hurtig, Tuula; Levola, Jonna; Scott, James G.; Miettunen, Jouko; Niemelä, Solja (2021)
    Objective: Early onset of alcohol use is associated with an increased risk of substance use disorders (SUD), but few studies have examined associations with other psychiatric disorders. Our aim was to study the association between the age of first alcohol intoxication (AFI) and the risk of psychiatric disorders in a Finnish general population sample. Methods: We utilized a prospective, general population-based study, the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. In all, 6,290 15?16-year old adolescents answered questions on AFI and were followed up until the age of 33 years for psychiatric disorders (any psychiatric disorder, psychosis, SUD, mood disorders and anxiety disorders) by using nationwide register linkage data. Cox-regression analysis with Hazard Ratios (HR, with 95% confidence intervals (CI)) was used to assess the risk of psychiatric disorders associated with AFI. Results: Statistically significant associations were observed between AFI and any psychiatric disorder, psychosis, SUDs, and mood disorders. After adjustments for other substance use, family structure, sex and parental psychiatric disorders, AFIs of 13?14 years and
  • Malanchini, Margherita; Smith-Woolley, Emily; Ayorech, Ziada; Rimfeld, Kaili; Krapohl, Eva; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Korhonen, Tellervo; Bartels, Meike; van Beijsterveldt, Toos C. E. M.; Rose, Richard J.; Lundstrom, Sebastian; Anckarsater, Henrik; Kaprio, Jaakko; Lichtenstein, Paul; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Plomin, Robert (2019)
    Background Maternal smoking during pregnancy (MSDP) has been linked to offspring's externalizing problems. It has been argued that socio-demographic factors (e.g. maternal age and education), co-occurring environmental risk factors, or pleiotropic genetic effects may account for the association between MSDP and later outcomes. This study provides a comprehensive investigation of the association between MSDP and a single harmonized component of externalizing: aggressive behaviour, measured throughout childhood and adolescence. Methods Data came from four prospective twin cohorts - Twins Early Development Study, Netherlands Twin Register, Childhood and Adolescent Twin Study of Sweden, and FinnTwin12 study - who collaborate in the EU-ACTION consortium. Data from 30 708 unrelated individuals were analysed. Based on item level data, a harmonized measure of aggression was created at ages 9-10; 12; 14-15 and 16-18. Results MSDP predicted aggression in childhood and adolescence. A meta-analysis across the four samples found the independent effect of MSDP to be 0.4% (r = 0.066), this remained consistent when analyses were performed separately by sex. All other perinatal factors combined explained 1.1% of the variance in aggression across all ages and samples (r = 0.112). Paternal smoking and aggressive parenting strategies did not account for the MSDP-aggression association, consistent with the hypothesis of a small direct link between MSDP and aggression. Conclusions Perinatal factors, including MSDP, account for a small portion of the variance in aggression in childhood and adolescence. Later experiences may play a greater role in shaping adolescents' aggressive behaviour.
  • Hakulinen, Christian; Jokela, Markus (2019)
    Background. Personality has been associated with alcohol use, but less is known about how alcohol use may influence long-term personality trait change. Methods. The present study examines associations between alcohol use and change in the five major personality traits across two measurement occasions (mean follow-up of 5.6 years). A total of 39 722 participants (54% women) were pooled from six cohort studies for an individual-participant meta-analysis. Alcohol use was measured as (1) average alcohol consumption, (2) frequency of binge drinking, (3) symptoms of alcohol use disorder, and (4) a global indicator of risky alcohol use. Changes in the five major personality traits (extraversion, emotional stability, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness to experience) were used as outcomes. Results. Risky alcohol use was associated with increasing extraversion [0.25 T-scores over the mean follow-up of 5.6 years; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07-0.44] and decreasing emotional stability (-0.28; 95% CI -0.48 to -0.08), agreeableness (-0.67; 95% CI -0.87 to -0.36), and conscientiousness (-0.58; 95% CI -0.79 to -0.38). Except the association between alcohol use and extraversion, these associations were consistent across cohort studies and across different measures of alcohol use. Conclusions. These findings suggest that alcohol use is associated with personality trait changes in adulthood.
