Browsing by Subject "THREATS"

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  • Bolotov, Ivan N.; Makhrov, Alexander A.; Gofarov, Mikhail Yu.; Aksenova, Olga V.; Aspholm, Paul E.; Bespalaya, Yulia V.; Kabakov, Mikhail B.; Kolosova, Yulia S.; Kondakov, Alexander V.; Ofenbock, Thomas; Ostrovsky, Andrew N.; Popov, Igor Yu.; von Proschwitz, Ted; Rudzite, Mudite; Rudzitis, Maris; Sokolova, Svetlana E.; Valovirta, Ilmari; Vikhrev, Ilya V.; Vinarski, Maxim V.; Zotin, Alexey A. (2018)
    The effects of climate change on oligotrophic rivers and their communities are almost unknown, albeit these ecosystems are the primary habitat of the critically endangered freshwater pearl mussel and its host fishes, salmonids. The distribution and abundance of pearl mussels have drastically decreased throughout Europe over the last century, particularly within the southern part of the range, but causes of this wide-scale extinction process are unclear. Here we estimate the effects of climate change on pearl mussels based on historical and recent samples from 50 rivers and 6 countries across Europe. We found that the shell convexity may be considered an indicator of the thermal effects on pearl mussel populations under warming climate because it reflects shifts in summer temperatures and is significantly different in viable and declining populations. Spatial and temporal modeling of the relationship between shell convexity and population status show that global climate change could have accelerated the population decline of pearl mussels over the last 100 years through rapidly decreasing suitable distribution areas. Simulation predicts future warming-induced range reduction, particularly in southern regions. These results highlight the importance of large-scale studies of keystone species, which can underscore the hidden effects of climate warming on freshwater ecosystems.
  • Silva, Ximena; Roux, Jolanda; Asiegbu, Fred O. (2020)
    Background and objectives: The global forest economy is threatened by eucalypt pathogens which are often latent or cryptic species that escape common quarantine and detection methods. Plantation forestry using eucalypts is of considerable importance to Paraguay, but knowledge regarding the pests and diseases affecting these plantations is limited. This study identified fungal diseases present in these plantations. Materials and Methods: We surveyed eucalypt plantations in four provinces in Paraguay and collected material from diseased trees for identification of the causal agents. The samples were analyzed using a combination of morphological and molecular methods. Results: Diseases encountered included Botryosphaeria stem canker, Calonectria leaf blight, Chrysoporthe stem canker, myrtle/eucalypt rust, Coniella leaf spot, heartwood rot and Teratosphaeria stem canker. Contrary to expectations, the causal agent of Teratosphaeria stem canker was identified as Teratosphaeria zuluensis (M.J. Wingf., Crous & T.A. Cout.) M.J. Wingf. & Crous and not Teratosphaeria gauchensis (M.-N. Cortinas, Crous & M.J. Wingf.) M.J. Wingf. & Crous, that is commonly documented for the South American region. Conclusions: This study updates the knowledge on forest fungal pathogens in Paraguayan eucalypt plantations and is the first report of T. zuluensis in Paraguay and in South America.
  • Li, Yuhong; Su, Xiang; Ding, Aaron Yi; Lindgren, Anders; Liu, Xiaoli; Prehofer, Christian; Riekki, Jukka; Rahmani, Rahim; Tarkoma, Sasu; Hui, Pan (2020)
    The Internet of Things (IoT) connects smart devices to enable various intelligent services. The deployment of IoT encounters several challenges, such as difficulties in controlling and managing IoT applications and networks, problems in programming existing IoT devices, long service provisioning time, underused resources, as well as complexity, isolation and scalability, among others. One fundamental concern is that current IoT networks lack flexibility and intelligence. A network-wide flexible control and management are missing in IoT networks. In addition, huge numbers of devices and large amounts of data are involved in IoT, but none of them have been tuned for supporting network management and control. In this paper, we argue that Software-defined Networking (SDN) together with the data generated by IoT applications can enhance the control and management of IoT in terms of flexibility and intelligence. We present a review for the evolution of SDN and IoT and analyze the benefits and challenges brought by the integration of SDN and IoT with the help of IoT data. We discuss the perspectives of knowledge-driven SDN for IoT through a new IoT architecture and illustrate how to realize Industry IoT by using the architecture. We also highlight the challenges and future research works toward realizing IoT with the knowledge-driven SDN.
