Browsing by Subject "Sleep quantity"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-3 of 3
  • Lallukka, Tea; Sivertsen, Borge; Kronholm, Erkki; Bin, Yu Sun; Overland, Simon; Glozier, Nick (2018)
    Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the interaction of two key determinants of sleep health, quantity and quality, with physical, emotional, and social functioning, in the general population. Design: Nationally-representative Australian cross-sectional study. Setting: General population. Participants: 14,571 people aged 15 or older in Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) in 2013. Measurements: The associations of sleep quality (good/poor) in combination with mid-range (6-8 hours), short (8) sleep duration with functioning, determined from the SF-36, were evaluated using logistic regression adjusting for sociodemographic, relationships, health behaviors, obesity, pain, and mental and physical illness confounders. Results: After adjusting for gender, and age, poor sleep quality in combination with short, mid-range and long sleep was associated with worse physical, emotional and social functioning. Pain and comorbid illness explained much of these associations, while attenuation from other covariates was minor. The associations of poor sleep quality with worse functioning remained after full adjustment regardless of sleep duration, while among people with good quality sleep, only those with long sleep duration reported poorer functioning. Conclusions: Poor sleep quality has robust associations with worse functioning regardless of total duration in the general population. There appears to be a substantial number of functional short sleepers with good quality sleep. (c) 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Martikainen, Silja (Helsingfors universitet, 2010)
    This thesis examines the associations between personality traits and sleep quantity and quality in young adults. Additionally the possible effects of birth status on these associations are examined. The data used in this thesis is part of a birth cohort study (Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults). The personality traits are based on the five-factor model of personality. The sleep quantity and quality are based on actigraphy assessments. Four hypothesis were made about the personality and sleep associations: (1) neuroticism is related to a lesser quality of sleep, (2) there will be more significant associations between personality traits and sleep quality than between personality traits and sleep quantity, (3) the Very Low Birth Weight (VLBW) as well as, (4) the Small for Gestational Age (SGA) status will affect the associations. Linear regressions were used to study the associations between personality traits and sleep quality and quantity. Whenever an association was significant, it was tested whether this association was moderated first, by the VLBW and second, by the SGA status of the participant. The results were mostly in line with previous research especially demonstrating the negative association between neuroticism and the quality of sleep and suggesting that vulnerability to stress decreases sleep quality. Also it was found that agreeableness and conscientiousness were associated with better sleep quality and extraversion was associated with lower sleep quantity. In addition SGA status moderated the personality and sleep associations. It is proposed that there are two factors behind the interaction. First, prenatally developing mechanisms have an effect on the development of sleep as well as personality. Second, differences in the postnatal environment, for instance the parenting practices, can account for this finding. Future research could focus especially on what kind of prenatal disturbances SGA infants have in the development of mechanisms related to sleep and personality. Also focusing on the differences in parental interaction might shed more light on the results.
  • Toffol, Elena; Lahti-Pulkkinen, Marius; Lahti, Jari; Lipsanen, Jari; Heinonen, Kati; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Hämäläinen, Esa; Kajantie, Eero; Laivuori, Hannele; Villa, Pia M.; Räikkönen, Katri (2019)
    Objective: Maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy have been associated with poor offspring sleep. Yet, it remains unknown whether depressive symptoms throughout pregnancy are more harmful to the child than depressive symptoms only during certain time periods in pregnancy, whether associations are specific to pregnancy stage, whether maternal symptomatology after pregnancy mediates or adds to the prenatal effects, and whether any effects are specific to some child sleep characteristics. Methods: A total of 2321 mothers from the Prediction and Prevention of Pre-eclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction (PREDO) study completed the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale biweekly between gestational weeks thorn days 12 + 0/13 + 6 and 38 + 0/39 + 6. At child's mean age of 3.5 (standard deviation = 0.7) years, mothers completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II and answered questions on child sleep quantity and quality using the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire (BISQ) and sleep disorders using the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children. Results: Maternal depressive symptoms showed high stability throughout pregnancy. Children of mothers with clinically significant symptomatology throughout pregnancy had shorter mother-rated sleep duration, longer sleep latency, higher odds for waking up two or more times during the night and for total and several specific sleep disorders. These associations were robust to covariates. However, maternal depressive symptoms at the child follow-up fully mediated the associations with sleep duration and awakenings, partially mediated those with sleep latency and disorders, and added to the effects on sleep disorders. Conclusion: Maternal depressive symptoms throughout pregnancy are associated with mother-rated child sleep quantity, quality, and disorders. Maternal depressive symptoms at child follow-up mediate and add to the prenatal adverse effects on child sleep characteristics. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.