  • Bauer, Michael; Glenn, Tasha; Alda, Martin; Andreassen, Ole A.; Angelopoulos, Elias; Ardau, Raffaella; Ayhan, Yavuz; Baethge, Christopher; Bauer, Rita; Baune, Bernhard T.; Becerra-Palars, Claudia; Bellivier, Frank; Belmaker, Robert H.; Berk, Michael; Bersudsky, Yuly; Bicakci, Sule; Birabwa-Oketcho, Harriet; Bjella, Thomas D.; Cabrera, Jorge; Cheung, Eric Y. Wo; Del Zompo, Maria; Dodd, Seetal; Donix, Markus; Etain, Bruno; Fagiolini, Andrea; Fountoulakis, Kostas N.; Frye, Mark A.; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Gottlieb, John F.; Grof, Paul; Harima, Hirohiko; Henry, Chantal; Isometsä, Erkki T.; Janno, Sven; Kapczinski, Flavio; Kardell, Mathias; Khaldi, Slim; Kliwicki, Sebastian; Konig, Barbara; Kot, Timur L.; Krogh, Rikke; Kunz, Mauricio; Lafer, Beny; Landen, Mikael; Larsen, Erik R.; Lewitzka, Ute; Licht, Rasmus W.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; MacQueen, Glenda; Manchia, Mirko; Marsh, Wendy; Martinez-Cengotitabengoa, Monica; Melle, Ingrid; Meza-Urzua, Fatima; Ming, Mok Yee; Monteith, Scott; Morken, Gunnar; Mosca, Enrica; Mozzhegorova, Anton A.; Munoz, Rodrigo; Mythri, Starlin V.; Nacef, Fethi; Nadella, Ravi K.; Nery, Fabiano G.; Nielsen, Rene E.; O'Donovan, Claire; Omrani, Adel; Osher, Yamima; Sorensen, Helle Ostermark; Ouali, Uta; Ruiz, Yolanda Pica; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Pinna, Marco; da Ponte, Francisco D. R.; Quiroz, Danilo; Ramesar, Raj; Rasgon, Natalie; Reddy, M. S.; Reif, Andreas; Ritter, Philipp; Rybakowski, Janusz K.; Sagduyu, Kemal; Raghuraman, Bharathram Sathur; Scippa, Angela M.; Severus, Emanuel; Simhandl, Christian; Stackhouse, Paul W.; Stein, Dan J.; Strejilevich, Sergio; Subramaniam, Mythily; Sulaiman, Ahmad Hatim; Suominen, Kirsi; Tagata, Hiromi; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Tondo, Leonardo; Torrent, Carla; Vaaler, Arne E.; Vares, Edgar; Veeh, Julia; Vieta, Eduard; Viswanath, Biju; Yoldi-Negrete, Maria; Zetina, Mark; Zgueb, Yosra; Whybrow, Peter C. (2019)
    In many international studies, rates of completed suicide and suicide attempts have a seasonal pattern that peaks in spring or summer. This exploratory study investigated the association between solar insolation and a history of suicide attempt in patients with bipolar I disorder. Solar insolation is the amount of electromagnetic energy from the Sun striking a surface area on Earth. Data were collected previously from 5536 patients with bipolar I disorder at 50 collection sites in 32 countries at a wide range of latitudes in both hemispheres. Suicide related data were available for 3365 patients from 310 onset locations in 51 countries. 1047 (31.1%) had a history of suicide attempt. There was a significant inverse association between a history of suicide attempt and the ratio of mean winter solar insolation/mean summer solar insolation. This ratio is smallest near the poles where the winter insolation is very small compared to the summer insolation. This ratio is largest near the equator where there is relatively little variation in the insolation over the year. Other variables in the model that were positively associated with suicide attempt were being female, a history of alcohol or substance abuse, and being in a younger birth cohort. Living in a country with a state-sponsored religion decreased the association. (All estimated coefficients p <0.01). In summary, living in locations with large changes in solar insolation between winter and summer may be associated with increased suicide attempts in patients with bipolar disorder. Further investigation of the impacts of solar insolation on the course of bipolar disorder is needed.
