Browsing by Subject "TRAITS"

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  • Weiss, Alexander; Baselmans, Bart M. L.; Hofer, Edith; Yang, Jingyun; Okbay, Aysu; Lind, Penelope A.; Miller, Mike B.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Zhao, Wei; Hagenaars, Saskia P.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Matteson, Lindsay K.; Snieder, Harold; Faul, Jessica D.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Boyle, Patricia A.; Tiemeier, Henning; Mosing, Miriam A.; Pattie, Alison; Davies, Gail; Liewald, David C.; Schmidt, Reinhold; De Jager, Philip L.; Heath, Andrew C.; Jokela, Markus; Starr, John M.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Johannesson, Magnus; Cesarini, David; Hofman, Albert; Harris, Sarah E.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Schmidt, Helena; Smith, Jacqui; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt; Bennett, David A.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Deary, Ian J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bartels, Meike; Luciano, Michelle (2016)
    Approximately half of the variation in wellbeing measures overlaps with variation in personality traits. Studies of non-human primate pedigrees and human twins suggest that this is due to common genetic influences. We tested whether personality polygenic scores for the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) domains and for item response theory (IRT) derived extraversion and neuroticism scores predict variance in wellbeing measures. Polygenic scores were based on published genome-wide association (GWA) results in over 17,000 individuals for the NEO-FFI and in over 63,000 for the IRT extraversion and neuroticism traits. The NEO-FFI polygenic scores were used to predict life satisfaction in 7 cohorts, positive affect in 12 cohorts, and general wellbeing in 1 cohort (maximal N = 46,508). Meta-analysis of these results showed no significant association between NEO-FFI personality polygenic scores and the wellbeing measures. IRT extraversion and neuroticism polygenic scores were used to predict life satisfaction and positive affect in almost 37,000 individuals from UK Biobank. Significant positive associations (effect sizes
  • Pausch, Hubert; Venhoranta, Heli; Wurmser, Christine; Hakala, Kalle; Iso-Touru, Terhi; Sironen, Anu; Vingborg, Rikke K.; Lohi, Hannes; Soderquist, Lennart; Fries, Ruedi; Andersson, Magnus (2016)
    Background: Artificial insemination is widely used in many cattle breeding programs. Semen samples of breeding bulls are collected and closely examined immediately after collection at artificial insemination centers. Only ejaculates without anomalous findings are retained for artificial insemination. Although morphological aberrations of the spermatozoa are a frequent reason for discarding ejaculates, the genetic determinants underlying poor semen quality are scarcely understood. Results: A tail stump sperm defect was observed in three bulls of the Swedish Red cattle breed. The spermatozoa of affected bulls were immotile because of severely disorganized tails indicating disturbed spermatogenesis. We genotyped three affected bulls and 18 unaffected male half-sibs at 46,035 SNPs and performed homozygosity mapping to map the fertility disorder to an 8.42 Mb interval on bovine chromosome 13. The analysis of whole-genome re-sequencing data of an affected bull and 300 unaffected animals from eleven cattle breeds other than Swedish Red revealed a 1 bp deletion (Chr13: 24,301,425 bp, ss1815612719) in the eleventh exon of the armadillo repeat containing 3-encoding gene (ARMC3) that was compatible with the supposed recessive mode of inheritance. The deletion is expected to alter the reading frame and to induce premature translation termination (p.A451fs26). The mutated protein is shortened by 401 amino acids (46 %) and lacks domains that are likely essential for normal protein function. Conclusions: We report the phenotypic and genetic characterization of a sterilizing tail stump sperm defect in the Swedish Red cattle breed. Exploiting high-density genotypes and massive re-sequencing data enabled us to identify the most likely causal mutation for the fertility disorder in bovine ARMC3. Our results provide the basis for monitoring the mutated variant in the Swedish Red cattle population and for the early identification of infertile animals.
