Browsing by Subject "Screening"

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  • ERSPC Investigators; Hugosson, Jonas; Roobol, Monique J.; Mansson, Marianne; Tammela, Teuvo L. J.; Talala, Kirsi M.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas P.; Stenman, Ulf H.; Kujala, Paula; Taari, Kimmo; Auvinen, Anssi (2019)
    Background: The European Randomized study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) has previously demonstrated that prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening decreases prostate cancer (PCa) mortality. Objective: To determine whether PSA screening decreases PCa mortality for up to 16 yr and to assess results following adjustment for nonparticipation and the number of screening rounds attended. Design, setting, and participants: This multicentre population-based randomised screening trial was conducted in eight European countries. Report includes 182 160 men, followed up until 2014 (maximum of 16 yr), with a predefined core age group of 162 389 men (55-69 yr), selected from population registry. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: The outcome was PCa mortality, also assessed with adjustment for nonparticipation and the number of screening rounds attended. Results and limitations: The rate ratio of PCa mortality was 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72-0.89, p <0.001) at 16 yr. The difference in absolute PCa mortality increased from 0.14% at 13 yr to 0.18% at 16 yr. The number of men needed to be invited for screening to prevent one PCa death was 570 at 16 yr compared with 742 at 13 yr. The number needed to diagnose was reduced to 18 from 26 at 13 yr. Men with PCa detected during the first round had a higher prevalence of PSA >20 ng/ml (9.9% compared with 4.1% in the second round, p <0.001) and higher PCa mortality (hazard ratio = 1.86, p <0.001) than those detected subsequently. Conclusions: Findings corroborate earlier results that PSA screening significantly reduces PCa mortality, showing larger absolute benefit with longer follow-up and a reduction in excess incidence. Repeated screening may be important to reduce PCa mortality on a population level. Patient summary: In this report, we looked at the outcomes from prostate cancer in a large European population. We found that repeated screening reduces the risk of dying from prostate cancer. (C) 2019 Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of European Association of Urology.
  • Vaarno, Jenni; Myller, Jyri; Bachour, Adel; Koskinen, Heli; Bäck, Leif; Klockars, Tuomas; Koskinen, Anni (2020)
    Purpose We have previously demonstrated that dogs can be trained to distinguish the urine of patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) from that of healthy controls based on olfaction. Encouraged by these promising results, we wanted to investigate if a detection dog could work as a screening tool for OSA. The objective of this study was to prospectively assess the dogs' ability to identify sleep apnea in patients with OSA suspicion. Methods Urine samples were collected from 50 patients suspected of having OSA. The urine sample was classified as positive for OSA when the patient had a respiratory event index of 5/h or more. The accuracy of two trained dogs in identifying OSA was tested in a prospective blinded setting. Results Both of the dogs correctly detected approximately half of the positive and negative samples. There were no statistically significant differences in the dogs' ability to recognize more severe cases of OSA, as compared to milder cases. Conclusion According to our study, dogs cannot be used to screen for OSA in clinical settings, most likely due to the heterogenic nature of OSA.
  • Auvinen, Anssi; Rannikko, Antti; Taari, Kimmo; Kujala, Paula; Mirtti, Tuomas; Kenttämies, Anu; Rinta-Kiikka, Irina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Oksala, Niku; Pettersson, Kim; Tammela, Teuvo L. (2017)
    The current evidence of PSA-based prostate cancer screening shows a reduction in cause-specific mortality, but with substantial overdiagnosis. Recently, new developments in detection of clinically relevant prostate cancer include multiple kallikreins as biomarkers besides PSA, and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) for biopsy decision. They offer opportunities for improving the outcomes in screening, particularly reduction in overdiagnosis and higher specificity for potentially lethal cancer. A population-based randomized screening trial will be started, with 67,000 men aged 55-67 years at entry. A quarter of the men will be allocated to the intervention arm, and invited to screening. The control arm will receive no intervention. All men in the screening arm will be offered a serum PSA determination. Those with PSA of 3 ng/ml or higher will have an additional multi-kallikrein panel and those with indications of increased risk of clinically relevant prostate cancer will undergo mpMRI. Men with a malignancy-suspect finding in MRI are referred to targeted biopsies. Screening interval is 6 years for men with baseline PSA <1.5 ng/ml, 4 years with PSA 1.5-3.0 and 2 years if initial PSA > 3. The main outcome of the trial is prostate cancer mortality, with analysis at 10 and 15 years. The statistical power is sufficient for detecting a 28% reduction at 10 years and 22% at 15 years. The proposed study has the potential to provide the evidence to justify screening as a public health policy if mortality benefit can be sustained with substantially reduced overdiagnosis.
