Browsing by Subject "Suicidal ideation"

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  • Flink, N.; Lehto, S. M.; Koivumaa-Honkanen, H.; Viinamäki, H.; Ruusunen, A.; Valkonen-Korhonen, M.; Honkalampi, K. (2017)
    Background and objectives: Suicidal ideation is a key risk factor for suicidal behaviour among depressed individuals. To explore underlying cognitive patterns associated with suicidal ideation, the present study compared early maladaptive schemas (EMSs) among psychiatric outpatients in treatment for major depressive disorder with and without current suicidal ideation. Methods: The sample consisted of 79 depressed patients who responded to the background questionnaire and completed the Young Schema Questionnaire short form-extended, 21-item Beck Depression Inventory and Beck Hopelessness Scale. Results: Patients with suicidal ideation were more maladaptive in respect to the majority of EMSs compared to those without. After controlling for the concurrent depressive symptom severity and hopelessness 'Vulnerability to Harm or Illness' EMS, which concerns catastrophising beliefs, remained a predictor for suicidal ideation. Conclusion: EMSs may contribute to suicidal ideation among depressed individuals regardless of their mood and future orientation. These results offer implications for the assessment and treatment of suicidality. (C) 2017 Asociacion Universitaria de Zaragoza para el Progreso de la Psiquiatria y la Salud Mental. Published by Elsevier Espana, S.L.U. All rights reserved.
  • Korhonen, Tellervo; Sihvola, Elina; Latvala, Antti; Dick, Danielle M.; Pulkkinen, Lea; Nurnberger, John; Rose, Richard J.; Kaprio, Jaakko (2018)
    Background: Developmental relationships between tobacco use and suicide-related behaviors (SRB) remain unclear. Our objective was to investigate the longitudinal associations of tobacco use in adolescence and SRB in adulthood. Methods: Using a prospective design, we examined whether tobacco use in adolescence is associated with SRB (intentional self-injury, suicide ideation) in young adulthood in a population-based sample of 1330 twins (626 males, 704 females). The baseline and follow-up data were collected by professionally administered semi-structured poly-diagnostic interviews at ages 14 and 22, respectively. Results: After adjusting for multiple potential confounders, those who reported early-onset of regular tobacco use had a significantly increased risk for intentional self-injury, such as cutting or burning, at age 22 (adjusted odds ratio[AOR] 4.57, 95% CI 1.93-10.8) in comparison to those who had not at all initiated tobacco use. Also, daily cigarette smoking at baseline was associated with future intentional self-injury (AOR 4.45, 95% CI 2.04-9.70). Early-onset tobacco use was associated with suicidal ideation in females (AOR 3.69, 95% CI 1.56-8.72) but not in males. Considering any SRB, baseline daily smokers (AOR 2.13, 95% CI 1.12-4.07) and females with early onset of regular tobacco use (AOR 3.97, 95% CI 1.73-9.13) had an increased likelihood. Within-family analyses among twin pairs discordant for exposure and outcome controlling for familial confounds showed similar, albeit statistically non-significant, associations. Conclusion: Early-onset tobacco use in adolescence is longitudinally associated with SRB (intentional self-injury and/or suicide ideation) in young adulthood, particularly among females. Further investigation may reveal whether this association has implications for prevention of SRB in adolescence and young adulthood.