Browsing by Subject "SURFACE-CHARGE"

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  • Kontturi, Leena-Stiina; van den Dikkenberg, Joep; Urtti, Arto; Hennink, Wim E.; Mastrobattista, Enrico (2019)
    The major challenge in the therapeutic applicability of oligonucleotide-based drugs is the development of efficient and safe delivery systems. The carriers should be non-toxic and stable in vivo, but interact with the target cells and release the loaded oligonucleotides intracellularly. We approached this challenge by developing a light-triggered liposomal delivery system for oligonucleotides based on a non-cationic and thermosensitive liposome with indocyanine green (ICG) as photosensitizer. The liposomes had efficient release properties, as 90% of the encapsulated oligonucleotides were released after 1-minute light exposure. Cell studies using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-based splicing assay with HeLa cells showed light-activated transfection with up to 70%-80% efficacy. Moreover, free ICG and oligonucleotides in solution transfected cells upon light induction with similar efficacy as the liposomal system. The light-triggered delivery induced moderate cytotoxicity (25%-35% reduction in cell viability) 1-2 days after transfection, but the cell growth returned to control levels in 4 days. In conclusion, the ICG-based light-triggered delivery is a promising method for oligonucleotides, and it can be used as a platform for further optimization and development.
  • Ylösmäki, Erkko; Fusciello, Manlio; Martins, Beatriz; Feola, Sara; Hamdan, Firas; Chiaro, Jacopo; Ylösmäki, Leena; Vaughan, Matthew J.; Viitala, Tapani; Kulkarni, Prasad S.; Cerullo, Vincenzo (2021)
    Background Intratumoral BCG therapy, one of the earliest immunotherapies, can lead to infiltration of immune cells into a treated tumor. However, an increase in the number of BCG-induced tumor-specific T cells in the tumor microenvironment could lead to enhanced therapeutic effects. Methods Here, we have developed a novel cancer vaccine platform based on BCG that can broaden BCG-induced immune responses to include tumor antigens. By physically attaching tumor-specific peptides onto the mycobacterial outer membrane, we were able to induce strong systemic and intratumoral T cell-specific immune responses toward the attached tumor antigens. These therapeutic peptides can be efficiently attached to the mycobacterial outer membrane using a poly-lysine sequence N-terminally fused to the tumor-specific peptides. Results Using two mouse models of melanoma and a mouse model of colorectal cancer, we observed that the antitumor immune responses of BCG could be improved by coating the BCG with tumor-specific peptides. In addition, by combining this novel cancer vaccine platform with anti-programmed death 1 (anti-PD-1) immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) therapy, the number of responders to anti-PD-1 immunotherapy was markedly increased. Conclusions This study shows that intratumoral BCG immunotherapy can be improved by coating the bacteria with modified tumor-specific peptides. In addition, this improved BCG immunotherapy can be combined with ICI therapy to obtain enhanced tumor growth control. These results warrant clinical testing of this novel cancer vaccine platform.
  • Imlimthan, Surachet; Correia, Alexandra; Figueiredo, Patricia Isabel; Lintinen, Kalle; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Airaksinen, Anu; Kostiainen, Mauri A.; Almeida Santos, Helder; Sarparanta, Mirkka Päivikki (2020)
    Natural biopolymer nanoparticles (NPs), including nanocrystalline cellulose (CNC) and lignin, have shown potential as scaffolds for targeted drug delivery systems due to their wide availability, cost‐efficient preparation, and anticipated biocompatibility. Since both CNC and lignin can potentially cause complications in cell viability assays due to their ability to scatter the emitted light and absorb the assay reagents, we investigated the response of bioluminescent (CellTiter‐Glo®), colorimetric (MTT® and AlamarBlue®) and fluorometric (LIVE/DEAD®) assays for the determination of the biocompatibility of the multimodal CNC and lignin constructs in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages and 4T1 breast adenocarcinoma cell lines. Here, we have developed multimodal CNC and lignin NPs harboring the radiometal chelator DOTA (1,4,7,10‐tetraazacyclododecane‐1,4,7,10‐tetraacetic acid) and the fluorescent dye Cyanine 5 for the investigation of nanomaterial biodistribution in vivo with nuclear and optical imaging, which were then used as the model CNC and lignin nanosystems in the cell viability assay comparison. CellTiter‐Glo® based on the detection of ATP‐dependent luminescence in viable cells revealed to be the best assay for both nanoconstructs for its robust linear response to increasing NP concentration and lack of interference from either of the NP types. Both multimodal CNC and lignin NPs displayed low cytotoxicity and favorable interactions with the cell lines, suggesting that they are good candidates for nanosystem development for targeted drug delivery in breast cancer and for theranostic applications. Our results provide useful guidance for cell viability assay compatibility for CNC and lignin NPs and facilitate the future translation of the materials for in vivo applications.