Browsing by Subject "TABLETS"

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  • Viidik, Laura; Seera, Dagmar; Antikainen, Osmo; Kogermann, Karin; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Laidmäe, Ivo (2019)
    Printing technologies combined with a computer-aided design (CAD) have found an increasing number of uses in pharmaceutical applications. In extrusion-based printing, the material is forced through a nozzle to form a three-dimensional (3D) structure pre-designed by CAD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the 3D-printability of biocompatible aqueous poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) gels and to investigate the effects of three formulation parameters on the 3D printing process. The impact of PEO concentration (gel viscosity), printing head speed and printing plate temperature was investigated at three different levels using a full factorial experimental design. The aqueous PEO gels were printed with a bench-top extrusion-based 3D printing system at an ambient room temperature. The viscosity measurements confirmed that the aqueous PEO gels follow a shear-thinning behaviour suitable for extrusion-based printing. Heating the printing plate allowed the gel to dry faster resulting in more precise printing outcome. With the non-heated plate, the gel formed a dumbbell-shaped grid instead of straight lines. Higher concentration and more viscous PEO gels formed the best structured 3D-printed lattices. In conclusion, the accuracy and precision of extrusion-based 3D printing of aqueous PEO gels is highly dependent on the formulation (PEO concentration) and printing parameters (printing head speed, plate temperature). By optimizing these critical process parameters, PEO may be suitable for printing novel drug delivery systems.
  • Keltanen, Terhi N.; Heikman, Pertti K.; Muhonen, Leea H.; Gunnar, Teemu O.; Ojanperä, Ilkka A. (2019)
    Urine samples were analyzed for lactose to investigate if elevated lactose concentrations indicate recent (<48 hours) intravenous abuse of substances containing lactose as an excipient. Elevated lactose levels were found in samples given by patients who had recently injected substances intravenously, verified by fresh injection marks. Urine lactose assay can support clinical and toxicological findings when assessing substance abuse.
  • Tanner, Timo; Antikainen, Osmo; Ehlers, Henrik; Blanco, David; Yliruusi, Jouko (2018)
    The compression physics of powders must be considered when developing a suitable tablet formulation. In the present study, the gravitation-based high-velocity method was utilized to analyze mechanical properties of eight common pharmaceutical excipients: two grades of lactose, anhydrous glucose, anhydrous calcium hydrogen phosphate, three grades of microcrystalline cellulose and starch. Samples were compressed five times consecutively with varying pressure and speed so that Setup A produced higher pressure and longer contact time than Setup B. The important parameters obtained from samples were porosity profiles, compaction pressure, contact time, internal energy change and the amount of elastic recovery. All acquired data was only based on distance-time profile of the compression event. Lactose and glucose fragmented effectively while calcium hydrogen phosphate remained in rearrangement phase, due to its hardness and insufficient pressure applied. Microcrystalline cellulose samples showed plastic behaviour and starch was most elastic of all the samples. By utilizing the method, examined excipients could be categorized according to their compression behaviour in an accurate and cost-efficient manner.
  • Tanner, Timo; Antikainen, Osmo; Ehlers, Henrik; Yliruusi, Jouko (2017)
    With modern tableting machines large amounts of tablets are produced with high output. Consequently, methods to examine powder compression in a high-velocity setting are in demand. In the present study, a novel gravitation-based method was developed to examine powder compression. A steel bar is dropped on a punch to compress microcrystalline cellulose and starch samples inside the die. The distance of the bar is being read by a high-accuracy laser displacement sensor which provides a reliable distance-time plot for the bar movement. In-die height and density of the compact can be seen directly from this data, which can be examined further to obtain information on velocity, acceleration and energy distribution during compression. The energy consumed in compact formation could also be seen. Despite the high vertical compression speed, the method was proven to be cost-efficient, accurate and reproducible. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Pessi, Jenni; Svanbäck, Sami; Lassila, Ilkka; Haeggstrom, Edward; Yliruusi, Jouko (2017)
    We introduce a system with a lyophilic matrix to aid dissolution studies of powders and particulate systems. This lyophilic matrix method (LM method) is based on the ability to discriminate between non-dissolved particles and the dissolved species. In the LM method the test substance is embedded in a thin lyophilic core-shell matrix. This permits rapid contact with the dissolution medium while minimizing dispersion of non-dissolved particles without presenting a substantial diffusion barrier. The method produces realistic dissolution and release results for particulate systems, especially those featuring nanoscale particles. By minimizing method-induced effects on the dissolution profile of nanopowders, the LM method overcomes shortcomings associated with current dissolution tests. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.