Browsing by Subject "Sedentary time"

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  • Lehto, Elviira; Lehto, Reetta; Ray, Carola; Pajulahti, Riikka; Sajaniemi, Nina; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Roos, Eva (2021)
    Background: Childhood obesity is a major public health concern, especially in low socioeconomic groups. Sedentary time (SED) is an important predictor of obesity. To be able to diminish SED it is important to find modifiable predictors of sedentary behavior. The home environment associated with children's SED may vary by parental socioeconomic status. This study aims to clarify the association between parental educational level (PEL) and the home environment of 3-6-year-old children, and to examine how home environment associates with children's SED, and whether PEL modifies these associations. Methods: A cross-sectional Increased health and wellbeing in preschools (DAGIS) study was conducted in 2015-2016 in Finland. The parents (n = 809) filled in questionnaires assessing PEL, and the home physical and social environment related to children's SED. Children's SED was measured with accelerometers, which the children (n = 745) wore for 1 week. Results: High PEL was associated with a home environment restraining sedentary behaviour compared with low PEL. Stricter descriptive norms about screen time, considering it important to limit the child's screen time, and satisfaction about the child's screen time associated with children's lower SED. The association with parental psychological control and SED was influenced by PEL. In the PEL stratified analyses, however, the associations between psychological control and SED did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: Future interventions aiming to decrease SED should pay attention to relevant factors in children's sedentary behaviour home environment. It is important to acknowledge the possible PEL differences in these factors.
  • Lehto, Elviira; Lehto, Reetta; Ray, Carola; Pajulahti, Riikka; Sajaniemi, Nina; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Roos, Eva (BioMed Central, 2021)
    Abstract Background Childhood obesity is a major public health concern, especially in low socioeconomic groups. Sedentary time (SED) is an important predictor of obesity. To be able to diminish SED it is important to find modifiable predictors of sedentary behavior. The home environment associated with children’s SED may vary by parental socioeconomic status. This study aims to clarify the association between parental educational level (PEL) and the home environment of 3–6-year-old children, and to examine how home environment associates with children’s SED, and whether PEL modifies these associations. Methods A cross-sectional Increased health and wellbeing in preschools (DAGIS) study was conducted in 2015–2016 in Finland. The parents (n = 809) filled in questionnaires assessing PEL, and the home physical and social environment related to children’s SED. Children’s SED was measured with accelerometers, which the children (n = 745) wore for 1 week. Results High PEL was associated with a home environment restraining sedentary behaviour compared with low PEL. Stricter descriptive norms about screen time, considering it important to limit the child’s screen time, and satisfaction about the child’s screen time associated with children’s lower SED. The association with parental psychological control and SED was influenced by PEL. In the PEL stratified analyses, however, the associations between psychological control and SED did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Future interventions aiming to decrease SED should pay attention to relevant factors in children’s sedentary behaviour home environment. It is important to acknowledge the possible PEL differences in these factors.
  • Swindell, Nils; Rees, Paul; Fogelholm, Mikael; Drummen, Mathijs; MacDonald, Ian; Alfredo Martinez, J.; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora; Boyadjieva, Nadka; Bogdanov, Georgi; Poppitt, Sally D.; Gant, Nicholas; Silvestre, Marta P.; Brand-Miller, Jennie; Schlicht, Wolfgang; Muirhead, Roslyn; Brodie, Shannon; Tikkanen, Heikki; Jalo, Elli; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet; Adam, Tanja; Vestentoft, Pia Siig; Larsen, Thomas M.; Raben, Anne; Stratton, Gareth (2020)
    Background Physical activity, sedentary time and sleep have been shown to be associated with cardio-metabolic health. However, these associations are typically studied in isolation or without accounting for the effect of all movement behaviours and the constrained nature of data that comprise a finite whole such as a 24 h day. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between the composition of daily movement behaviours (including sleep, sedentary time (ST), light intensity physical activity (LIPA) and moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA)) and cardio-metabolic health, in a cross-sectional analysis of adults with pre-diabetes. Further, we quantified the predicted differences following reallocation of time between behaviours. Methods Accelerometers were used to quantify daily movement behaviours in 1462 adults from eight countries with a body mass index (BMI) >= 25 kg center dot m(- 2), impaired fasting glucose (IFG; 5.6-6.9 mmol center dot l(- 1)) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; 7.8-11.0 mmol center dot l(- 1) 2 h following oral glucose tolerance test, OGTT). Compositional isotemporal substitution was used to estimate the association of reallocating time between behaviours. Results Replacing MVPA with any other behaviour around the mean composition was associated with a poorer cardio-metabolic risk profile. Conversely, when MVPA was increased, the relationships with cardiometabolic risk markers was favourable but with smaller predicted changes than when MVPA was replaced. Further, substituting ST with LIPA predicted improvements in cardio-metabolic risk markers, most notably insulin and HOMA-IR. Conclusions This is the first study to use compositional analysis of the 24 h movement composition in adults with overweight/obesity and pre-diabetes. These findings build on previous literature that suggest replacing ST with LIPA may produce metabolic benefits that contribute to the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the asymmetry in the predicted change in risk markers following the reallocation of time to/from MVPA highlights the importance of maintaining existing levels of MVPA.
