Browsing by Subject "Subarctic lakes"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-2 of 2
  • Korkonen, Sanna; Weckström, Jan; Korhola, Atte (2020)
    The occurrence of various chrysophyte cyst morphotypes is unknown in Finland, with the exception of a few isolated lake studies. We set out to chart which cyst types are found in Finland and what their ecological preferences are, focusing on cyst-air temperature relationships that could be further utilized in reconstructing past winter/spring air temperatures and ice-free periods from sedimentary cyst assemblages. Surface sediment samples from lakes across Finland were analysed for their chrysophyte stomatocyst assemblages. Multivariate ecological techniques (e.g. canonical correspondence analysis, principal component analysis) were used to identify the environmental variables that most strongly affected the distribution of the cysts. This survey expanded the known geographical range for several cyst types. Lake water pH and ice-free periods (surrogate for air temperature) explained the statistically significant distribution and composition of the cyst assemblages studied. The results broaden our knowledge of cyst biogeography and strengthen the findings of previous studies of the environmental factors contributing to the occurrence of cysts. Highly variable and rich chrysophyte cyst assemblages in Finland are clearly associated with temperature, pH, electrical conductivity and total phosphorus, with good potential in contemporary and retrospective environmental assessment.
  • Sanchez-Hernandez, Javier; Hayden, Brian; Harrod, Chris; Kahilainen, Kimmo K. (2021)
    A mechanistic understanding of how environmental change affects trophic ecology of fish at the individual and population level remains elusive. To address this, we conducted a space-for-time approach incorporating environmental gradients (temperature, precipitation and nutrients), lake morphometry (visibility, depth and area), fish communities (richness, competition and predation), prey availability (richness and density) and feeding (population niche breadth and individual trophic specialisation) for 15 native fish taxa belonging to different thermal guilds from 35 subarctic lakes along a marked climate-productivity gradient corresponding to future climate change predictions. We revealed significant and contrasting responses from two generalist species that are abundant and widely distributed in the region. The cold-water adapted European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus) reduced individual specialisation in warmer and more productive lakes. Conversely, the cool-water adapted Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) showed increased levels of individual specialism along climate-productivity gradient. Although whitefish and perch differed in the way they consumed prey along the climate-productivity gradient, they both switched from consumption of zooplankton in cooler, less productive lakes, to macrozoobenthos in warmer, more productive lakes. Species with specialist benthic or pelagic feeding did not show significant changes in trophic ecology along the gradient. We conclude that generalist consumers, such as warmer adapted perch, have clear advantages over colder and clear-water specialised species or morphs through their capacity to undergo reciprocal benthic-pelagic switches in feeding associated with environmental change. The capacity to show trophic flexibility in warmer and more productive lakes is likely a key trait for species dominance in future communities of high latitudes under climate change.