Browsing by Subject "Successful aging"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-2 of 2
  • Jyväkorpi, Satu K.; Urtamo, Annele; Strandberg, Arto Y.; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela; Salomaa, Veikko; Kivimäki, Mika; Luotola, Kari; Strandberg, Timo E. (2020)
    Background & aims: Prognostic significance of metabolically healthy overweight and obesity (MHO) is under debate. However the relationship between MHO and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is less studied. We compared successful aging (longevity plus HRQoL) in men with MHO, metabolically healthy normal weight (MHN) and metabolically unhealthy overweight and obesity (MUO). Methods: In the Helsinki Businessmen Study longitudinal cohort, consisting of men born 1919 to 1934. In 1985/86, overweight (BMI >= 25 kg/m(2)) and metabolic health were determined in 1309 men (median age 60 years). HRQoL was assessed using RAND-36/SF-36 in 2000 and 2007, and all-cause mortality retrieved from registers up to 2018. The proportion of men reaching 90 years was also calculated. Results: Of the men, 469 (35.8%), 538 (41.1%), 276 (21.1%), and 26 (2.0%) were MHN, MHO, MUO and MUN, respectively. During the 32-year follow-up, 72.3% men died. With MHN as reference, adjusted hazard ratio with all-cause mortality was 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93 to 1.27) for MHO, and 1.18 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.47) for MUO. During follow-up, 273 men reached 90 years. With MHN as reference, adjusted odds ratio for MHO was 0.82 (95% CI 0.59 to 1.14) and 0.62 (95% CI 0.41 to 0.95) for MUO. Men in MHN group scored generally highest in RAND-36 HRQoL subscales in 2000 and 2007, of those significantly better in Physical functioning, Role physical, Role emotional, Bodily Pain, and General health sub-scales compared to MHO group in 2000. Conclusions: As compared to MHN, MHO in late midlife does not increase mortality, but impairs odds for successful aging. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.
  • Urtamo, Annele; Huohvanainen, Emmi; Pitkälä, Kaisu H.; Strandberg, Timo E. (2019)
    BackgroundActive and healthy aging (AHA) is an important phenomenon in aging societies.AimsOur aim was to investigate midlife predictors of AHA in a socioeconomically homogenous male cohort.MethodsIn 2010, AHA was defined in the Helsinki Businessmen Study (men born in 1919-1934) with six criteria: (1) being alive, (2) responding to the mailed survey, (3) no reported cognitive problems, (4) feeling of happiness, (5) no difficulties in activities of daily living (ADL), and (6) no significant chronic diseases. Midlife factors were assessed in 1974 (n=1759, mean age 47years). Of the survivors in 2010 (n=839), 10.0% (n=84) fulfilled all AHA criteria, whilst 13.7% (n=115) had chronic diseases but fulfilled other five criteria. Midlife predictors of AHA were analyzed with logistic models.ResultsOf the midlife factors, smoking [Odds ratio (OR) 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.25-0.77], higher body mass index (BMI) (OR 0.75, 0.59-0.96), andhigher total cholesterol (OR 0.76, 0.60-0.97)prevented significantly full AHA criteria, whereas higher self-rated health (SRH) (OR 1.73, 1.07-2.80) predicted significantly offulfilling all AHA criteria. Midlife smoking (OR 0.87, 0.84-0.91), higher BMI (OR 0.73, 0.61-0.86), andhigher alcohol consumption (OR 0.73, 0.60-0.90)prevented significantly of fulfilling the five AHA criteria with chronic diseases, and higher SRH (OR 1.90, 1.37-2.63) predictedsignificantly thefive AHA criteria (chronic diseases present).DiscussionOur study suggests that midlife factors, especially good SRH and low levels of cardiovascular risk factors, are associated with AHA.ConclusionsThe study emphasizes the importance of life-course predictors of healthy aging.