  • Cuthbert, Ross N.; Pattison, Zarah; Taylor, Nigel G.; Verbrugge, Laura; Diagne, Christophe; Ahmed, Danish A.; Leroy, Boris; Angulo, Elena; Briski, Elizabeta; Capinha, Cesar; Catford, Jane A.; Dalu, Tatenda; Essl, Franz; Gozlan, Rodolphe E.; Haubrock, Phillip J.; Kourantidou, Melina; Kramer, Andrew M.; Renault, David; Wasserman, Ryan J.; Courchamp, Franck (2021)
    Much research effort has been invested in understanding ecological impacts of invasive alien species (IAS) across ecosystems and taxonomic groups, but empirical studies about economic effects lack synthesis. Using a comprehensive global database, we determine patterns and trends in economic costs of aquatic IAS by examining: (i) the distribution of these costs across taxa, geographic regions and cost types; (ii) the temporal dynamics of global costs; and (iii) knowledge gaps, especially compared to terrestrial IAS. Based on the costs recorded from the existing literature, the global cost of aquatic IAS conservatively summed to US$345 billion, with the majority attributed to invertebrates (62%), followed by vertebrates (28%), then plants (6%). The largest costs were reported in North America (48%) and Asia (13%), and were principally a result of resource damages (74%); only 6% of recorded costs were from management. The magnitude and number of reported costs were highest in the United States of America and for semi-aquatic taxa. Many countries and known aquatic alien species had no reported costs, especially in Africa and Asia. Accordingly, a network analysis revealed limited connectivity among countries, indicating disparate cost reporting. Aquatic IAS costs have increased in recent decades by several orders of magnitude, reaching at least US$23 billion in 2020. Costs are likely considerably underrepresented compared to terrestrial IAS; only 5% of reported costs were from aquatic species, despite 26% of known invaders being aquatic. Additionally, only 1% of aquatic invasion costs were from marine species. Costs of aquatic IAS are thus substantial, but likely underreported. Costs have increased over time and are expected to continue rising with future invasions. We urge increased and improved cost reporting by managers, practitioners and researchers to reduce knowledge gaps. Few costs are proactive investments; increased management spending is urgently needed to prevent and limit current and future aquatic IAS damages. (c) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
  • Xu, Tianwei; Hanson, Linda L. Magnusson; Lange, Theis; Starkopf, Liis; Westerlund, Hugo; Madsen, Ida E. H.; Rugulies, Reiner; Pentti, Jaana; Stenholm, Sari; Vahtera, Jussi; Hansen, Ase M.; Kivimaki, Mika; Rod, Naja H. (2018)
    The aim of this multicohort study was to examine whether employees exposed to social stressors at work, such as workplace bullying and violence, have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The study included 45,905 men and women (40-65 years of age and free of diabetes at baseline) from four studies in Sweden, Denmark and Finland. Workplace bullying and violence were self-reported at baseline. Incident diabetes was ascertained through national health and medication records and death registers. Marginal structural Cox models adjusted for age, sex, country of birth, marital status and educational level were used for the analyses. Nine per cent of the population reported being bullied at work and 12% were exposed to workplace violence or threats of violence. Bullied participants had a 1.46 (95% CI 1.23, 1.74) times higher risk of developing diabetes compared with non-bullied participants. Exposure to violence or threats of violence was also associated with a higher risk of diabetes (HR 1.26 [95% CI 1.02, 1.56]). The risk estimates attenuated slightly when taking BMI into account, especially for bullying. The results were similar for men and women, and were consistent across cohorts. We found a higher risk of incident type 2 diabetes among employees exposed to bullying or violence in the workplace. Further research is needed to determine whether policies to reduce bullying and violence at work may reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes in working populations. Research on the mechanisms is also highly warranted.
  • Xu, Tianwei; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.; Lange, Theis; Starkopf, Liis; Westerlund, Hugo; Madsen, Ida E. H.; Rugulies, Reiner; Pentti, Jaana; Stenholm, Sari; Vahtera, Jussi; Hansen, Ase M.; Virtanen, Marianna; Kivimäki, Mika; Rod, Naja H. (2019)
    Aims To assess the associations between bullying and violence at work and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods and results Participants were 79201 working men and women, aged 18-65years and free of CVD and were sourced from three cohort studies from Sweden and Denmark. Exposure to workplace bullying and violence was measured at baseline using self-reports. Participants were linked to nationwide health and death registers to ascertain incident CVD, including coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Study-specific results were estimated by marginal structural Cox regression and were combined using fixed-effect meta-analysis. Nine percent reported being bullied at work and 13% recorded exposure to workplace violence during the past year. We recorded 3229 incident CVD cases with a mean follow-up of 12.4years (765 in the first 4years). After adjustment for age, sex, country of birth, marital status, and educational level, being bullied at work vs. not was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.59 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-1.98] for CVD. Experiencing workplace violence vs. not was associated with a HR of 1.25 (95% CI 1.12-1.40) for CVD. The population attributable risk was 5.0% for workplace bullying and 3.1% for workplace violence. The excess risk remained similar in analyses with different follow-up lengths, cardiovascular risk stratifications, and after additional adjustments. Dose-response relations were observed for both workplace bullying and violence (P-trend <0.001). There was only negligible heterogeneity in study-specific estimates. Conclusion Bullying and violence are common at workplaces and those exposed to these stressors are at higher risk of CVD.