  • Littrell, John; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Baud, Amelie; Rastas, Pasi; Solberg-Woods, Leah; Flister, Michael J. (2018)
    An accurate and high-resolution genetic map is critical for mapping complex traits, yet the resolution of the current rat genetic map is far lower than human and mouse, and has not been updated since the original Jensen-Seaman map in 2004. For the first time, we have refined the rat genetic map to sub-centimorgan (cM) resolution (
  • Bhutta, Mahmood F.; Lambie, Jane; Hobson, Lindsey; Goel, Anuj; Hafren, Lena; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Mattila, Petri S.; Farrall, Martin; Brown, Steve; Burton, Martin J. (2017)
    Chronic otitis media with effusion (COME) is the most common cause of hearing loss in children, and known to have high heritability. Mutant mouse models have identified Fbxo11, Evi1, Tgif1, and Nisch as potential risk loci. We recruited children aged 10 and under undergoing surgical treatment for COME from 35 hospitals in the UK, and their nuclear family. We performed association testing with the loci FBXO11, EVI1, TGIF1 and NISCH and sought to replicate significant results in a case-control cohort from Finland. We tested 1296 families (3828 individuals), and found strength of association with the T allele at rs881835 (p = 0.006, OR 1.39) and the G allele at rs1962914 (p = 0.007, OR 1.58) at TGIF1, and the A allele at rs10490302 (p = 0.016, OR 1.17) and the G allele at rs2537742 (p = 0.038, OR 1.16) at FBXO11. Results were not replicated. This study supports smaller studies that have also suggested association of otitis media with polymorphism at FBX011, but this is the first study to report association with the locus TGIF1. Both FBX011 and TGIF1 are involved in TGF-beta signalling, suggesting this pathway may be important in the transition from acute to chronic middle ear inflammation, and a potential molecular target.
  • Koskinen, Lotta L. E.; Seppala, Eija H.; Weissl, Jutta; Jokinen, Tarja S.; Viitmaa, Ranno; Hanninen, Reetta L.; Quignon, Pascale; Fischer, Andrea; Andre, Catherine; Lohi, Hannes (2017)
    Background: Idiopathic or genetic adult-onset epilepsy is a common neurological disorder in domestic dogs. Genetic association has been reported only with ADAM23 on CFA 37 in few breeds. To identify novel epilepsy genes, we performed genome-wide association (GWA) analyses in four new breeds, and investigated the association of the previously reported ADAM23 haplotype with the epilepsy phenotype in eight breeds. Results: GWA analysis did not reveal new epilepsy loci. ADAM23 association (p <0.05) was identified in five breeds. Combined analysis of all eight breeds showed significant association (p = 4.6e(-6), OR 1.9). Conclusions: Our results further support the role of ADAM23 in multiple breeds as a common risk gene for epilepsy with low penetrance. The lack of findings in the GWA analyses points towards inefficient capture of genetic variation by the current SNP arrays, causal variant(s) with low penetrance and possible phenocopies. Future work will include studies on ADAM23 function and expression in canine neurons, as well as whole-genome sequencing in order to identify additional IE genes.
  • Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium; Ni, Guiyan; Gratten, Jacob; Wray, Naomi R.; Lee, Sang Hong; Eriksson, Johan Gunnar; Paunio, Tiina Maria; Pietiläinen, Olli Kalevi; Palotie, Aarno Veikko (2018)
    Previous studies have shown an increased risk for mental health problems in children born to both younger and older parents compared to children of average-aged parents. We previously used a novel design to reveal a latent mechanism of genetic association between schizophrenia and age at first birth in women (AFB). Here, we use independent data from the UK Biobank (N = 38,892) to replicate the finding of an association between predicted genetic risk of schizophrenia and AFB in women, and to estimate the genetic correlation between schizophrenia and AFB in women stratified into younger and older groups. We find evidence for an association between predicted genetic risk of schizophrenia and AFB in women (P-value = 1.12E-05), and we show genetic heterogeneity between younger and older AFB groups (P-value = 3.45E-03). The genetic correlation between schizophrenia and AFB in the younger AFB group is -0.16 (SE = 0.04) while that between schizophrenia and AFB in the older AFB group is 0.14 (SE = 0.08). Our results suggest that early, and perhaps also late, age at first birth in women is associated with increased genetic risk for schizophrenia in the UK Biobank sample. These findings contribute new insights into factors contributing to the complex bio-social risk architecture underpinning the association between parental age and offspring mental health.