  • Liskola, Joni; Haravuori, Henna; Lindberg, Nina; Niemelä, Solja; Karlsson, Linnea; Kiviruusu, Olli; Marttunen, Mauri (2018)
    Background: The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) is commonly used in adults to screen for harmful alcohol consumption but few studies exist on its use among adolescents. Our aim was to validate the AUDIT and its derivative consumption questionnaire (AUDIT-C) as screening instruments for the detection of problem use of alcohol in adolescents. Methods: 621 adolescents (age-range, 12-19 years) were drawn from clinical and population samples who completed the AUDIT questionnaire. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed using K-SADS-PL. A rating based on the K-SADS-PL was used to assess alcohol use habits, alcohol use disorders, screening and symptom criteria questions. Screening performance of the AUDIT and AUDIT-C sum scores and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated. The diagnostic odds ratios (dOR) were calculated to express the overall discrimination between cut-offs. Results: Comparisons of ROC between the AUDIT and AUDIT-C pairs indicated a slightly better test performance by AUDIT for the whole sample and in a proportion of the subsamples. Optimal cut-off value for the AUDIT was >= 5 (sensitivity 0.931, specificity 0.772, dOR 45.22; 95% CI: 24.72-83.57) for detecting alcohol problem use. The corresponding optimal cut-off value for the AUDIT-C was >= 3 in detecting alcohol problem use (sensitivity 0.952, specificity 0.663, dOR 39.31; 95% CI: 19.46-78.97). Agreement between the AUDIT and AUDIT-C using these cut-off scores was high at 91.9%. Conclusions: Our results for the cut-off scores for the early detection of alcohol problem use in adolescents are >= 5 for AUDIT, and >= 3 for AUDIT-C.
  • Bensch, Frank; Varjonen, Elina A.; Pyhältö, Tuomo T.; Koskinen, Seppo K. (2019)
    Purpose BCVI may lead to ischemic stroke, disability, and death, while being often initially clinically silent. Screening criteria for BCVI based on clinical findings and trauma mechanism have improved detection, with Denver criteria being most common. Up to 30% of patients do not meet BCVI screening criteria. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of augmented Denver criteria on detection, and to determine the relative risk for ischemic stroke. Methods Denver screening criteria were augmented by any high-energy trauma of the cervical spine, thorax, abdomen, or pelvis. All acute blunt trauma WBCT including CT angiography (CTA) over a period of 38 months were reviewed retrospectively by two Fellowship-trained radiologists, as well as any cerebral imaging after the initial trauma. Results 1544 WBCT studies included 374 CTA (m/f = 271/103; mean age 41.5 years). Most common mechanisms of injury were MVA (51.5%) and fall from a height (22.3%). We found 72 BCVI in 56 patients (15.0%), with 13 (23.2%) multiple lesions. The ICA was affected in 49 (68.1%) and the vertebral artery in 23 (31.9%) of cases. The most common injury level was C2, with Biffl grades I and II most common in ICA, and II and IV in VA. Interobserver agreement was substantial (Kappa = 0.674). Of 215 patients imaged, 16.1% with BCVI and 1.9% of the remaining cases had cerebral ischemic stroke (p <.0001; OR = 9.77; 95% CI 3.3-28.7). Eleven percent of patients with BCVI would not have met standard screening criteria. Conclusions The increase in detection rate for BCVI justifies more liberal screening protocols.
  • Ellilä, Simo; Bromann, Paul; Nyyssönen, Mari; Itävaara, Merja; Koivula, Anu; Paulin, Lars; Kruus, Kristiina (2019)
    Xylanases are in important class of industrial enzymes that are essential for the complete hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass into fermentable sugars. In the present study, we report the cloning of novel xylanases with interesting properties from compost metagenomics libraries. Controlled composting of lignocellulosic materials was used to enrich the microbial population in lignocellulolytic organisms. DNA extracted from the compost samples was used to construct metagenomics libraries, which were screened for xylanase activity. In total, 40 clones exhibiting xylanase activity were identified and the thermostability of the discovered xylanases was assayed directly from the library clones. Five genes, including one belonging to the more rare family GH8, were selected for subcloning and the enzymes were expressed in recombinant form in E. coli. Preliminary characterization of the metagenome-derived xylanases revealed interesting properties of the novel enzymes, such as high thermostability and specific activity, and differences in hydrolysis profiles. One enzyme was found to perform better than a standard Trichoderma reesei xylanase in the hydrolysis of lignocellulose at elevated temperatures.