  • Castren, Sari; Grainger, Marjut; Lahti, Tuuli; Alho, Hannu; Salonen, Anne H. (2015)
    Background: Adolescent gambling and substance use are viewed as a public health concern internationally. The early onset age of gambling is a known risk factor for developing gambling problems later in life. The aims of this study are: to evaluate the internal consistency reliability, factorial validity and classification accuracy of the Finnish version of DSM-IV-Multiple Response-Juvenile (DSM-IV-MR-J) criteria measuring at-risk/problem gambling (ARPG); to examine gender differences in gambling participation, ARPG and substance use among first-year junior high school students; and to investigate the association of gambling and gaming (video game playing) participation, substance use and social variables with ARPG. Methods: This study examined 988 adolescents (mean age 13.4 years) at 11 public schools in Finland between October-December 2013. The response rate was 91.6%. Chi-squared test and binary logistic regression analysis were used. Results: 'Illegal acts' was the most endorsed and sensitive, but the least specific criteria identifying ARPG. During the past year, 51.6% of the respondents had gambled, 7.9% were identified as at-risk/problem gamblers (DSM-IV-MR-J score >= 2), 8.0% had smoked and 8.9% had been drinking for intoxication, and the first three were significantly more common among boys than girls. The odds ratio of being a male past-year at-risk/problem gambler was 2.27, 5.78 for gambling often or sometimes, 2.42 for video game playing weekly or more often and 6.23 for having peer gamblers. Conclusions: Overall, the Finnish version of the DSM-IV-MR-J had acceptable internal consistency reliability and factorial validity. None of the DSM-IV-MR-J criteria were accurate enough to screen ARPG per se. ARPG past-year prevalence was relatively high with males gambling more than females. ARPG was as common as drinking alcohol for intoxication and smoking. Peer gambling was strongly associated with ARPG. Efficient strategies to minimise the risks of gambling problems, tools for prevention and identification of ARPG among the underage are needed.
  • Czajkowski, Nikolai; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Torvik, Fartein Ask; Ystrom, Eivind; Rosenstrom, Tom; Gillespie, Nathan A.; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted (2021)
    Public Health Significance Both the amount of caffeine people consume and their response to caffeine is heritable. A modest proportion of the genetic influences underlying caffeine use and response is shared with personality and personality disorder traits. Our main aim was to estimate the extent of overlapping etiology between caffeine consumption and response and normative and pathological personality. Linear mixed-effects models were used to identify normative personality domains and personality disorder (PD) traits for inclusion in multivariate twin analyses together with individual caffeine related measures. Data were obtained from Norwegian adult twins in a face-to-face interview conducted in 1999-2004 as part of a population-based study of mental health and through self-report in 2010-2011 and 2015-2017. Personality disorder data was available for 2,793 twins, normative personality for 3,889 twins, and caffeine for 3,862 twins (mean age 43.0 years). Normative personality was assessed using the self-reported Big Five Inventory, PD traits were assessed by the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality, and caffeine consumption, toxicity, tolerance, and withdrawal were assessed through a self-report questionnaire developed at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Caffeine measures were found to be moderately heritable, h(2) = 30.1%-45.0%. All normative personality domains and four PD traits, antisocial, borderline, dependent and paranoid, were significantly associated with at least one caffeine variable. A small proportion of variance in caffeine consumption was attributable to genetic factors shared with normative personality (1.3%) and personality disorders (11.4%). A modest proportion of variance in caffeine tolerance and toxicity was attributable to genetic factors shared with both normative personality (26.9%, 24.8%) and personality disorders (21.0%, 36.0%). The present study found caffeine consumption and response to be heritable and provides evidence that a small to-modest proportion of this genetic etiology is shared with both normative and pathological personality.