  • Jelenkovic, Aline; Mikkonen, Janne; Martikainen, Pekka; Latvala, Antti; Yokoyama, Yoshie; Sund, Reijo; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Rebato, Esther; Sung, Joohon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Jooyeon; Lee, Sooji; Stazi, Maria A.; Fagnani, Corrado; Brescianini, Sonia; Derom, Catherine A.; Vlietinck, Robert F.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Krueger, Robert F.; Mcgue, Matt; Pahlen, Shandell; Nelson, Tracy L.; Whitfield, Keith E.; Brandt, Ingunn; Nilsen, Thomas S.; Harris, Jennifer R.; Cutler, Tessa L.; Hopper, John L.; Tarnoki, Adam D.; Tarnoki, David L.; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Silventoinen, Karri (2018)
    Background There is evidence that birth weight is positively associated with education, but it remains unclear whether this association is explained by familial environmental factors, genetic factors or the intrauterine environment. We analysed the association between birth weight and educational years within twin pairs, which controls for genetic factors and the environment shared between co-twins. Methods The data were derived from nine twin cohorts in eight countries including 6116 complete twin pairs. The association between birth weight and educational attainment was analysed both between individuals and within pairs using linear regression analyses. Results In between-individual analyses, birth weight was not associated with educational years. Within-pairs analyses revealed positive but modest associations for some sex, zygosity and birth year groups. The greatest association was found in dizygotic (DZ) men (0.65 educational years/kg birth weight, p=0.006); smaller effects of 0.3 educational years/kg birth weight were found within monozygotic (MZ) twins of both sexes and opposite-sex DZ twins. The magnitude of the associations differed by birth year in MZ women and opposite-sex DZ twins, showing a positive association in the 1915-1959 birth cohort but no association in the 1960-1984 birth cohort. Conclusion Although associations are weak and somewhat inconsistent, our results suggest that intrauterine environment may play a role when explaining the association between birth weight and educational attainment.
  • Piirtola, Maarit; Jelenkovic, Aline; Latvala, Antti; Sund, Reijo; Korhonen, Maila Tellervo; Kaprio, Jaakko; Silventoinen, Karri; collaboration group, CODATwins (2018)
    Background Smokers tend to weigh less than never smokers, while successful quitting leads to an increase in body weight. Because smokers and non-smokers may differ in genetic and environmental family background, we analysed data from twin pairs in which the co-twins differed by their smoking behaviour to evaluate if the association between smoking and body mass index (BMI) remains after controlling for family background. Methods and findings The international CODATwins database includes information on smoking and BMI measured between 1960 and 2012 from 156,593 twin individuals 18–69 years of age. Individual-based data (230,378 measurements) and data of smoking discordant twin pairs (altogether 30,014 pairwise measurements, 36% from monozygotic [MZ] pairs) were analysed with linear fixed-effects regression models by 10-year periods. In MZ pairs, the smoking co-twin had, on average, 0.57 kg/m2 lower BMI in men (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49, 0.70) and 0.65 kg/m2 lower BMI in women (95% CI: 0.52, 0.79) than the never smoking co-twin. Former smokers had 0.70 kg/m2 higher BMI among men (95% CI: 0.63, 0.78) and 0.62 kg/m2 higher BMI among women (95% CI: 0.51, 0.73) than their currently smoking MZ co-twins. Little difference in BMI was observed when comparing former smoking co-twins with their never smoking MZ co-twins (0.13 kg/m2, 95% CI 0.04, 0.23 among men; -0.04 kg/m2, 95% CI -0.16, 0.09 among women). The associations were similar within dizygotic pairs and when analysing twins as individuals. The observed series of cross-sectional associations were independent of sex, age, and measurement decade. Conclusions Smoking is associated with lower BMI and smoking cessation with higher BMI. However, the net effect of smoking and subsequent cessation on weight development appears to be minimal, i.e. never more than an average of 0.7 kg/m2.
