Browsing by Subject "Star forming regions"

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  • Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Liu, Tie; Kim, Gwanjeong; Yi, Hee-Weon; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Hirano, Naomi; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Ohashi, Satoshi; Sanhueza, Patricio; Di Francesco, James; Evans, Neal J.; Fuller, Gary A.; Kandori, Ryo; Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Feng, Siyi; Hirota, Tomoya; Sakai, Takeshi; Lu, Xing; Lu'o'ng, Quang Nguyen; Thompson, Mark A.; Wu, Yuefang; Li, Di; Kim, Kee-Tae; Wang, Ke; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Juvela, Mika; Toth, L. Viktor (2020)
    We mapped two molecular cloud cores in the Orion A cloud with the 7 m Array of the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeterArray (ALMA) and with the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope. These cores have bright N2D+ emission in single-pointing observations with the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope, have a relatively high deuterium fraction, and are thought to be close to the onset of star formation. One is a star-forming core, and the other is starless. These cores are located along filaments observed in N2H+ and show narrow line widths of 0.41 km s(-1) and 0.45 km s(-1) in N2D+, respectively, with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. Both cores were detected with the ALMA ACA 7 m Array in the continuum and molecular lines at Band 6. The starless core G211 shows a clumpy structure with several sub-cores, which in turn show chemical differences. Also, the sub-cores in G211 have internal motions that are almost purely thermal. The starless sub-core G211D, in particular, shows a hint of the inverse P Cygni profile, suggesting infall motion. The star-forming core G210 shows an interesting spatial feature of two N2D+ peaks of similar intensity and radial velocity located symmetrically with respect to the single dust continuum peak. One interpretation is that the two N2D+ peaks represent an edge-on pseudo-disk. The CO outflow lobes, however, are not directed perpendicular to the line connecting both N2D+ peaks.
  • Dutta, Somnath; Lee, Chin-Fei; Liu, Tie; Hirano, Naomi; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Kim, Kee-Tae; Shang, Hsien; Sahu, Dipen; Kim, Gwanjeong; Moraghan, Anthony; Jhan, Kai-Syun; Hsu, Shih-Ying; Evans, Neal J.; Johnstone, Doug; Ward-Thompson, Derek; Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Lee, Chang Won; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Traficante, Alessio; Juvela, Mika; Vastel, Charlotte; Zhang, Qizhou; Sanhueza, Patricio; Soam, Archana; Kwon, Woojin; Bronfman, Leonardo; Eden, David; Goldsmith, Paul F.; He, Jinhua; Wu, Yuefang; Pelkonen, Veli-Matti; Qin, Sheng-Li; Li, Shanghuo; Li, Di (2020)
    Planck Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCCs) are considered to be the ideal targets to probe the early phases of star formation. We have conducted a survey of 72 young dense cores inside PGCCs in the Orion complex with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) at 1.3 mm (band 6) using three different configurations (resolutions similar to 035, 10, and 70) to statistically investigate their evolutionary stages and substructures. We have obtained images of the 1.3 mm continuum and molecular line emission ((CO)-C-12, and SiO) at an angular resolution of similar to 035 (similar to 140 au) with the combined arrays. We find 70 substructures within 48 detected dense cores with median dust mass similar to 0.093 M and deconvolved size similar to 027. Dense substructures are clearly detected within the central 1000 au of four candidate prestellar cores. The sizes and masses of the substructures in continuum emission are found to be significantly reduced with protostellar evolution from Class 0 to Class I. We also study the evolutionary change in the outflow characteristics through the course of protostellar mass accretion. A total of 37 sources exhibit CO outflows, and 20 (>50%) show high-velocity jets in SiO. The CO velocity extents (Delta Vs) span from 4 to 110 km s(-1) with outflow cavity opening angle width at 400 au ranging from [Theta(obs)](400) similar to 06-39, which corresponds to 334-1257. For the majority of the outflow sources, the Delta Vs show a positive correlation with [Theta(obs)](400), suggesting that as protostars undergo gravitational collapse, the cavity opening of a protostellar outflow widens and the protostars possibly generate more energetic outflows.