  • Heikkinen, Noora; Kärkkäinen, Olli; Laukkanen, Eila; Kekkonen, Virve; Kaarre, Outi; Kivimäki, Petri; Könönen, Mervi; Velagapudi, Vidya; Nandania, Jatin; Lehto, Soili M.; Niskanen, Eini; Vanninen, Ritva; Tolmunen, Tommi (2019)
    Our aim was to analyze metabolite profile changes in serum associated with moderate-to-heavy consumption of alcohol in young adults and to evaluate whether these changes are connected to reduced brain gray matter volumes. These study population consisted of young adults with a 10-year history of moderate-to-heavy alcohol consumption (n = 35) and light-drinking controls (n = 27). We used the targeted liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method to measure concentrations of metabolites in serum, and 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging to assess brain gray matter volumes. Alterations in amino acid and energy metabolism were observed in the moderate-to-heavy drinking young adults when compared to the controls. After correction for multiple testing, the group of moderate-to-heavy drinking young adults had increased serum concentrations of 1-methylhistamine (p = 0.001, d = 0.82) when compared to the controls. Furthermore, concentrations of 1-methylhistamine (r = 0.48, p = 0.004) and creatine (r = 0.52, p = 0.001) were negatively correlated with the brain gray matter volumes in the females. Overall, our results show association between moderate-to-heavy use of alcohol and altered metabolite profile in young adults as well as suggesting that some of these changes could be associated with the reduced brain gray matter volume. (C) 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Congdon, Eliza; Service, Susan; Wessman, Jaana; Seppanen, Jouni K.; Schönauer, Stefan; Miettunen, Jouko; Turunen, Hannu; Koiranen, Markku; Joukamaa, Matti; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Palotie, Leena; Veijola, Juha; Mannila, Heikki; Paunio, Tiina; Freimer, Nelson B. (2012)
  • Korhonen, Tellervo; Sihvola, Elina; Latvala, Antti; Dick, Danielle M.; Pulkkinen, Lea; Nurnberger, John; Rose, Richard J.; Kaprio, Jaakko (2018)
    Background: Developmental relationships between tobacco use and suicide-related behaviors (SRB) remain unclear. Our objective was to investigate the longitudinal associations of tobacco use in adolescence and SRB in adulthood. Methods: Using a prospective design, we examined whether tobacco use in adolescence is associated with SRB (intentional self-injury, suicide ideation) in young adulthood in a population-based sample of 1330 twins (626 males, 704 females). The baseline and follow-up data were collected by professionally administered semi-structured poly-diagnostic interviews at ages 14 and 22, respectively. Results: After adjusting for multiple potential confounders, those who reported early-onset of regular tobacco use had a significantly increased risk for intentional self-injury, such as cutting or burning, at age 22 (adjusted odds ratio[AOR] 4.57, 95% CI 1.93-10.8) in comparison to those who had not at all initiated tobacco use. Also, daily cigarette smoking at baseline was associated with future intentional self-injury (AOR 4.45, 95% CI 2.04-9.70). Early-onset tobacco use was associated with suicidal ideation in females (AOR 3.69, 95% CI 1.56-8.72) but not in males. Considering any SRB, baseline daily smokers (AOR 2.13, 95% CI 1.12-4.07) and females with early onset of regular tobacco use (AOR 3.97, 95% CI 1.73-9.13) had an increased likelihood. Within-family analyses among twin pairs discordant for exposure and outcome controlling for familial confounds showed similar, albeit statistically non-significant, associations. Conclusion: Early-onset tobacco use in adolescence is longitudinally associated with SRB (intentional self-injury and/or suicide ideation) in young adulthood, particularly among females. Further investigation may reveal whether this association has implications for prevention of SRB in adolescence and young adulthood.