  • Belachew, Kiflemariam Y.; Nagel, Kerstin A.; Poorter, Hendrik; Stoddard, Frederick L. (2019)
    Water deficit may occur at any stage of plant growth, with any intensity and duration. Phenotypic acclimation and the mechanism of adaptation vary with the evolutionary background of germplasm accessions and their stage of growth. Faba bean is considered sensitive to various kinds of drought. Hence, we conducted a greenhouse experiment in rhizotrons under contrasting watering regimes to explore shoot and root traits and drought avoidance mechanisms in young faba bean plants. Eight accessions were investigated for shoot and root morphological and physiological responses in two watering conditions with four replications. Pre-germinated seedlings were transplanted into rhizotron boxes filled with either air-dried or moist peat. The water-limited plants received 50-ml water at transplanting and another 50-ml water 4 days later, then no water was given until the end of the experimental period, 24 days after transplanting. The well-watered plants received 100 ml of water every 12 h throughout the experimental period. Root, stem, and leaf dry mass, their mass fractions, their dry matter contents, apparent specific root length and density, stomatal conductance, SPAD value, and Fv/Fm were recorded. Water deficit resulted in 3–4-fold reductions in shoot biomass, root biomass, and stomatal conductance along with 1.2–1.4-fold increases in leaf and stem dry matter content and SPAD values. Total dry mass and apparent root length density showed accession by treatment interactions. Accessions DS70622, DS11320, and ILB938/2 shared relatively high values of total dry mass and low values of stomatal conductance under water deficit but differed in root distribution parameters. In both treatments, DS70622 was characterized by finer roots that were distributed in both depth and width, whereas DS11320 and ILB938/2 produced less densely growing, thicker roots. French accession Mélodie/2 was susceptible to drought in the vegetative phase, in contrast to previous results from the flowering phase, showing the importance of timing of drought stress on the measured response. Syrian accession DS70622 explored the maximum root volume and maintained its dry matter production, with the difference from the other accessions being particularly large in the water-limited treatment, so it is a valuable source of traits for avoiding transient drought.
  • Oksman, Elli; Rosenström, Tom; Gluschkoff, Kia; Saarinen, Aino; Hintsanen, Mirka; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Viikari, Jorma; Raitakari, Olli Tuomas; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa (2019)
    Sociability is a widely studied trait that has been linked both with individual well-and ill-being. Although early childcare has been shown to affect social competence in children, its role in the development of different aspects of adulthood sociability is poorly understood. Using a longitudinal population-based sample (N = 464), this study investigated whether childcare arrangements at ages 3 or 6 are associated with self-reported adulthood sociability at ages 20 to 35 years. A total of five aspects of sociability were measured using three well-established personality inventories (EAS, NEO-FFI, and TCI). Multilevel modeling was applied to examine the association between early care and adulthood sociability, adjusting for several sources of random variation (between-individual variance, within-individual variance between measurement times, variance between used sociability indicators, and error variance that cannot be attributed to the previously mentioned) and potential confounders (disruptive behavior in childhood, parental socio-economic status, parent-child relationship quality, maternal age, and the number of children in the family). Based on our results, in comparison to home care, family daycare and center-based daycare at age 3 and center-based daycare at age 6 were associated with higher sociability later in life. The association was strongest for aspects of sociability that emphasize the willingness to be surrounded by other people and to be attached to them. In other words, characteristics of early care may contribute uniquely to the development of these aspects of sociability with effects that persist into adult life
  • Within-family Consortium; 23andMe Res Team; Brumpton, Ben; Sanderson, Eleanor; Heilbron, Karl; Kaprio, Jaakko; Davies, Neil M. (2020)
    Estimates from Mendelian randomization studies of unrelated individuals can be biased due to uncontrolled confounding from familial effects. Here we describe methods for within-family Mendelian randomization analyses and use simulation studies to show that family-based analyses can reduce such biases. We illustrate empirically how familial effects can affect estimates using data from 61,008 siblings from the Nord-TrOndelag Health Study and UK Biobank and replicated our findings using 222,368 siblings from 23andMe. Both Mendelian randomization estimates using unrelated individuals and within family methods reproduced established effects of lower BMI reducing risk of diabetes and high blood pressure. However, while Mendelian randomization estimates from samples of unrelated individuals suggested that taller height and lower BMI increase educational attainment, these effects were strongly attenuated in within-family Mendelian randomization analyses. Our findings indicate the necessity of controlling for population structure and familial effects in Mendelian randomization studies. Family-based study designs have been applied to resolve confounding by population stratification, dynastic effects and assortative mating in genetic association analyses. Here, Brumpton et al. describe theory and simulations for overcoming such biases in Mendelian randomization through within-family studies.
  • Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Vecchione, Michele; Schwartz, Shalom H.; Schoen, Harald; Bain, Paul G.; Silvester, Jo; Cieciuch, Jan; Pavlopoulos, Vassilis; Bianchi, Gabriel; Kirmanoglu, Hasan; Baslevent, Cem; Mamali, Catalin; Manzi, Jorge; Katayama, Miyuki; Posnova, Tetyana; Tabernero, Carmen; Torres, Claudio; Verkasalo, Markku; Lonnqvist, Jan-Erik; Vondrakova, Eva; Giovanna Caprara, Maria (2017)
    The current study examines the contribution of left-right (or liberal-conservative) ideology to voting, as well as the extent to which basic values account for ideological orientation. Analyses were conducted in 16 countries from five continents (Europe, North America, South America, Asia, and Oceania), most of which have been neglected by previous studies. Results showed that left-right (or liberal-conservative) ideology predicted voting in all countries except Ukraine. Basic values exerted a considerable effect in predicting ideology in most countries, especially in established democracies such as Australia, Finland, Italy, United Kingdom, and Germany. Pattern of relations with the whole set of 10 values revealed that the critical trade-off underlying ideology is between values concerned with tolerance and protection for the welfare of all people (universalism) versus values concerned with preserving the social order and status quo (security). A noteworthy exception was found in European postcommunist countries, where relations of values with ideology were small (Poland) or near to zero (Ukraine, Slovakia).
  • Pirinen, Matti; Benner, Christian; Marttinen, Pekka; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Rivas, Manuel A.; Ripatti, Samuli (2017)
    Genetic research utilizes a decomposition of trait variances and covariances into genetic and environmental parts. Our software package biMM is a computationally efficient implementation of a bivariate linear mixed model for settings where hundreds of traits have been measured on partially overlapping sets of individuals.
  • Ge, Jielin; Berg, Björn; Xie, Zongqiang (2019)
    Abstract Evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved tree species can coexist across the globe and constitute different broad-leaved forests along large-scale geographical and climatic gradients. A better understanding of climatic influence on the distribution of mixed evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved forest is of fundamental importance when assessing this mixed forest's resilience and predicting potential dynamics of broad-leaved forests under future climate change. Here, we quantified the horizontal distribution of this mixed forest in mountains in relation to climate seasonality by compiling vegetation information from the earlier records and our own field sampling on major subtropical mountains of China. We found that the probability of occurrence of this forest in subtropical mountains was positively associated with the latitude but not the longitude. The occurrence probability of this forest was observed at high-temperature but not precipitation seasonality mountains. Temperature seasonality was five times more important than precipitation seasonality in explaining the total variation of occurrence of this mixed forest. For its distribution, our results shed light on that temperature seasonality was generally a more powerful predictor than precipitation seasonality for montane mixed forest distribution. Collectively, this study clearly underscores the important role of temperature seasonality, a previously not quantified climatic variable, in the occurrence of this mixed forest along geographical gradients and hence yields useful insight into our understanding of climate?vegetation relationships and climate change vulnerability assessment in a changing climate.
  • Byers, Kelsey J. R. P.; Darragh, Kathy; Fernanda Garza, Sylvia; Abondano Almeida, Diana; Warren, Ian A.; Rastas, Pasi M. A.; Merrill, Richard M.; Schulz, Stefan; McMillan, W. Owen; Jiggins, Chris D. (2021)
    The degree to which loci promoting reproductive isolation cluster in the genome-that is, the genetic architecture of reproductive isolation-can influence the tempo and mode of speciation. Tight linkage between these loci can facilitate speciation in the face of gene flow. Pheromones play a role in reproductive isolation in many Lepidoptera species, and the role of endogenously produced compounds as secondary metabolites decreases the likelihood of pleiotropy associated with many barrier loci. Heliconius butterflies use male sex pheromones to both court females (aphrodisiac wing pheromones) and ward off male courtship (male-transferred antiaphrodisiac genital pheromones), and it is likely that these compounds play a role in reproductive isolation between Heliconius species. Using a set of backcross hybrids between H. melpomene and H. cydno, we investigated the genetic architecture of putative male pheromone compound production. We found a set of 40 significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) representing 33 potential pheromone compounds. QTL clustered significantly on two chromosomes, chromosome 8 for genital compounds and chromosome 20 for wing compounds, and chromosome 20 was enriched for potential pheromone biosynthesis genes. There was minimal overlap between pheromone QTL and known QTL for mate choice and color pattern. Nonetheless, we did detect linkage between a QTL for wing androconial area and optix, a color pattern locus known to play a role in reproductive isolation in these species. This tight clustering of putative pheromone loci might contribute to coincident reproductive isolating barriers, facilitating speciation despite ongoing gene flow.
