Browsing by Subject "Self-regulated learning"

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  • Virtanen, Päivi; Niemi, Hannele M.; Nevgi, Anne (2017)
    The study identifies the relationships between active learning, student teachers’ self-regulated learning and professional competences. Further, the aim is to investigate how active learning promotes professional competences of student teachers with different self-regulation profiles. Responses from 422 student teachers to an electronic survey were analysed using statistical methods. It was found that the use of active learning methods, such as goal-oriented and intentional learning as well as autonomous and responsible group work, are strongly and positively related to the achievement of professional competences. To develop the best competences, student teachers need high learning motivation and excellent self-regulation strategies. The mean scores in professional competences of highly motivated student teachers with excellent self-regulated learning were significantly higher when their experiences of active learning increased. Moreover, student teachers with high motivation and moderate self-regulation also benefited significantly from the use of active learning methods.
  • Ketonen, Elina E.; Haarala-Muhonen, Anne; Hirsto, Laura; Hänninen, Jari J.; Wähälä, Kristiina; Lonka, Kirsti (2016)
    Entrance to university does not automatically lead to high academic engagement and success, and there may be individual differences in student engagement. In the present study, university students' (N = 668) academic engagement and disengagement profiles, and the differences between them in terms of academic achievement, were investigated. Students from introductory courses were classified by Latent Profile Analysis (LPA) into homogenous groups having similar patterns according to the following variables: study engagement, study-related exhaustion, lack of interest, lack of self-regulation, and uncertainty of one's career choice. Four groups of students were identified: engaged, disengaged, undecided, and alienated. Engaged students received the highest grades, with disengaged and undecided students performing most poorly. In addition, the profiles were related to the behavioral indicators of engagement (i.e., ECTS credits). Even after two years of studying, engaged students were performing better than disengaged students. The study's implications for both research and practice are discussed. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Kaatrakoski, Heli; Littlejohn, Allison; Hood, Nina (2017)
    Open education, including the use of open educational resources (OER) and the adoption of open education practice, has the potential to challenge educators to change their practice in fundamental ways. This paper forms part of a larger study focusing on higher education educators' learning from and through their engagement with OER. The first part of the study was a quantitative survey investigating educators' learning behaviour when they learned to use OER in their practice. The second part of the study explored qualitatively how educators engaged with OER and how they conceptualised their learning. Data were gathered through interviews with 30 higher education educators. This paper reports the analysis of these interviews. The analysis draws on the theory of self-regulated learning and cultural-historical activity theory to explore the challenges adult education practitioners encounter when changing their practice. The study tests the application of a framework that traces the discursive manifestations of contradictions, exploring how this framework can be used to examine different aspects of self-regulated learning as educators learn how to use OER. We have identified three distinct tensions in higher education educators' practice: tensions between the emerging needs of the individual (as he or she adopts new forms of practice) and organisational policies; between the transfer of responsibilities from educators to students as new practice is embedded and institutional accountability; and between cost efficiency and learning objectives. The framework for the discursive manifestations of contradictions was a useful tool used to surface these apparent tensions.
  • Kaatrakoski, Heli; Littlejohn, Allison; Hood, Nina (2017)
    Open education, including the use of open educational resources (OER) and the adoption of open education practice, has the potential to challenge educators to change their practice in fundamental ways. This paper forms part of a larger study focusing on higher education educators' learning from and through their engagement with OER. The first part of the study was a quantitative survey investigating educators' learning behaviour when they learned to use OER in their practice. The second part of the study explored qualitatively how educators engaged with OER and how they conceptualised their learning. Data were gathered through interviews with 30 higher education educators. This paper reports the analysis of these interviews. The analysis draws on the theory of self-regulated learning and cultural-historical activity theory to explore the challenges adult education practitioners encounter when changing their practice. The study tests the application of a framework that traces the discursive manifestations of contradictions, exploring how this framework can be used to examine different aspects of self-regulated learning as educators learn how to use OER. We have identified three distinct tensions in higher education educators' practice: tensions between the emerging needs of the individual (as he or she adopts new forms of practice) and organisational policies; between the transfer of responsibilities from educators to students as new practice is embedded and institutional accountability; and between cost efficiency and learning objectives. The framework for the discursive manifestations of contradictions was a useful tool used to surface these apparent tensions.
  • Mäenpää, Kati; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Järvenoja, Hanna; Peltonen, Jouni (2018)
    Motivation regulation, study engagement, and students' wellbeing are critical components of skillful self-regulated learning. However, few studies have focused on these factors and their relationship in nursing education and as there is an increased usage of blended learning in nursing education, measuring students' learning in this setting is increasingly important. This person-oriented, quantitative study explored first-year nursing students' (N = 90) motivation regulation related to study engagement and study burnout in blended and traditional learning environments in two undergraduate nursing programs. Regardless of the learning environment, the majority of the nursing students (65.6%) had a highly developed motivation regulation profile. They performed highly on motivation regulation, showed strong engagement, and exibhited reduced exposure for study burnout compared to those with less-developed motivation regulation profiles. It is suggested that motivation regulation, study engagement, and experienced burnout influence nursing students' learning. These components should be emphasized in developing nursing education and facilitating nursing students' learning.
  • Perander, Katarina; Londen, Monica; Holm, Gunilla (2021)
    Purpose - The purpose of this study was to investigate how a workshop can enhance first-year university students' understanding of their study strategies and self-regulated learning. Design/methodology/approach - Aqualitative content analysis was done of 190 reflective journals written by first-year university students. Findings - The main findings confirmed that starting studies in higher education is challenging for many students. New insights were provided on how these challenges can be addressed, especially regarding selfregulated learning. Students perceived that they gained several insights from the workshop that they believed could benefit their studying and thereby enhance motivation. Practical implications - This study showed that even small measures promote both good study habits and specifically self-regulated learning skills. Interventions like the workshop described in this study ease first-year students' transition to the university and foster successful studies for all students. Originality/value - This study contributes to research on supporting students' transition to higher education by investigating how students perceive early study skill interventions. It adds to a holistic perspective of students' challenges and coping strategies during their first semester in higher education.