  • Pascale, Angela; Stephenson, Mallory; Barr, Peter; Latvala, Antti; Aaltonen, Sari; Piirtola, Maarit; Viken, Richard; Rose, Richard J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Maes, Hermine; Dick, Danielle M.; Salvatore, Jessica E. (2022)
    Background We sought to clarify the impact of adolescent alcohol misuse on adult physical health and subjective well-being. To do so, we investigated both the direct associations between adolescent alcohol misuse and early midlife physical health and life satisfaction and the indirect effects on these outcomes attributable to subsequent alcohol problems. Method The sample included 2733 twin pairs (32% monozygotic; 52% female) from the FinnTwin16 study. Adolescent alcohol misuse was a composite of frequency of drunkenness, frequency of alcohol use, and alcohol problems at ages 16, 17, and 18.5. The early midlife outcomes included somatic symptoms, self-rated health, and life satisfaction at age 34. The mediators examined as part of the indirect effect analyses included alcohol problems from the Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index at ages 24 and 34. Serial mediation and co-twin comparison models were applied and included covariates from adolescence and early midlife. Results There were weak direct associations between adolescent alcohol misuse and early midlife physical health and life satisfaction. However, there was stronger evidence for indirect effects, whereby young adult and early midlife alcohol problems serially mediated the relationship between adolescent alcohol misuse and early midlife somatic symptoms (beta = 0.03, 95% CI [0.03, 0.04]), self-rated health (beta = -0.02, 95% CI [-0.03, -0.01]), and life satisfaction (beta = -0.03, CI [-0.04, -0.02]). These serial mediation effects were robust in co-twin comparison analyses. Conclusions These results provide evidence that alcohol problems are a primary driver linking adolescent alcohol misuse and poor health outcomes across the lifespan.
  • Askola, Riitta; Louheranta, Olavi; Seppänen, Allan (2022)
    International variability and shifting trends in forensic psychiatry lead to gaps in national service provision and needs for service development. This study explores these needs through the subjective narratives of those involved in Finnish forensic services, either as forensic psychiatric patients, their parents, or service providers. Data was gathered by means of thematic interview and subjected to thematic analysis. Three main themes emerged: (1) pre-treatment challenges, (2) institutional/treatment-related concerns about therapeutic security and (3) adapting and recovery. The research highlights the need to develop forensic psychiatric services at three levels. First, it calls for increased risk awareness and risk assessment skills at the general psychiatric level. Second, it emphasizes the need for increased therapeutic engagement throughout the rehabilitative process. Third, it calls for structured and meaningful post-discharge aftercare. At all three levels, gradated security-aware standardization and patient triage in forensic services would help to develop and maintain an intact care pathway. This would decrease offending, marginalization, and suffering. Only then can we begin to meet the requirements of the WHO European Mental Health Action Plan. These findings can contribute to the development of international, standardized treatment models for clinical forensic psychiatric practices.
  • 23andMe Res Team; Subst Use Disorders Working Grp Ps; Int Cannabis Consortium (2018)
    Cannabis use is a heritable trait that has been associated with adverse mental health outcomes. In the largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) for lifetime cannabis use to date (N = 184,765), we identified eight genome-wide significant independent single nucleotide polymorphisms in six regions. All measured genetic variants combined explained 11% of the variance. Gene-based tests revealed 35 significant genes in 16 regions, and S-PrediXcan analyses showed that 21 genes had different expression levels for cannabis users versus nonusers. The strongest finding across the different analyses was CADM2, which has been associated with substance use and risk-taking. Significant genetic correlations were found with 14 of 25 tested sub-stance use and mental health-related traits, including smoking, alcohol use, schizophrenia and risk-taking. Mendelian randomization analysis showed evidence for a causal positive influence of schizophrenia risk on cannabis use. Overall, our study provides new insights into the etiology of cannabis use and its relation with mental health.