  • Ellilä, Simo; Bromann, Paul; Nyyssönen, Mari; Itävaara, Merja; Koivula, Anu; Paulin, Lars; Kruus, Kristiina (Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2019)
    Abstract Xylanases are in important class of industrial enzymes that are essential for the complete hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass into fermentable sugars. In the present study, we report the cloning of novel xylanases with interesting properties from compost metagenomics libraries. Controlled composting of lignocellulosic materials was used to enrich the microbial population in lignocellulolytic organisms. DNA extracted from the compost samples was used to construct metagenomics libraries, which were screened for xylanase activity. In total, 40 clones exhibiting xylanase activity were identified and the thermostability of the discovered xylanases was assayed directly from the library clones. Five genes, including one belonging to the more rare family GH8, were selected for subcloning and the enzymes were expressed in recombinant form in E. coli. Preliminary characterization of the metagenome-derived xylanases revealed interesting properties of the novel enzymes, such as high thermostability and specific activity, and differences in hydrolysis profiles. One enzyme was found to perform better than a standard Trichoderma reesei xylanase in the hydrolysis of lignocellulose at elevated temperatures.
  • Mueller, Janis A.; Harms, Mirja; Schubert, Axel; Mayer, Benjamin; Jansen, Stephanie; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe; Michel, Detlef; Mertens, Thomas; Vapalahti, Olli; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Muench, Jan (2017)
    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen that causes congenital infections which may result in birth defects, such as microcephaly. Currently, no approved treatment or vaccination is available. ZIKV can be readily detected in cell culture where virally infected cells are normally stained by specific antibodies. As ZIKV regularly causes a cytopathic effect, we were wondering whether this viral property can be used to quantitatively determine viral infectivity. We here describe the use of an 3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide-(MTT)-based cell viability assay that allows to determine ZIKV-induced cell death. We show that this colorimetric assay quantifies ZIKV infection over a broad range of viral dilutions in both monkey and human cells. It allows to determine inhibitory activities of antivirals that block ZIKV or to define the neutralizing antibody titers of ZIKV antisera. This MTT-based ZIKV detection assay can be evaluated by naked eye or computational tools, has a broad linear range, does not require large equipment or costly reagents, and thus represents a promising alternative to antibody-based assays, in particular in resource-poor settings. We propose to use this simple, fast, and cheap method for quantification of ZIKV neutralizing antibodies and testing of antiviral compounds.
  • Steele, Catriona M.; Mukherjee, Rajat; Kortelainen, Juha M.; Polonen, Harri; Jedwab, Michael; Brady, Susan L.; Theimer, Kayla Brinkman; Langmore, Susan; Riquelme, Luis F.; Swigert, Nancy B.; Bath, Philip M.; Goldstein, Larry B.; Hughes, Richard L.; Leifer, Dana; Lees, Kennedy R.; Meretoja, Atte; Muehlemann, Natalia (2019)
    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is prevalent in several at-risk populations, including post-stroke patients, patients in intensive care and the elderly. Dysphagia contributes to longer hospital stays and poor outcomes, including pneumonia. Early identification of dysphagia is recommended as part of the evaluation of at-risk patients, but available bedside screening tools perform inconsistently. In this study, we developed algorithms to detect swallowing impairment using a novel accelerometer-based dysphagia detection system (DDS). A sample of 344 individuals was enrolled across seven sites in the United States. Dual-axis accelerometry signals were collected prospectively with simultaneous videofluoroscopy (VFSS) during swallows of liquid barium stimuli in thin, mildly, moderately and extremely thick consistencies. Signal processing classifiers were trained using linear discriminant analysis and 10,000 random training-test data splits. The primary objective was to develop an algorithm to detect impaired swallowing safety with thin liquids with an area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) > 80% compared to the VFSS reference standard. Impaired swallowing safety was identified in 7.2% of the thin liquid boluses collected. At least one unsafe thin liquid bolus was found in 19.7% of participants, but participants did not exhibit impaired safety consistently. The DDS classifier algorithms identified participants with impaired thin liquid swallowing safety with a mean AUC of 81.5%, (sensitivity 90.4%, specificity 60.0%). Thicker consistencies were effective for reducing the frequency of penetration-aspiration. This DDS reached targeted performance goals in detecting impaired swallowing safety with thin liquids. Simultaneous measures by DDS and VFSS, as performed here, will be used for future validation studies.