  • Swindell, Nils; Rees, Paul; Fogelholm, Mikael; Drummen, Mathijs; MacDonald, Ian; Martinez, J. A; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora; Boyadjieva, Nadka; Bogdanov, Georgi; Poppitt, Sally D; Gant, Nicholas; Silvestre, Marta P; Brand-Miller, Jennie; Schlicht, Wolfgang; Muirhead, Roslyn; Brodie, Shannon; Tikkanen, Heikki; Jalo, Elli; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet; Adam, Tanja; Vestentoft, Pia S; Larsen, Thomas M; Raben, Anne; Stratton, Gareth (BioMed Central, 2020)
    Abstract Background Physical activity, sedentary time and sleep have been shown to be associated with cardio-metabolic health. However, these associations are typically studied in isolation or without accounting for the effect of all movement behaviours and the constrained nature of data that comprise a finite whole such as a 24 h day. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between the composition of daily movement behaviours (including sleep, sedentary time (ST), light intensity physical activity (LIPA) and moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA)) and cardio-metabolic health, in a cross-sectional analysis of adults with pre-diabetes. Further, we quantified the predicted differences following reallocation of time between behaviours. Methods Accelerometers were used to quantify daily movement behaviours in 1462 adults from eight countries with a body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg·m− 2, impaired fasting glucose (IFG; 5.6–6.9 mmol·l− 1) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; 7.8–11.0 mmol•l− 1 2 h following oral glucose tolerance test, OGTT). Compositional isotemporal substitution was used to estimate the association of reallocating time between behaviours. Results Replacing MVPA with any other behaviour around the mean composition was associated with a poorer cardio-metabolic risk profile. Conversely, when MVPA was increased, the relationships with cardiometabolic risk markers was favourable but with smaller predicted changes than when MVPA was replaced. Further, substituting ST with LIPA predicted improvements in cardio-metabolic risk markers, most notably insulin and HOMA-IR. Conclusions This is the first study to use compositional analysis of the 24 h movement composition in adults with overweight/obesity and pre-diabetes. These findings build on previous literature that suggest replacing ST with LIPA may produce metabolic benefits that contribute to the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the asymmetry in the predicted change in risk markers following the reallocation of time to/from MVPA highlights the importance of maintaining existing levels of MVPA. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01777893).
  • Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Barreira, Tiago V.; Schuna, John M.; Mire, Emily F.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Fogelholm, Mikael; Hu, Gang; Kuriyan, Rebecca; Kurpad, Anura; Lambert, Estelle V.; Maher, Carol; Maia, Jose; Matsudo, Victor; Olds, Tim; Onywera, Vincent; Sarmiento, Olga L.; Standage, Martyn; Tremblay, Mark S.; Zhao, Pei; Church, Timothy S.; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; ISCOLE Res Grp (2015)
    Background: We compared 24-hour waist-worn accelerometer wear time characteristics of 9-11 year old children in the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE) to similarly aged U.S. children providing waking-hours waist-worn accelerometer data in the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Methods: Valid cases were defined as having >= 4 days with >= 10 hours of waking wear time in a 24-hour period, including one weekend day. Previously published algorithms for extracting total sleep episode time from 24-hour accelerometer data and for identifying wear time (in both the 24-hour and waking-hours protocols) were applied. The number of valid days obtained and a ratio (percent) of valid cases to the number of participants originally wearing an accelerometer were computed for both ISCOLE and NHANES. Given the two surveys' discrepant sampling designs, wear time (minutes/day, hours/day) from U.S. ISCOLE was compared to NHANES using a meta-analytic approach. Wear time for the 11 additional countries participating in ISCOLE were graphically compared with NHANES. Results: 491 U.S. ISCOLE children (9.92 +/- 0.03 years of age [M +/- SE]) and 586 NHANES children (10.43 +/- 0.04 years of age) were deemed valid cases. The ratio of valid cases to the number of participants originally wearing an accelerometer was 76.7% in U.S. ISCOLE and 62.6% in NHANES. Wear time averaged 1357.0 +/- 4.2 minutes per 24-hour day in ISCOLE. Waking wear time was 884.4 +/- 2.2 minutes/day for U.S. ISCOLE children and 822.6 +/- 4.3 minutes/day in NHANES children (difference = 61.8 minutes/day, p <0.001). Wear time characteristics were consistently higher in all ISCOLE study sites compared to the NHANES protocol. Conclusions: A 24-hour waist-worn accelerometry protocol implemented in U.S. children produced 22.6 out of 24 hours of possible wear time, and 61.8 more minutes/day of waking wear time than a similarly implemented and processed waking wear time waist-worn accelerometry protocol. Consistent results were obtained internationally. The 24-hour protocol may produce an important increase in wear time compliance that also provides an opportunity to study the total sleep episode time separate and distinct from physical activity and sedentary time detected during waking-hours.