  • Galbrun, Esther; Tang, Hui; Fortelius, Mikael; Zliobaite, Indre (2018)
    As organisms are adapted to their environments, assemblages of taxa can be used to describe environments in the present and in the past. Here, we use a data mining method, namely redescription mining, to discover and analyze patterns of association between large herbivorous mammals and their environments via their functional traits. We focus on functional properties of animal teeth, characterized using a recently developed dental trait scoring scheme. The teeth of herbivorous mammals serve as an interface to obtain energy from food, and are therefore expected to match the types of plant food available in their environment. Hence, dental traits are expected to carry a signal of environmental conditions. We analyze a global compilation of occurrences of large herbivorous mammals and of bioclimatic conditions. We identify common patterns of association between dental traits distributions and bioclimatic conditions and discuss their implications. Each pattern can be considered as a computational biome. Our analysis distinguishes three global zones, which we refer to as the boreal-temperate moist zone, the tropical moist zone and the tropical-subtropical dry zone. The boreal-temperate moist zone is mainly characterized by seasonal cold temperatures, a lack of hypsodonty and a high share of species with obtuse lophs. The tropical moist zone is mainly characterized by high temperatures, high isothermality, abundant precipitation and a high share of species with acute rather than obtuse lophs. Finally, the tropical dry zone is mainly characterized by a high seasonality of temperatures and precipitation, as well as high hypsodonty and horizodonty. We find that the dental traits signature of African rain forests is quite different from the signature of climatically similar sites in North America and Asia, where hypsodont species and species with obtuse lophs are mostly absent. In terms of climate and dental signatures, the African seasonal tropics share many similarities with Central-South Asian sites. Interestingly, the Tibetan plateau is covered both by redescriptions from the tropical-subtropical dry group and by redescriptions from the boreal-temperate moist group, suggesting a combination of features from both zones in its dental traits and climate.
  • Parravicini, Valeriano; Casey, Jordan M.; Schiettekatte, Nina M. D.; Brandl, Simon J.; Pozas-Schacre, Chloe; Carlot, Jeremy; Edgar, Graham J.; Graham, Nicholas A. J.; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille; Kulbicki, Michel; Strona, Giovanni; Stuart-Smith, Rick D. (2020)
    Understanding species' roles in food webs requires an accurate assessment of their trophic niche. However, it is challenging to delineate potential trophic interactions across an ecosystem, and a paucity of empirical information often leads to inconsistent definitions of trophic guilds based on expert opinion, especially when applied to hyperdiverse ecosystems. Using coral reef fishes as a model group, we show that experts disagree on the assignment of broad trophic guilds for more than 20% of species, which hampers comparability across studies. Here, we propose a quantitative, unbiased, and reproducible approach to define trophic guilds and apply recent advances in machine learning to predict probabilities of pairwise trophic interactions with high accuracy. We synthesize data from community-wide gut content analyses of tropical coral reef fishes worldwide, resulting in diet information from 13,961 individuals belonging to 615 reef fish. We then use network analysis to identify 8 trophic guilds and Bayesian phylogenetic modeling to show that trophic guilds can be predicted based on phylogeny and maximum body size. Finally, we use machine learning to test whether pairwise trophic interactions can be predicted with accuracy. Our models achieved a misclassification error of less than 5%, indicating that our approach results in a quantitative and reproducible trophic categorization scheme, as well as high-resolution probabilities of trophic interactions. By applying our framework to the most diverse vertebrate consumer group, we show that it can be applied to other organismal groups to advance reproducibility in trait-based ecology. Our work thus provides a viable approach to account for the complexity of predator-prey interactions in highly diverse ecosystems.