  • Taylor, Amy E.; Fluharty, Meg E.; Bjorngaard, Johan H.; Gabrielsen, Maiken Elvestad; Skorpen, Frank; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Campbell, Archie; Engmann, Jorgen; Mirza, Saira Saeed; Loukola, Anu; Laatikainen, Tiina; Partonen, Timo; Kaakinen, Marika; Ducci, Francesca; Cavadino, Alana; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N.; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Jacobsen, Rikke Kart; Skaaby, Tea; Ebstrup, Jeanette Frost; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Minica, Camelia C.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Dale, Caroline E.; Amuzu, Antoinette; Lennon, Lucy T.; Lahti, Jari; Palotie, Aarno; Räikkönen, Katri; Wong, Andrew; Paternoster, Lavinia; Wong, Angelita Pui-Yee; Horwood, L. John; Murphy, Michael; Johnstone, Elaine C.; Kennedy, Martin A.; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomas; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Nohr, Ellen A.; Kuh, Diana; Kivimaki, Mika; Eriksson, Johan G.; Morris, Richard W.; Casas, Juan P.; Preisig, Martin; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Linneberg, Allan; Power, Chris; Hypponen, Elina; Veijola, Juha; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Korhonen, Tellervo; Tiemeier, Henning; Kumari, Meena; Porteous, David J.; Hayward, Caroline; Romundstad, Pal R.; Smith, George Davey; Munafo, Marcus R. (2014)
  • Paljarvi, Tapio; Martikainen, Pekka; Pensola, Tiina; Leinonen, Taina; Herttua, Kimmo; Makela, Pia (2015)
    Background Long-term employment trajectories of young problem drinkers are poorly understood. Methods We constructed retrospective labour market participation histories at ages 18-34 of 64 342 persons born in 1969-1982. Beginning from the year of each subject's 18th birthday, we extracted information from the records of Statistics Finland on educational attainment, main type of economic activity, months in employment, and months in unemployment for a minimum of seven years (range 7-16 years). We used information on the timing of alcohol-related hospitalizations and deaths in the same period to define problem drinkers with early onset limited course, early onset persistent course, and late onset problem drinking. Results Early onset limited course problem drinkers improved their employment considerably by age, whereas early onset persistent problem drinkers experienced a constant decline in their employment by age. From the age of 18 to 34, early onset persistent problem drinkers were in employment merely 12% of the time, in comparison with 39% among the early onset limited course problem drinkers, and 58% among the general population. Conclusions These results indicate that young adults who were retrospectively defined as having early onset persistent course problem drinking were extensively marginalized from the labour market early on during their life course, and that their employment trajectory was significantly worse compared to other problem drinkers.
  • Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Lankinen, Vilma; Marttunen, Mauri; Lindberg, Nina; Frojd, Sari (2016)
    Overweight is reportedly a risk factor for being bullied, and body image may mediate this association. Research on associations between overweight and bullying has so far only focused on children and early adolescents. We explored associations between actual and perceived overweight at age 15 and involvement in bullying at ages 15 and 17. A total of 2070 Finnish adolescents responded to a survey at ages 15 and 17. Self-reported weight and height, perceived weight and involvement in bullying were elicited. Being overweight at age 15 was not associated with being bullied or with being a bully at age 15 or 17. Perceived overweight among girls was associated with subsequent involvement in bullying as a bully and in feeling shunned. Weight related bullying may decrease from pre- and early adolescence to middle adolescence. The associations between perceived overweight and self-identification as a bully, and those between perceived overweight and feeling isolated may be explained by the phenomena representing psychological dysfunction. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Barr, Peter B.; Kuo, Sally I-Chun; Aliev, Fazil; Latvala, Antti; Viken, Richard; Rose, Richard J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Salvatore, Jessica E.; Dick, Danielle M. (2019)