  • Clarke, Angus J.; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina (2019)
    Difficult ethical issues arise for patients and professionals in medical genetics, and often relate to the patient’s family or their social context. Tackling these issues requires sensitivity to nuances of communication and a commitment to clarity and consistency. It also benefits from an awareness of different approaches to ethical theory. Many of the ethical problems encountered in genetics relate to tensions between the wishes or interests of different people, sometimes even people who do not (yet) exist or exist as embryos, either in an established pregnancy or in vitro. Concern for the long-term welfare of a child or young person, or possible future children, or for other members of the family, may lead to tensions felt by the patient (client) in genetic counselling. Differences in perspective may also arise between the patient and professional when the latter recommends disclosure of information to relatives and the patient finds that too difficult, or when the professional considers the genetic testing of a child, sought by parents, to be inappropriate. The expectations of a patient’s community may also lead to the differences in perspective between patient and counsellor. Recent developments of genetic technology permit genome-wide investigations. These have generated additional and more complex data that amplify and exacerbate some pre-existing ethical problems, including those presented by incidental (additional sought and secondary) findings and the recognition of variants currently of uncertain significance, so that reports of genomic investigations may often be provisional rather than definitive. Experience is being gained with these problems but substantial challenges are likely to persist in the long term.
  • Hietikko, Ronja; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas P; Kenttämies, Anu; Ronkainen, Johanna; Ijäs, Kirsty; Lind, Kati; Marjasuo, Suvi; Oksala, Juha; Oksanen, Outi; Saarinen, Tuomas; Savolainen, Ritja; Taari, Kimmo; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Mirtti, Tuomas; Natunen, Kari; Auvinen, Anssi; Rannikko, Antti (BioMed Central, 2020)
    Abstract Background The aim of this study is to investigate the potential impact of prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) -related interreader variability on a population-based randomized prostate cancer screening trial (ProScreen). Methods From January 2014 to January 2018, 100 men aged 50–63 years with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa) in Helsinki University Hospital underwent MRI. Nine radiologists individually reviewed the pseudonymized MRI scans of all 100 men in two ProScreen trial centers. All 100 men were biopsied according to a histological composite variable comprising radical prostatectomy histology (N = 38) or biopsy result within 1 year from the imaging (N = 62). Fleiss’ kappa (κ) was used to estimate the combined agreement between all individual radiologists. Sample data were subsequently extrapolated to 1000-men subgroups of the ProScreen cohort. Results Altogether 89% men of the 100-men sample were diagnosed with PCa within a median of 2.4 years of follow-up. Clinically significant PCa (csPCa) was identified in 76% men. For all PCa, mean sensitivity was 79% (SD ±10%, range 62–96%), and mean specificity 60% (SD ±22%, range 27–82%). For csPCa (Gleason Grade 2–5) MRI was equally sensitive (mean 82%, SD ±9%, range 67–97%) but less specific (mean 47%, SD ±20%, range 21–75%). Interreader agreement for any lesion was fair (κ 0.40) and for PI-RADS 4–5 lesions it was moderate (κ 0.60). Upon extrapolating these data, the average sensitivity and specificity to a screening positive subgroup of 1000 men from ProScreen with a 30% prevalence of csPCa, 639 would be biopsied. Of these, 244 men would be true positive, and 395 false positive. Moreover, 361 men would not be referred to biopsy and among these, 56 csPCas would be missed. The variation among the radiologists was broad as the least sensitive radiologist would have twice as many men biopsied and almost three times more men would undergo unnecessary biopsies. Although the most sensitive radiologist would miss only 2.6% of csPCa (false negatives), the least sensitive radiologist would miss every third. Conclusions Interreader agreement was fair to moderate. The role of MRI in the ongoing ProScreen trial is crucial and has a substantial impact on the screening process.