  • Silventoinen, Karri; Jelenkovic, Aline; Sund, Reijo; Yokoyama, Yoshie; Hur, Yoon-Mi; Cozen, Wendy; Hwang, Amie E.; Mack, Thomas M.; Honda, Chika; Inui, Fujio; Iwatani, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Mikio; Tomizawa, Rie; Pietilainen, Kirsi H.; Rissanen, Aila; Siribaddana, Sisira H.; Hotopf, Matthew; Sumathipala, Athula; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Tan, Qihua; Zhang, Dongfeng; Pang, Zengchang; Piirtola, Maarit; Aaltonen, Sari; Oncel, Sevgi Y.; Aliev, Fazil; Rebato, Esther; Hjelmborg, Jacob B.; Christensen, Kaare; Skytthe, Axel; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Silberg, Judy L.; Eaves, Lindon J.; Cutler, Tessa L.; Ordonana, Juan R.; Sanchez-Romera, Juan F.; Colodro-Conde, Lucia; Song, Yun-Mi; Yang, Sarah; Lee, Kayoung; Franz, Carol E.; Kremen, William S.; Lyons, Michael J.; Busjahn, Andreas; Nelson, Tracy L.; Whitfield, Keith E.; Kandler, Christian; Jang, Kerry L.; Gatz, Margaret; Butler, David A.; Stazi, Maria A.; Fagnani, Corrado; D'Ippolito, Cristina; Duncan, Glen E.; Buchwald, Dedra; Martin, Nicholas G.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Jeong, Hoe-Uk; Swan, Gary E.; Krasnow, Ruth; Magnusson, Patrik Ke; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Aslan, Anna K. Dahl; McAdams, Tom A.; Eley, Thalia C.; Gregory, Alice M.; Tynelius, Per; Baker, Laura A.; Tuvblad, Catherine; Bayasgalan, Gombojav; Narandalai, Danshiitsoodol; Spector, Timothy D.; Mangino, Massimo; Lachance, Genevieve; Burt, S. Alexandra; Klump, Kelly L.; Harris, Jennifer R.; Brandt, Ingunn; Nilsen, Thomas S.; Krueger, Robert F.; Mcgue, Matt; Pahlen, Shandell; Corley, Robin P.; Huibregtse, Brooke M.; Bartels, Meike; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E. M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Goldberg, Jack H.; Rasmussen, Finn; Tarnoki, Adam D.; Tarnoki, David L.; Derom, Catherine A.; Vlietinck, Robert F.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Hopper, John L.; Sung, Joohon; Maes, Hermine H.; Turkheimer, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Kaprio, Jaakko (2017)
    Background: Genes and the environment contribute to variation in adult body mass index [BMI (in kg/m(2))], but factors modifying these variance components are poorly understood. Objective: We analyzed genetic and environmental variation in BMI between men and women from young adulthood to old age from the 1940s to the 2000s and between cultural-geographic regions representing high (North America and Australia), moderate (Europe), and low (East Asia) prevalence of obesity. Design: We used genetic structural equation modeling to analyze BMI in twins >= 20 y of age from 40 cohorts representing 20 countries (140,379 complete twin pairs). Results: The heritability of BMI decreased from 0.77 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.78) and 0.75 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.75) in men and women 2029 y of age to 0.57 (95% CI: 0.54, 0.60) and 0.59 (95% CI: 0.53, 0.65) in men 70-79 y of age and women 80 y of age, respectively. The relative influence of unique environmental factors correspondingly increased. Differences in the sets of genes affecting BMI in men and women increased from 20-29 to 60-69 y of age. Mean BMI and variances in BMI increased from the 1940s to the 2000s and were greatest in North America and Australia, followed by Europe and East Asia. However, heritability estimates were largely similar over measurement years and between regions. There was no evidence of environmental factors shared by co-twins affecting BMI. Conclusions: The heritability of BMI decreased and differences in the sets of genes affecting BMI in men and women increased from young adulthood to old age. The heritability of BMI was largely similar between cultural-geographic regions and measurement years, despite large differences in mean BMI and variances in BMI. Our results show a strong influence of genetic factors on BMI, especially in early adulthood, regardless of the obesity level in the population.