    Background and Aims Previous twin research suggests relationship status can moderate underlying genetic liability towards alcohol misuse. This paper examined: (1) whether genome-wide polygenic scores (GPS) for alcohol consumption are associated with alcohol misuse; (2) whether these GPS are moderated by romantic relationships (gene-environment interaction; G x E) and (3) whether G x E results are consistent across sex. Design Linear mixed-effects models were used to test associations between genome-wide polygenic scores, relationship status and alcohol use/misuse. Setting Finnish twins born between 1983 and 1987 identified through Finland's central population registry. Participants An intensively studied subset of Finnish Twin Study (FinnTwin12) during the young adult phase (aged 20-26 years). The analytical sample includes those with complete interview and genetic data (n = 1201). Measurements Key measurements included involvement in a romantic partnership, drinking frequency, intoxication frequency and DSM-IV alcohol dependence (AD) symptoms. Genome-wide polygenic scores (GPS) were created from available summary statistics from a large genome-wide association study (GWAS) of drinks per week. Results GPS predicted drinking frequency [b = 0.109; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.050, 0.168], intoxication frequency (b = 0.111; 95% CI = 0.054, 0.168) and AD symptoms (b = 0.123; 95% CI = 0.064, 0.182). Having a romantic relationship negatively influenced the association between GPS and drinking frequency (b = -0.105; 95% CI = -0.211, -0.001), intoxication frequency (b = -0.118; 95% CI = -0.220, -0.016) and AD symptoms (b = -0.119; 95% CI = -0.229, -0.009). There was a three-way interaction between sex, relationship status and GPS for intoxication frequency (b = 0.223; 95% CI = 0.013, 0.433), such that the reduced association between GPS and intoxication frequency for those in a relationship was only apparent in males. We found no evidence of three-way interactions for drinking frequency or AD symptoms. Conclusions Being in a romantic relationship reduced the association between genetic predisposition and drinking, high-risk drinking and alcohol problems. However, for high-risk drinking the protective effect was limited to males, mapping onto earlier findings suggesting that males benefit more from romantic partnerships.
  • Stephenson, Mallory; Barr, Peter; Aliev, Fazil; Ksinan, Albert; Latvala, Antti; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Viken, Richard; Rose, Richard J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Dick, Danielle; Salvatore, Jessica E. (2021)
    Co-twin comparisons address familial confounding by controlling for genetic and environmental influences that twin siblings share. We applied the co-twin comparison design to investigate associations of adolescent factors with alcohol dependence (AD) symptoms. Participants were 1286 individuals (581 complete twin pairs; 42% monozygotic; and 54% female) from the FinnTwin12 study. Predictors included adolescent academic achievement, substance use, externalizing problems, internalizing problems, executive functioning, peer environment, physical health, relationship with parents, alcohol expectancies, life events, and pubertal development. The outcome was lifetime AD clinical criterion count, as measured in young adulthood. We examined associations of each adolescent domain with AD symptoms in individual-level and co-twin comparison analyses. In individual-level analyses, adolescents with higher levels of substance use, teacher-reported externalizing problems at age 12, externalizing problems at age 14, self- and co-twin-reported internalizing problems, peer deviance, and perceived difficulty of life events reported more symptoms of AD in young adulthood (ps < .044). Conversely, individuals with higher academic achievement, social adjustment, self-rated health, and parent-child relationship quality met fewer AD clinical criteria (ps < .024). Associations between adolescent substance use, teacher-reported externalizing problems, co-twin-reported internalizing problems, peer deviance, self-rated health, and AD symptoms were of a similar magnitude in co-twin comparisons. We replicated many well-known adolescent correlates of later alcohol problems, including academic achievement, substance use, externalizing and internalizing problems, self-rated health, and features of the peer environment and parent-child relationship. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of co-twin comparisons for understanding pathways to AD. Effect sizes corresponding to the associations between adolescent substance use, teacher-reported externalizing problems, co-twin-reported internalizing problems, peer deviance, and self-rated health were not significantly attenuated (p value threshold = .05) after controlling for genetic and environmental influences that twin siblings share, highlighting these factors as candidates for further research.