  • Huvinen, Emilia; Eriksson, Johan G.; Stach-Lempinen, Beata; Tiitinen, Aila; Koivusalo, Saila B. (2018)
    AimsGestational diabetes (GDM) affects a growing number of women and identification of individuals at risk, e.g., with risk prediction models, would be important. However, the performance of GDM risk scores has not been optimal. Here, we assess the impact of GDM heterogeneity on the performance of two top-rated GDM risk scores.MethodsThis is a substudy of the RADIEL triala lifestyle intervention study including women at high GDM risk. We assessed the GDM risk score by Teede and that developed by Van Leeuwen in our high-risk cohort of 510 women. To investigate the heterogeneity of GDM, we further divided the women according to GDM history, BMI, and parity. With the goal of identifying novel predictors of GDM, we further analyzed 319 women with normal glucose tolerance in the first trimester.ResultsBoth risk scores underestimated GDM incidence in our high-risk cohort. Among women with a BMI30kg/m(2) and/or previous GDM, 49.4% developed GDM and 37.4% received the diagnosis already in the first trimester. Van Leeuwen score estimated a 19% probability of GDM and Teede succeeded in risk identification in 61%. The lowest performance of the risk scores was seen among the non-obese women. Fasting plasma glucose, HbA(1c), and family history of diabetes were predictors of GDM in the total study population. Analysis of subgroups did not provide any further information.ConclusionsOur findings suggest that the marked heterogeneity of GDM challenges the development of risk scores for detection of GDM.
  • Pankakoski, Maiju; Heinavaara, Sirpa; Sarkeala, Tytti; Anttila, Ahti (2017)
    Objective: Regular screening and follow-up is an important key to cervical cancer prevention; however, screening inevitably detects mild or borderline abnormalities that would never progress to a more severe stage. We analysed the cumulative probability and recurrence of cervical abnormalities in the Finnish organized screening programme during a 22-year follow-up. Methods: Screening histories were collected for 364,487 women born between 1950 and 1965. Data consisted of 1 207,017 routine screens and 88,143 follow-up screens between 1991 and 2012. Probabilities of cervical abnormalities by age were estimated using logistic regression and generalized estimating equations methodology. Results: The probability of experiencing any abnormality at least once at ages 30-64 was 34.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 33.3-34.6%). Probability was 5.4% (95% CI: 5.0-5.8%) for results warranting referral and 2.2% (95% CI: 2.0-2.4%) for results with histologically confirmed findings. Previous occurrences were associated with an increased risk of detecting new ones, specifically in older women. Conclusion: A considerable proportion of women experience at least one abnormal screening result during their lifetime, and yet very few eventually develop an actual precancerous lesion. Re-evaluation of diagnostic criteria concerning mild abnormalities might improve the balance of harms and benefits of screening. Special monitoring of women with recurrent abnormalities especially at older ages may also be needed.
  • Zhang, Yanlei; Ning, Feng; Sun, Jianping; Pang, Zengchang; Wang, Xiaoyong; Kapur, Anil; Sintonen, Harri; Qiao, Qing (2015)
  • Makkonen, Petra; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Särkelä, Tytti; Anttila, Ahti (2017)
    Objective. Effectiveness of organized cervical cancer screening has been shown in several studies. However, screening among women aged Methods. In the Finnish Cancer Registry there were 284 cervical cancer cases diagnosed and tested below the age of 40 in 2004-2009. Screening histories and data on opportunistic testing for these women and their 1698 age-matched controls were derived from databases of the Mass Screening Registry and The National Institute for Health and Welfare from 1997 onward. OR's and 95% CI's for the association of cervical cancer diagnosis and participation in organized screening and opportunistic testing were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Results were corrected for self-selection