  • Surendran, Praveen; Feofanova, Elena; Lahrouchi, Najim; Ntalla, Ioanna; Karthikeyan, Savita; Cook, James; Chen, Lingyan; Mifsud, Borbala; Yao, Chen; Kraja, Aldi T.; Cartwright, James H.; Hellwege, Jacklyn N.; Giri, Ayush; Tragante, Vinicius; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Liu, Dajiang J.; Prins, Bram P.; Stewart, Isobel D.; Cabrera, Claudia P.; Eales, James M.; Akbarov, Artur; Auer, Paul L.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Bis, Joshua C.; Braithwaite, Vickie S.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Daw, E. Warwick; Warren, Helen R.; Drenos, Fotios; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Faul, Jessica D.; Fauman, Eric B.; Fava, Cristiano; Ferreira, Teresa; Foley, Christopher N.; Franceschini, Nora; Gao, He; Giannakopoulou, Olga; Giulianini, Franco; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Guo, Xiuqing; Harris, Sarah E.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Helgadottir, Anna; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kontto, Jukka; Larson, Martin G.; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lindström, Jaana; Lotta, Luca A.; Lu, Yingchang; Luan, Jian'an; Mahajan, Anubha; Malerba, Giovanni; Masca, Nicholas G. D.; Mei, Hao; Menni, Cristina; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Mosen-Ansorena, David; Muller-Nurasyid, Martina; Pare, Guillaume; Paul, Dirk S.; Perola, Markus; Poveda, Alaitz; Rauramaa, Rainer; Richard, Melissa; Richardson, Tom G.; Sepulveda, Nuno; Sim, Xueling; Smith, Albert; Smith, Jennifer A.; Staley, James R.; Stanakova, Alena; Sulem, Patrick; Theriault, Sebastien; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Trompet, Stella; Varga, Tibor V.; Edwards, Digna R. Velez; Veronesi, Giovanni; Weiss, Stefan; Willems, Sara M.; Yao, Jie; Young, Robin; Yu, Bing; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing-Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Wei; Evangelou, Evangelos; Aeschbacher, Stefanie; Asllanaj, Eralda; Blankenberg, Stefan; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Braund, Peter S.; Burgess, Stephen; Cho, Kelly; Christensen, Cramer; Connell, John; de Mutsert, Renee; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Dorr, Marcus; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Gaziano, J. Michael; Grarup, Niels; Grove, Megan L.; Hallmans, Goran; Hansen, Torben; Have, Christian T.; Heiss, Gerardo; Jorgensen, Marit E.; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kajantie, Eero; Kamat, Mihir; Karajamaki, AnneMari; Karpe, Fredrik; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lannfelt, Lars; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Linneberg, Allan; Martin, Lisa W.; Moitry, Marie; Nadkarni, Girish; Neville, Matt J.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Pedersen, Oluf; Peters, James; Poulter, Neil; Rasheed, Asif; Rasmussen, Katrine L.; Rayner, N. William; Magi, Reedik; Renstrom, Frida; Rettig, Rainer; Rossouw, Jacques; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Sever, Peter S.; Sigurdsson, Emil L.; Skaaby, Tea; Sun, Yan; Sundstrom, Johan; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Esko, Tonu; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Tsao, Philip S.; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Turner, Stephen T.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Willer, Cristen J.; Wilson, Peter W. F.; Witte, Daniel R.; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Zhang, He; Aliya, Naheed; Almgren, Peter; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Barnes, Michael R.; Blakemore, Alexandra; Boehnke, Michael; Bots, Michiel L.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Buring, Julie E.; Chambers, John C.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Conen, David; Correa, Adolfo; Smith, George Davey; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B.; Ferrieres, Jean; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Franks, Paul W.; Franks, Stephen; Frossard, Philippe; Gambaro, Giovanni; Gaunt, Tom R.; Groop, Leif; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayward, Caroline; Hennig, Branwen J.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Ingelsson, Erik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Kee, Frank; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Launer, Lenore J.; Lind, Lars; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Majumder, Abdulla Al Shafi; Laakso, Markku; McCarthy, Mark; Melander, Olle; Mohlke, Karen L.; Murray, Alison D.; Nordestgaard, Borge Gronne; Orho-Melander, Marju; Packard, Chris J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmas, Walter; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David J.; Prentice, Andrew M.; Province, Michael A.; Relton, Caroline L.; Rice, Kenneth; Ridker, Paul M.; Rolandsson, Olov; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Rotter, Jerome; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sattar, Naveed; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Smith, Blair H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Starr, John M.; Sebert, Sylvain; Taylor, Kent D.; Lakka, Timo A.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tobin, Martin D.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Meer, Peter; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Verweij, Niek; Virtamo, Jarmo; Volker, Uwe; Weir, David R.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Charchar, Fadi J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Butterworth, Adam S.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Danesh, John; Edwards, Todd L.; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Adriana M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Liu, Chunyu; Manning, Alisa K.; Morris, Andrew P.; Morrison, Alanna C.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Saleheen, Danish; Stefansson, Kari; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chasman, Daniel; Levy, Daniel; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Munroe, Patricia B.; Howson, Joanna M. M. (2020)
    Genetic studies of blood pressure (BP) to date have mainly analyzed common variants (minor allele frequency > 0.05). In a meta-analysis of up to similar to 1.3 million participants, we discovered 106 new BP-associated genomic regions and 87 rare (minor allele frequency