  • Ranjit, Anu; Buchwald, Jadwiga; Latvala, Antti; Heikkila, Kauko; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Rose, Richard J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Korhonen, Tellervo (2019)
    Longitudinal, genetically informative studies of the association between cigarette smoking and depressive symptoms among adolescents are limited. We examined the longitudinal association of cigarette smoking with subsequent depressive symptoms during adolescence in a Finnish twin cohort. We used prospective data from the population-based FinnTwin12 study (maximum N = 4152 individuals, 1910 twin pairs). Current smoking status and a number of lifetime cigarettes smoked were assessed at the age of 14 and depressive symptoms at the age of 17. Negative binomial regression was conducted to model the association between smoking behavior and subsequent depressive symptoms among individuals, and within-pair analyses were conducted to control for unmeasured familial confounding. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, school grades, drinking alcohol to intoxication, health status, family structure, parental education, and smoking, as well as for pre-existing depressiveness. The results of the individual-level analyses showed that cigarette smoking at the age of 14 predicted depressive symptoms at the age of 17. Compared to never smokers, those who had smoked over 50 cigarettes (incidence rate ratio, IRR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.28-1.60) and regular smokers (IRR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.32-1.62) had higher depression scores. The associations were attenuated when adjusted for measured covariates and further reduced in within-pair analyses. In the within-pair results, the estimates were lower within monozygotic (MZ) pairs compared to dizygotic (DZ) pairs, suggesting that shared genetic factors contribute to the associations observed in individual-based analyses. Thus, we conclude that cigarette smoking is associated with subsequent depressive symptoms during adolescence, but the association is not independent of measured confounding factors and shared genetic influences.
  • Mazumder, Atiqul Haq; Barnett, Jennifer; Isometsä, Erkki Tapio; Lindberg, Nina; Torniainen-Holm, Minna; Lähteenvuo, Markku; Lahdensuo, Kaisla; Kerkelä, Martta; Ahola-Olli, Ari; Hietala, Jarmo; Kampman, Olli; Kieseppä, Tuula; Jukuri, Tuomas; Häkkinen, Katja; Cederlöf, Erik; Haaki, Willehard; Kajanne, Risto; Wegelius, Asko; Männynsalo, Teemu; Niemi-Pynttäri, Jussi; Suokas, Kimmo; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Tiihonen, Jari; Paunio, Tiina; Vainio, Seppo Juhani; Palotie, Aarno; Niemelä, Solja; Suvisaari, Jaana; Veijola, Juha (2021)
    The purpose of this study was to explore the association of cognition with hazardous drinking and alcohol-related disorder in persons with bipolar disorder (BD). The study population included 1268 persons from Finland with bipolar disorder. Alcohol use was assessed through hazardous drinking and alcohol-related disorder including alcohol use disorder (AUD). Hazardous drinking was screened with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for Consumption (AUDIT-C) screening tool. Alcohol-related disorder diagnoses were obtained from the national registrar data. Participants performed two computerized tasks from the Cambridge Automated Neuropsychological Test Battery (CANTAB) on A tablet computer: the 5-choice serial reaction time task, or reaction time (RT) test and the Paired Associative Learning (PAL) test. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Mental Health Inventory with five items (MHI-5). However, no assessment of current manic symptoms was available. Association between RT-test and alcohol use was analyzed with log-linear regression, and e beta with 95% confidence intervals (CI) are reported. PAL first trial memory score was analyzed with linear regression, and beta with 95% CI are reported. PAL total errors adjusted was analyzed with logistic regression and odds ratios (OR) with 95% CI are reported. After adjustment of age, education, housing status and depression, hazardous drinking was associated with lower median and less variable RT in females while AUD was associated with a poorer PAL test performance in terms of the total errors adjusted scores in females. Our findings of positive associations between alcohol use and cognition in persons with bipolar disorder are difficult to explain because of the methodological flaw of not being able to separately assess only participants in euthymic phase.