bias and attendance rate. Results. Among women aged under 25, OR of cervical cancer for any Pap test taken 0.5-5.5 years before diagnosis was 1.25 (95% CI 0.46-3.43). Attending only organized screening at age 25-39 resulted in OR 0.52 (0.36-0.77), attending only opportunistic testing in OR 0.86 (0.60-1.25) and attending both in OR 0.48 (0.29-0.79). Conclusion. Opportunistic testing showed no clear additional benefit on preventing cervical cancer. The study also supports findings on a smaller effect of screening in younger age groups. (C) 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Seppälä, Toni T; Ahadova, Aysel; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Macrae, Finlay; Evans, D. G; Therkildsen, Christina; Sampson, Julian; Scott, Rodney; Burn, John; Möslein, Gabriela; Bernstein, Inge; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Pylvänäinen, Kirsi; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Lepistö, Anna; Lautrup, Charlotte K; Lindblom, Annika; Plazzer, John-Paul; Winship, Ingrid; Tjandra, Douglas; Katz, Lior H; Aretz, Stefan; Hüneburg, Robert; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Heinimann, Karl; Valle, Adriana D; Neffa, Florencia; Gluck, Nathan; de Vos tot Nederveen Cappel, Wouter H; Vasen, Hans; Morak, Monika; Steinke-Lange, Verena; Engel, Christoph; Rahner, Nils; Schmiegel, Wolff; Vangala, Deepak; Thomas, Huw; Green, Kate; Lalloo, Fiona; Crosbie, Emma J; Hill, James; Capella, Gabriel; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Blanco, Ignacio; ten Broeke, Sanne; Nielsen, Maartje; Ljungmann, Ken; Nakken, Sigve; Lindor, Noralane; Frayling, Ian; Hovig, Eivind; Sunde, Lone; Kloor, Matthias; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Kalager, Mette; Møller, Pål (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background Recent epidemiological evidence shows that colorectal cancer (CRC) continues to occur in carriers of pathogenic mismatch repair (path_MMR) variants despite frequent colonoscopy surveillance in expert centres. This observation conflicts with the paradigm that removal of all visible polyps should prevent the vast majority of CRC in path_MMR carriers, provided the screening interval is sufficiently short and colonoscopic practice is optimal. Methods To inform the debate, we examined, in the Prospective Lynch Syndrome Database (PLSD), whether the time since last colonoscopy was associated with the pathological stage at which CRC was diagnosed during prospective surveillance. Path_MMR carriers were recruited for prospective surveillance by colonoscopy. Only variants scored by the InSiGHT Variant Interpretation Committee as class 4 and 5 (clinically actionable) were included. CRCs detected at the first planned colonoscopy, or within one year of this, were excluded as prevalent cancers. Results Stage at diagnosis and interval between last prospective surveillance colonoscopy and diagnosis were available for 209 patients with 218 CRCs, including 162 path_MLH1, 45 path_MSH2, 10 path_MSH6 and 1 path_PMS2 carriers. The numbers of cancers detected within < 1.5, 1.5–2.5, 2.5–3.5 and at > 3.5 years since last colonoscopy were 36, 93, 56 and 33, respectively. Among these, 16.7, 19.4, 9.9 and 15.1% were stage III–IV, respectively (p = 0.34). The cancers detected more than 2.5 years after the last colonoscopy were not more advanced than those diagnosed earlier (p = 0.14). Conclusions The CRC stage and interval since last colonoscopy were not correlated, which is in conflict with the accelerated adenoma-carcinoma paradigm. We have previously reported that more frequent colonoscopy is not associated with lower incidence of CRC in path_MMR carriers as was expected. In contrast, point estimates showed a higher incidence with shorter intervals between examinations, a situation that may parallel to over-diagnosis in breast cancer screening. Our findings raise the possibility that some CRCs in path_MMR carriers may spontaneously disappear: the host immune response may not only remove CRC precursor lesions in path_MMR carriers, but may remove infiltrating cancers as well. If confirmed, our suggested interpretation will have a bearing on surveillance policy for path_MMR carriers.
  • Seppala, Toni T.; Ahadova, Aysel; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Macrae, Finlay; Evans, D. Gareth; Therkildsen, Christina; Sampson, Julian; Scott, Rodney; Burn, John; Möslein, Gabriela; Bernstein, Inge; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Pylvänäinen, Kirsi; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Lepistö, Anna; Lautrup, Charlotte Kvist; Lindblom, Annika; Plazzer, John-Paul; Winship, Ingrid; Tjandra, Douglas; Katz, Lior H.; Aretz, Stefan; Hueneburg, Robert; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Heinimann, Karl; Della Valle, Adriana; Neffa, Florencia; Gluck, Nathan; Cappel, Wouter H. de Vos Tot Nederveen; Vasen, Hans; Morak, Monika; Steinke-Lange, Verena; Engel, Christoph; Rahner, Nils; Schmiegel, Wolff; Vangala, Deepak; Thomas, Huw; Green, Kate; Lalloo, Fiona; Crosbie, Emma J.; Hill, James; Capella, Gabriel; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Blanco, Ignacio; ten Broeke, Sanne; Nielsen, Maartje; Ljungmann, Ken; Nakken, Sigve; Lindor, Noralane; Frayling, Ian; Hovig, Eivind; Sunde, Lone; Kloor, Matthias; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Kalager, Mette; Moller, Pal (2019)
    BackgroundRecent epidemiological evidence shows that colorectal cancer (CRC) continues to occur in carriers of pathogenic mismatch repair (path_MMR) variants despite frequent colonoscopy surveillance in expert centres. This observation conflicts with the paradigm that removal of all visible polyps should prevent the vast majority of CRC in path_MMR carriers, provided the screening interval is sufficiently short and colonoscopic practice is optimal.MethodsTo inform the debate, we examined, in the Prospective Lynch Syndrome Database (PLSD), whether the time since last colonoscopy was associated with the pathological stage at which CRC was diagnosed during prospective surveillance. Path_MMR carriers were recruited for prospective surveillance by colonoscopy. Only variants scored by the InSiGHT Variant Interpretation Committee as class 4 and 5 (clinically actionable) were included. CRCs detected at the first planned colonoscopy, or within one year of this, were excluded as prevalent cancers.ResultsStage at diagnosis and interval between last prospective surveillance colonoscopy and diagnosis were available for 209 patients with 218 CRCs, including 162 path_MLH1, 45 path_MSH2, 10 path_MSH6 and 1 path_PMS2 carriers. The numbers of cancers detected within 3.5years since last colonoscopy were 36, 93, 56 and 33, respectively. Among these, 16.7, 19.4, 9.9 and 15.1% were stage III-IV, respectively (p=0.34). The cancers detected more than 2.5years after the last colonoscopy were not more advanced than those diagnosed earlier (p=0.14).ConclusionsThe CRC stage and interval since last colonoscopy were not correlated, which is in conflict with the accelerated adenoma-carcinoma paradigm. We have previously reported that more frequent colonoscopy is not associated with lower incidence of CRC in path_MMR carriers as was expected. In contrast, point estimates showed a higher incidence with shorter intervals between examinations, a situation that may parallel to over-diagnosis in breast cancer screening. Our findings raise the possibility that some CRCs in path_MMR carriers may spontaneously disappear: the host immune response may not only remove CRC precursor lesions in path_MMR carriers, but may remove infiltrating cancers as well. If confirmed, our suggested interpretation will have a bearing on surveillance policy for path_MMR carriers.
  • Tiittala, Paula; Ristola, Matti; Liitsola, Kirsi; Ollgren, Jukka; Koponen, Päivikki; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Hiltunen-Back, Eija; Davidkin, Irja; Kivela, Pia (2018)
    Background: Migrants are considered a key population at risk for sexually transmitted and blood-borne diseases in Europe. Prevalence data to support the design of infectious diseases screening protocols are scarce. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of hepatitis B and C, human immunodefiency virus (HIV) infection and syphilis in specific migrant groups in Finland and to assess risk factors for missed diagnosis. Methods: A random sample of 3000 Kurdish, Russian, or Somali origin migrants in Finland was invited to a migrant population-based health interview and examination survey during 2010-2012. Participants in the health examination were offered screening for hepatitis B and C, HIV and syphilis. Notification prevalence in the National Infectious Diseases Register (NIDR) was compared between participants and non-participants to assess non-participation. Missed diagnosis was defined as test-positive case in the survey without previous notification in NIDR. Inverse probability weighting was used to correct for non-participation. Results: Altogether 1000 migrants were screened for infectious diseases. No difference in the notification prevalence among participants and non-participants was observed. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was 2.3%, hepatitis C antibodies 1.7%, and Treponema pallidum antibodies 1.3%. No cases of HIV were identified. Of all test-positive cases, 61% (34/56) had no previous notification in NIDR. 48% of HBsAg, 62.5% of anti-HCV and 84.6% of anti-Trpa positive cases had been missed. Among the Somali population (n = 261), prevalence of missed hepatitis B diagnosis was 3.0%. Of the 324 Russian migrants, 3.0% had not been previously diagnosed with hepatitis C and 2.4% had a missed syphilis diagnosis. In multivariable regression model missed diagnosis was associated with migrant origin, living alone, poor self-perceived health, daily smoking, and previous diagnosis of another blood-borne infection. Conclusions: More than half of chronic hepatitis and syphilis diagnoses had been missed among migrants in Finland. Undiagnosed hepatitis B among Somali migrants implies post-migration transmission that could be prevented by enhanced screening and vaccinations. Rate of missed diagnoses among Russian migrants supports implementation of targeted hepatitis and syphilis screening upon arrival and also in later health care contacts. Coverage and up-take of current screening among migrants should be evaluated.
  • Tiittala, Paula; Ristola, Matti; Liitsola, Kirsi; Ollgren, Jukka; Koponen, Päivikki; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Hiltunen-Back, Eija; Davidkin, Irja; Kivelä, Pia (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background Migrants are considered a key population at risk for sexually transmitted and blood-borne diseases in Europe. Prevalence data to support the design of infectious diseases screening protocols are scarce. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of hepatitis B and C, human immunodefiency virus (HIV) infection and syphilis in specific migrant groups in Finland and to assess risk factors for missed diagnosis. Methods A random sample of 3000 Kurdish, Russian, or Somali origin migrants in Finland was invited to a migrant population-based health interview and examination survey during 2010–2012. Participants in the health examination were offered screening for hepatitis B and C, HIV and syphilis. Notification prevalence in the National Infectious Diseases Register (NIDR) was compared between participants and non-participants to assess non-participation. Missed diagnosis was defined as test-positive case in the survey without previous notification in NIDR. Inverse probability weighting was used to correct for non-participation. Results Altogether 1000 migrants were screened for infectious diseases. No difference in the notification prevalence among participants and non-participants was observed. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was 2.3%, hepatitis C antibodies 1.7%, and Treponema pallidum antibodies 1.3%. No cases of HIV were identified. Of all test-positive cases, 61% (34/56) had no previous notification in NIDR. 48% of HBsAg, 62.5% of anti-HCV and 84.6% of anti-Trpa positive cases had been missed. Among the Somali population (n = 261), prevalence of missed hepatitis B diagnosis was 3.0%. Of the 324 Russian migrants, 3.0% had not been previously diagnosed with hepatitis C and 2.4% had a missed syphilis diagnosis. In multivariable regression model missed diagnosis was associated with migrant origin, living alone, poor self-perceived health, daily smoking, and previous diagnosis of another blood-borne infection. Conclusions More than half of chronic hepatitis and syphilis diagnoses had been missed among migrants in Finland. Undiagnosed hepatitis B among Somali migrants implies post-migration transmission that could be prevented by enhanced screening and vaccinations. Rate of missed diagnoses among Russian migrants supports implementation of targeted hepatitis and syphilis screening upon arrival and also in later health care contacts. Coverage and up-take of current screening among migrants should be evaluated.
  • Eskelinen, Saana; Suvisaari, Janne V. J.; Suvisaari, Jaana M. (2020)
    Background Guidelines on laboratory screening in schizophrenia recommend annual monitoring of fasting lipids and glucose. The utility and the cost effectiveness of more extensive laboratory screening have not been studied. Methods The Living Conditions and the Physical Health of Outpatients with Schizophrenia Study provided a comprehensive health examination, including a laboratory test panel for 275 participants. We calculated the prevalence of the results outside the reference range for each laboratory test, and estimated the cost effectiveness to find an aberrant test result using the number needed to screen to find one abnormal result (NNSAR) and the direct cost spent to find one abnormal result (DCSAR, NNSAR x direct cost per test) formulas. In addition, we studied whether patients who were obese or used clozapine had more often abnormal results. Results A half of the sample had 25-hydroxyvitamin D below, and almost one-fourth cholesterol, triglycerides or glucose above the reference range. One-fifth had sodium below and gamma glutamyltransferase above the reference range. NNSAR was highest for potassium (137) and lowest for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (2). DCSAR was below 5euro for glucose, all lipids and sodium, and below 10euro for creatinine and gamma glutamyltransferase. Potassium (130euro), pH-adjusted ionized calcium (33 euro) and thyroid stimulating hormone (33euro) had highest DCSARs. Several abnormal results were more common in obese and clozapine using patients. Conclusions An annual laboratory screening panel for an outpatient with schizophrenia should include fasting glucose, lipids, sodium, creatinine, a liver function test and complete blood count, and preferably 25-hydroxyvitamin D.